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Originally drawn to Yaqui Indian spiritual leader don Juan Matus for his knowledge of psychotropic plants, bestselling author Carlos Castaneda immersed himself in the sorcerer’s magical world. Ten years after his first encounter with the shaman, Castaneda examines his field notes and comes to understand what don Juan knew all along—psychotropic plants are merely a means to understanding alternative realities that one cannot fully embrace on one’s own. Journey to Ixtlan introduces these clear new ideas—omitted from Castaneda’s classic volumes The Teachings of Don Juan and A Separate Reality—to the reader for the first time. Castaneda explores, as he comes to experience it himself, his own final voyage into the teachings of don Juan, and shares with us what it is like to truly "stop the world" and perceive reality on his own terms.
Published: Washington Square Press on Apr 17, 2012
ISBN: 9781439121849
List price: $13.99
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I read the first half dozen of the Don juan novels and was mesmerised and transported. This is my favourite one. I reread it and confirmed my opinion. The story is haunting.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book moved me. Much rather, I should say, the very last chapter moved me and nearly had me expressing tears. This is my first book of the Don Juan series of philosophy and shaman ways, but I am told it is the most accessible, which I would agree with so far: the book was very engaging, and did not seem bogged down with philosophy. Although, I was, as I am sure many readers would be, torn as to how much of this story to believe actually happened. It is classified as a book of nonfiction, and it is written as a first person account as to what Carlos says he experienced. However…well, there's a lot of fantastic magic that takes place in front of this eye-witness.In spite of all of that, I feel as though I picked up a lot from reading it, and I felt as though much of what I go through in my own life has only been confirmed by Don Juan's teachings to Carlos. I liked that.But, the last chapter, the confession of knowing once you make this transformation, there's no turning back, and one is still human once conquering their "ally" and seeing the other worlds…and one cannot go back to the place they once called home in spite of taking the rest of their life to journey back. That was heartbreaking to me, and, it would seem, heartbreaking to Carlos as well.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I know I am a little late to the party, but when I spotted Castaneda's book in a used book store I decided it was an omen. It was about time I read one of these famous books. I'm not sure what to make of the author's journeys into the desert with the sorcerer Don Juan, but I did like Castaneda's straight-forward, nonjudgmental style. I'm not sure what is and is not believable in the story, as some of the more bizarre experiences are truly fantastic. I personally dealt with this by assuming that the human mind can take us many places and there is much we do not know about the spiritual and mystical world. The only distraction was Cataneda's occasional comment of self-deprecation, and these seemed well placed. Nearly 50 years after the initial encounters with Don Juan, it seems that many of the ideas introduced resonant with subsequent literature published in the intervening years. It's fascinating read and I'm glad I finally got to it.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

I read the first half dozen of the Don juan novels and was mesmerised and transported. This is my favourite one. I reread it and confirmed my opinion. The story is haunting.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book moved me. Much rather, I should say, the very last chapter moved me and nearly had me expressing tears. This is my first book of the Don Juan series of philosophy and shaman ways, but I am told it is the most accessible, which I would agree with so far: the book was very engaging, and did not seem bogged down with philosophy. Although, I was, as I am sure many readers would be, torn as to how much of this story to believe actually happened. It is classified as a book of nonfiction, and it is written as a first person account as to what Carlos says he experienced. However…well, there's a lot of fantastic magic that takes place in front of this eye-witness.In spite of all of that, I feel as though I picked up a lot from reading it, and I felt as though much of what I go through in my own life has only been confirmed by Don Juan's teachings to Carlos. I liked that.But, the last chapter, the confession of knowing once you make this transformation, there's no turning back, and one is still human once conquering their "ally" and seeing the other worlds…and one cannot go back to the place they once called home in spite of taking the rest of their life to journey back. That was heartbreaking to me, and, it would seem, heartbreaking to Carlos as well.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I know I am a little late to the party, but when I spotted Castaneda's book in a used book store I decided it was an omen. It was about time I read one of these famous books. I'm not sure what to make of the author's journeys into the desert with the sorcerer Don Juan, but I did like Castaneda's straight-forward, nonjudgmental style. I'm not sure what is and is not believable in the story, as some of the more bizarre experiences are truly fantastic. I personally dealt with this by assuming that the human mind can take us many places and there is much we do not know about the spiritual and mystical world. The only distraction was Cataneda's occasional comment of self-deprecation, and these seemed well placed. Nearly 50 years after the initial encounters with Don Juan, it seems that many of the ideas introduced resonant with subsequent literature published in the intervening years. It's fascinating read and I'm glad I finally got to it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Reading this after A Seperate Reality was what made this treatment the most satisfying. Further with Don Juan. The Yaqui Shaman is very much a character, introducing Castaneda to local workers, witches and totem spirits. The Native American spirit is superlatively revealed in this jovial search for a oneness with the surrounding universe, while at the same time, figuratively winking at the quest for the unity of mankind. Very Fun Read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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