Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
Twelve-year-old Sumiko feels her life has been made up of two parts: before Pearl Harbor and after it. The good part and the bad part. Raised on a flower farm in California, Sumiko is used to being the only Japanese girl in her class. Even when the other kids tease her, she always has had her flowers and family to go home to.

That all changes after the horrific events of Pearl Harbor. Other Americans start to suspect that all Japanese people are spies for the emperor, even if, like Sumiko, they were born in the United States! As suspicions grow, Sumiko and her family find themselves being shipped to an internment camp in one of the hottest deserts in the United States. The vivid color of her previous life is gone forever, and now dust storms regularly choke the sky and seep into every crack of the military barrack that is her new "home."

Sumiko soon discovers that the camp is on an Indian reservation and that the Japanese are as unwanted there as they'd been at home. But then she meets a young Mohave boy who might just become her first real friend...if he can ever stop being angry about the fact that the internment camp is on his tribe's land.

With searing insight and clarity, Newbery Medal-winning author Cynthia Kadohata explores an important and painful topic through the eyes of a young girl who yearns to belong. Weedflower is the story of the rewards and challenges of a friendship across the racial divide, as well as the based-on-real-life story of how the meeting of Japanese Americans and Native Americans changed the future of both.
Published: Atheneum Books for Young Readers on Jun 30, 2008
ISBN: 9781439132104
List price: $7.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Weedflower
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

Not compelling. Easy to put down. Interesting to young adults with an interest in Japanese internment - maybe.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Twelve year old Sumiko and her Japanese-American family are relocated to an internment camp. This forces them to give up the flower growing business that is an integral part of who they are. Prior to Pearl Harbor and war breaking out, the section where Sumiko is uninvited to the birthday party by the mother (pg. 34 - 37) is heart breaking and would be a great hook for many readers. It feels incredibly real in its cruelty.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Plot: 12-year-old Sumiko lives with her uncle’s family on his flower farm in California. Life isn’t easy. Her parents died in a car crash and as the only Japanese girl at school, she has no friends. But she’s happy and takes pride in her work with the flowers. Everything changes after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Her uncle and grandfather are taken away and the rest of the family is sent to a relocation center on a Mohave reservation. Conditions are hard and tensions are high between the “Nikkei” and the Indians on the reserve. But in the midst of it all, Sumiko befriends a Mohave boy whose life is perhaps even worse than hers.This is a very quick read; I read it in less than a day. And enjoyed it. I shed a tear a couple of times towards the end. Kadohata knows her subject well and it shows in her writing. Though this is fiction, Sumiko’s experiences are realistic and true to the experiences of Japanese-Americans if not in detail, then in feeling. If the writing is simple, it is good and clearly expresses Sumiko’s feelings: the hurt, the anger, the shame and the boredom. I felt as though her friendship with Frank, and the relationship with the Mohave, could have been explored more however. The way the novel ends and where Kadohata chooses to end it suggests that this friendship was the main element of the story but in truth they only meet briefly about 6 times. But that’s a little enough complaint I suppose.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

Not compelling. Easy to put down. Interesting to young adults with an interest in Japanese internment - maybe.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Twelve year old Sumiko and her Japanese-American family are relocated to an internment camp. This forces them to give up the flower growing business that is an integral part of who they are. Prior to Pearl Harbor and war breaking out, the section where Sumiko is uninvited to the birthday party by the mother (pg. 34 - 37) is heart breaking and would be a great hook for many readers. It feels incredibly real in its cruelty.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Plot: 12-year-old Sumiko lives with her uncle’s family on his flower farm in California. Life isn’t easy. Her parents died in a car crash and as the only Japanese girl at school, she has no friends. But she’s happy and takes pride in her work with the flowers. Everything changes after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Her uncle and grandfather are taken away and the rest of the family is sent to a relocation center on a Mohave reservation. Conditions are hard and tensions are high between the “Nikkei” and the Indians on the reserve. But in the midst of it all, Sumiko befriends a Mohave boy whose life is perhaps even worse than hers.This is a very quick read; I read it in less than a day. And enjoyed it. I shed a tear a couple of times towards the end. Kadohata knows her subject well and it shows in her writing. Though this is fiction, Sumiko’s experiences are realistic and true to the experiences of Japanese-Americans if not in detail, then in feeling. If the writing is simple, it is good and clearly expresses Sumiko’s feelings: the hurt, the anger, the shame and the boredom. I felt as though her friendship with Frank, and the relationship with the Mohave, could have been explored more however. The way the novel ends and where Kadohata chooses to end it suggests that this friendship was the main element of the story but in truth they only meet briefly about 6 times. But that’s a little enough complaint I suppose.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I liked this book okay. It was a good story, but I felt it was a little too tame. The main character did not really have to go through as many hardships as I would imagine. However, it is for youth.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Before Pearl Harbor Sumiko works with her uncle's family on a flower farm in southern California and dreams of owning her own flower shop. When the war starts Sumiko's family is split apart and she is moved to a internment camp in Arizona located on a Mojave reservation.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Boring and really young-sounding. Like, somehow sounds almost condescending.

Still searching for a decent book for 8th grade summer reading that's something 8th graders will want to read. (teachers currently want the adult book Hotel on the Corner of Bitter & Sweet, which at a glance looks like it'll bore 8th graders to tears.)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Load more
scribd