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We are the first generation raised without God. We are creatures with strong religious impulses, yet they have nowhere to flow in this world of malls and TV, Kraft dinners and jets. How do we cope with loneliness? Anxiety? The collapse of relationships?
How do we reach the quiet, safe layer of our lives? In this compellingly innovative collection of stories, bestselling author Douglas Coupland responds to these themes. Cutting through the hype of modern living to find a rare grace amid our lives, he uncovers a new kind of truth for a culture stuck on fast-forward. A culture seemingly beyond God.
Published: Washington Square Press on May 11, 2010
ISBN: 9781439121900
List price: $15.99
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This book meandered, and I think Coupland was attempting to tackle some big issues here, but it just didn't work for me. The section describing the nuclear meltdown scenarios was overlong, and in the end the book just didn't gel. It also felt too much like a memoir to call it a novel, but I guess the names were changed to protect the innocent, or something like that.read more
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A little bit to get you going after "Microserfs" and "Generation X." Hardly the vintage stuff but there are some pearls of atomic-age wisdom buried in here, and some fine characters to get to know too.read more
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Unlike his longer fiction these short stories find Coupland at his best. The tales are succinct, full of heart (despite their usually downbeat tone) and a sort empathy gained from knowing you're not the only one to feel like this.read more
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Reviews

This book meandered, and I think Coupland was attempting to tackle some big issues here, but it just didn't work for me. The section describing the nuclear meltdown scenarios was overlong, and in the end the book just didn't gel. It also felt too much like a memoir to call it a novel, but I guess the names were changed to protect the innocent, or something like that.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A little bit to get you going after "Microserfs" and "Generation X." Hardly the vintage stuff but there are some pearls of atomic-age wisdom buried in here, and some fine characters to get to know too.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Unlike his longer fiction these short stories find Coupland at his best. The tales are succinct, full of heart (despite their usually downbeat tone) and a sort empathy gained from knowing you're not the only one to feel like this.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I really like Douglas Coupland. He is considered the writer of Generation X. This book was more a collection of semi-autobiographical intertwined essays (think David Sedaris set in Canada) than a true collection of fiction. While this was not my favorite thing that Coupland has written, it is well worth the read.
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A compilation of short stories reflecting on life's trials and regrets of one man and trying to understand what it all means. The title Life after God is specifically talking about being raised in a society where religion and thus God does not play a key role but after reminiscing on his life he realizes that there is a place for God and that he needs God whatever God may be.
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I was given this book as a gift during a rough period in my life having just finished high school. Im not sure exactly what this book is about other than it's main character often reflections on where he is now based on where he has been and the daily struggle to get by in life with those decisions are made already.The book isnt religious dispite the title..and the last chapter I thought was very good.Be warned though, if you were to pick up Less Than Zero by Bret Easton Ellis today, the way Douglas Coupland writes about pop culture makes the book feel very dated, but still a great book, and a easy read if your feeling like your life is in a rut. It wont give you answers, but misery loves company.
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