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When Molly Wizenberg's father died of cancer, everyone told her to go easy on herself, to hold off on making any major decisions for a while. But when she tried going back to her apartment in Seattle and returning to graduate school, she knew it wasn't possible to resume life as though nothing had happened. So she went to Paris, a city that held vivid memories of a childhood trip with her father, of early morning walks on the cobbled streets of the Latin Quarter and the taste of her first pain au chocolat. She was supposed to be doing research for her dissertation, but more often, she found herself peering through the windows of chocolate shops, trekking across town to try a new pâtisserie, or tasting cheeses at outdoor markets, until one evening when she sat in the Luxembourg Gardens reading cookbooks until it was too dark to see, she realized that her heart was not in her studies but in the kitchen.

At first, it wasn't clear where this epiphany might lead. Like her long letters home describing the details of every meal and market, Molly's blog Orangette started out merely as a pleasant pastime. But it wasn't long before her writing and recipes developed an international following. Every week, devoted readers logged on to find out what Molly was cooking, eating, reading, and thinking, and it seemed she had finally found her passion. But the story wasn't over: one reader in particular, a curly-haired, food-loving composer from New York, found himself enchanted by the redhead in Seattle, and their email correspondence blossomed into a long-distance romance.

In A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes from My Kitchen Table, Molly Wizenberg recounts a life with the kitchen at its center. From her mother's pound cake, a staple of summer picnics during her childhood in Oklahoma, to the eggs she cooked for her father during the weeks before his death, food and memories are intimately entwined. You won't be able to decide whether to curl up and sink into the story or to head straight to the market to fill your basket with ingredients for Cider-Glazed Salmon and Pistachio Cake with Honeyed Apricots.

Topics: Family, Death, Fathers, Grief, Expat Life, Artisans, Contemplative, Paris, Seattle, Cookbooks, Creative Nonfiction, and Heartfelt

Published: Simon & Schuster on Mar 3, 2009
ISBN: 9781416594451
List price: $13.99
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Where are the illustrations, SCRIBD????? Arrrggghhhh! I'd LOVE to see what Camilla Engman does with the book. VERY DISAPPOINTED!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A delightful mix of memoir and recipe. Fans of Wizenberg's blog Orangette will surely enjoy.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Delicious read by a fun, funny, and forthright female. I adore Molly Wizenberg for her frank and non-judgmental approach to life. She writes about cooking, eating, and dining with such passion and relatability. I love that she claims no 'secret' recipes. They are meant to be shared, according to Molly, and she names many of her favorite dishes in the book after the person who introduced the dish to her. I admit, I even called my mom halfway through a chapter suggesting we book a trip to France, just she, my sister, and I. An author who inspires such a consideration deserves praise. Molly has also coaxed me gently into the kitchen, sorting through old family recipes, in search of way more than just food energy. I'm off to bake meringues and molasses crackle cookies with spiced orange!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A charming book with recipes!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Oh my! I loved this book. I probably drooled on it too. Stories and recipes describes it perfectly. I made it to page 33 before I had to stop and go make one of her recipes. I've made two now and they were both delectable. Buy it, read it, store it on the shelf with your cookbooks.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
As a longtime fan of Orangette, Molly Wizenberg's blog, I was one of a food-loving, dorksome crowd who raced to buy this book immediately. I savoured it for weeks — okay, A week —, allowing myself to read small bits at a time, hoping to eke out the snuggly feelings as long as possible. Wizenberg writes easily, sweetly, about food and family, wrapping flavors tightly together with memory. It's a soothing way to read about recipe development, one story at a time, meals building up like steps. Molly is relatable — writing about simple, comforting food without judgement or attitude. Readers will find her approach honest, honeyed and inspiring.Overall, the recipes here are cozy bits of Wizenberg history, splashed together sometimes haphazardly. Salad recipes abound, for which my vegetarian leanings are grateful, and desserts are hearty, flavorsome staples. Molly flipflops between clever tweaks on classic dishes and presenting the classic dish pared down to its basic essence. But either way, most are recipes you'll appreciate for their fuss-free directions and ingredient lists.Wizenberg's book is a charmer, stories and recipes alike.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I loved this book. Absolutely loved it. Part cookbook, part memoir, Molly Wizenberg is an amazing writer and cook. I really do wish I lived closer to her so I could meet her.I was first introduced to Molly through her blog, Orangette. I have no idea how I came across it in the first place, but I'm glad I did. Then I heard that she had a book out, which I thought would be interesting to read. Then I saw the book at Borders, and no amount of penny-pinching could keep me from buying it. I mean, just look at that cover! Gorgeous.Reading her book is really like reading her blog, but with more consistency. I feel like I got a better view of her life, but really, the whole reason I kept reading Orangette was for the commentary (the recipes, though, are interesting enough to keep you coming back just to see what she's come up with). I loved hearing how she equated her life with food. And I guess that's why I love her book, too. Food is an essential part of life. It's what families convene for, rain or shine. There should be stories to tell.There are three essential things you need when you pick up this book: wine, cheese, and a box of Kleenex. Now I'm not one for sob stories, and this isn't one of them. But an essential part of Molly's life, and a huge reason she loves food so much, is because of her father, who died of cancer. The book is not only dedicated to him, but many of the stories are reflections of her time spent with him, and some are tearjerkers because that's just the way life is.Her recipes, by the way, look extraordinary. I haven't tried one yet, but I fully intend to. They are not, however, for the faint of heart. Many call for whole milk or whole-fat cream; it's a wonder she's still skinny. There is a recipe for just about everything in this book: potato salad to chocolate cake, scones to soup. You could be in the mood for absolutely anything, and you would find it here.I have to say, I particularly enjoyed Molly's writing. It was as if she was writing a letter to a friend, and I loved her anecdotes stating that breakfast is the reason she gets out of bed in the morning (I can totally relate) and that "getting married is not for pansies" (amen). To write like this is to make the most ordinary of lives interesting. (Although I assure you, her life has been anything but ordinary. Just check out the section on her first love -- in Paris, no less.)Easily 5 out of 5 stars. I loved it, and if you like food and the tales that go with it, you'll love it, too.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A very enjoyable read, and fascinating recipes. At first I didn't think I was going to enjoy what I thought was going to be simply discussion of the food before the recipes, but as the author began to discuss her own life, and the way it was often wound around food, I began to thoroughly enjoy it. Special highlights are the discussion of her father's death, her romance with a blog-reader, and their friendships with other foodies.I don't believe I've ever torn up a book I could have kept, sold, traded, or given away, but I did with this. I was going to copy the recipes I wanted, but there were so many that it was easier to tear them out. As I tore, I realized that I will relive the joy of reading the book when I cook off of paperback pages, rather than xerox!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
So far, I've made the tomato & fennel soup, the scottish scones with ginger and lemon, and the bouchons au thon. All were great, especially the bouchons.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Quick and enjoyable read. Good writing & recipes too. My one editorial comment: Cut (way) down on the use of the term slurry.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I was put off by this book's earnest title, but the story itself won me over almost immediately. Told in Molly Wizenberg's engaging voice, this is a story of food and love, studded with wonderful recipes. I loved her quirky take on blogs, chocolate, meeting her husband, everything.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
i simply loved this book. Such an enjoyable read. I kept it at my bedside to read slowly. I would read again for fun.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Molly has an incredible voice, whose stories make me want to sit down at the table with her, preferably over a simple salad and a rustic cake, and hear more and more and more. This collection of stories, each paired with a recipe, offers vignettes of her life and a bare autobiography, and shows how integral food and the table is to a well-lived life. She describes a life of simple pleasures, and the way she cooks seems so effortless. Every chapter made me want to get into the kitchen and give the recipe a try, but more significantly, it made me want to think and move differently in the kitchen. This book is charming and fascinating, and made me feel like I was wrapped up in a cozy blanket. I will definitely read it again.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I adored this book. I read it in the summer and found myself contemplating making her fruit nut balls she makes each Christmas and even Ed Fretwell's Soup; a hearty soup with swiss chard, carrots and white beans, all in 95 degree weather! She really has a way of connecting the food to the events in her life in a poetic, lovely way. The love and respect she had for her Dad, is beautiful, as is her very own love story and how she met "the one". I'm considering putting this book next to my most used cookbooks because I know I will be reaching for it often enough, but it would be equally at home on the shelf with my most beloved fiction. It was delightful. I want more!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A combination of memoir and recipes. I liked the way Wizenberg was able to weave together different portions of her life in a way that didn’t feel sort of self-indulgent or self-congratulatory. And some of the recipes look really good. [Mar. 2011]read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I just loved reading this book. It inspired me to make pasta, and I'm still thinking about picking up one of the instruments she talks about! Such an inspiring book for sure. Someday, I'd love to have more of the experiences she did (life on a farm, having chickens, etc, etc). For now, I live vicariously through fabulous writings such as this one =)read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Molly Wizenberg has written a beautiful tribute to her family, her father in particular, and to the soothing, comforting, exciting power of food. She starts by introducing us to her family, and before long you feel like one of them, in the kitchen late at night stirring, tasting, and baking Fresh Ginger Cake with Caramelized Pears. She takes us to Paris and Seattle and we meet all her friends along the way. Molly gently leads us through Christmas with Espresso-Walnut Toffee, her father's battle with cancer with Italian Grotto Eggs, and to the French Style Yogurt Cake with Lemon that changed everything. Her stories are simple, like her food, but comforting and filling too. Molly Wizenberg is absolutely one of the best food writers I have read. She has a way of drawing you in, making you feel a part of the story, and she makes me itch to get in the kitchen and try her recipes! This is a book I will use often, mostly when I have the urge to cook, but can't decide what. I'll give this book to friends and family and hope they get the same feelings of contentment and joy from this book as I did.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I really enjoyed this book overall... I had to keep in mind that it is a memoir and therefore not the reality that most people have with regards to being able to jaunt down to the local market and pick up specialized ingredients. It has opened up my willingness to thinkout of the box in the kitchen!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I can't speak to the recipes in this book, as I've yet to try them, but the prose here is simply beautiful and heart-felt. Wizenberg is the author of the popular food blog, Orangette, and this book uses the same familiar, intelligent voice as do her entries there. Over the course of a series of essays, Wizenberg shares her memories of the various events of her life and how they were always linked to food, including growing up in Oklahoma with her parents, holidays with her much older half-siblings, her father's joyous approach to food and food preparation, travels, and hardship. We learn of her father's illness and death a few years ago, and of Wizenberg's own struggle to redefine her life in the wake of that loss. Each vignette includes a recipe or two that ties into the story. Such a joy to read.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A food memoir, in the tradition of M. F. K. Fisher, but homier. Delightful reading--part cookbook, part love story, part tribute to her late father (and watch out for the chapter where she shares her father's last hours; it knocked me cold). Wizenberg loves butter, and chocolate, and cheese, and unexpected combinations of tastes. Cholesterol and indigestion just don't exist in her universe. (She's only 30-something, bless 'er.) Nothing smacks of test kitchens, or, god forbid, Food Channel challenges. Many of the recipes were the result of raiding the fridge to come up with lunch or dessert without a lot of pre-planning. Some people can just DO that---my sister-in-law, for one. But those serendipitous combinations don't always work the second time, because some of the magic is in the surprise. So I suspect these recipes may have been subjected to tweaking and refining before they made it into the book. But it's very plain that there was a lot of fun in the creation, and I'd take pot luck with Molly Wizenberg any time.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the first cookbook that made me cry. My eyes filled up numerous times, as did my To Be Cooked pile. Nicely done cookbook-memoir from Wizenberg who has a lovely writing style and accessible recipes. I'd write a longer review, but I've got Banana Bread with Chocolate Chips and Crystallized Ginger ingredients strewn across my kitchen counter. Highly recommended, in other words.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It is both accurate & appropriate to say that I devoured this book.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The stories were fun. They were cute, related and likeable, but what I loved most about this book was something I discovered days, even weeks later. I couldn't tell you what any particular story was about, but I could tell you the recipe included chocolate and arugula. I could tell you there was lots of butter in a delicious-sounding pound cake and I could tell you I had bookmarked more than half the book to try the recipes. It was fun having stories to accompany the recipes rather than pictures and from the recipes I've tried I yet to be disappointed.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Wow! Such a great book. Full of great writing and great food. This autobiography is layed out chronologically with each beautiful story used as a vehicle for delivering a beautiful recipe. Ms. Wizenberg has the most delicious way of describing her food, it makes you want to get in your kitchen and get cooking this instant. I took my time reading this one. Just a story or two a day because from the very beginning of the book I didn't want it to end. Luckily, I can follow her on the blog that started it all- Orangette.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm not what you'd call a foodie, or much of a cook, and yet I loved this memoir/cook book. Wizenberg tells interesting stories about her life, usually centered around her love of food, and punctuates each chapter with a recipe. The stories are interesting, funny, sometimes sad, and she's so good at explaining why she loves the various dishes that by the time you get to the recipe you're dying to try it. So far I've made her delicious "Changing Hearts and Minds" chocolate cake a couple of times, and it's been very well received. (And, bonus for me, easy to make!) I will definitely be keeping an eye on her blogread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
so good. there is so much more to food than just eating - it is friends and family and memories and connecting. The author shares her recipes (can't wait to try some ... especially the baked goods) and the stories behind her recipes.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

Where are the illustrations, SCRIBD????? Arrrggghhhh! I'd LOVE to see what Camilla Engman does with the book. VERY DISAPPOINTED!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A delightful mix of memoir and recipe. Fans of Wizenberg's blog Orangette will surely enjoy.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Delicious read by a fun, funny, and forthright female. I adore Molly Wizenberg for her frank and non-judgmental approach to life. She writes about cooking, eating, and dining with such passion and relatability. I love that she claims no 'secret' recipes. They are meant to be shared, according to Molly, and she names many of her favorite dishes in the book after the person who introduced the dish to her. I admit, I even called my mom halfway through a chapter suggesting we book a trip to France, just she, my sister, and I. An author who inspires such a consideration deserves praise. Molly has also coaxed me gently into the kitchen, sorting through old family recipes, in search of way more than just food energy. I'm off to bake meringues and molasses crackle cookies with spiced orange!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A charming book with recipes!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Oh my! I loved this book. I probably drooled on it too. Stories and recipes describes it perfectly. I made it to page 33 before I had to stop and go make one of her recipes. I've made two now and they were both delectable. Buy it, read it, store it on the shelf with your cookbooks.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
As a longtime fan of Orangette, Molly Wizenberg's blog, I was one of a food-loving, dorksome crowd who raced to buy this book immediately. I savoured it for weeks — okay, A week —, allowing myself to read small bits at a time, hoping to eke out the snuggly feelings as long as possible. Wizenberg writes easily, sweetly, about food and family, wrapping flavors tightly together with memory. It's a soothing way to read about recipe development, one story at a time, meals building up like steps. Molly is relatable — writing about simple, comforting food without judgement or attitude. Readers will find her approach honest, honeyed and inspiring.Overall, the recipes here are cozy bits of Wizenberg history, splashed together sometimes haphazardly. Salad recipes abound, for which my vegetarian leanings are grateful, and desserts are hearty, flavorsome staples. Molly flipflops between clever tweaks on classic dishes and presenting the classic dish pared down to its basic essence. But either way, most are recipes you'll appreciate for their fuss-free directions and ingredient lists.Wizenberg's book is a charmer, stories and recipes alike.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I loved this book. Absolutely loved it. Part cookbook, part memoir, Molly Wizenberg is an amazing writer and cook. I really do wish I lived closer to her so I could meet her.I was first introduced to Molly through her blog, Orangette. I have no idea how I came across it in the first place, but I'm glad I did. Then I heard that she had a book out, which I thought would be interesting to read. Then I saw the book at Borders, and no amount of penny-pinching could keep me from buying it. I mean, just look at that cover! Gorgeous.Reading her book is really like reading her blog, but with more consistency. I feel like I got a better view of her life, but really, the whole reason I kept reading Orangette was for the commentary (the recipes, though, are interesting enough to keep you coming back just to see what she's come up with). I loved hearing how she equated her life with food. And I guess that's why I love her book, too. Food is an essential part of life. It's what families convene for, rain or shine. There should be stories to tell.There are three essential things you need when you pick up this book: wine, cheese, and a box of Kleenex. Now I'm not one for sob stories, and this isn't one of them. But an essential part of Molly's life, and a huge reason she loves food so much, is because of her father, who died of cancer. The book is not only dedicated to him, but many of the stories are reflections of her time spent with him, and some are tearjerkers because that's just the way life is.Her recipes, by the way, look extraordinary. I haven't tried one yet, but I fully intend to. They are not, however, for the faint of heart. Many call for whole milk or whole-fat cream; it's a wonder she's still skinny. There is a recipe for just about everything in this book: potato salad to chocolate cake, scones to soup. You could be in the mood for absolutely anything, and you would find it here.I have to say, I particularly enjoyed Molly's writing. It was as if she was writing a letter to a friend, and I loved her anecdotes stating that breakfast is the reason she gets out of bed in the morning (I can totally relate) and that "getting married is not for pansies" (amen). To write like this is to make the most ordinary of lives interesting. (Although I assure you, her life has been anything but ordinary. Just check out the section on her first love -- in Paris, no less.)Easily 5 out of 5 stars. I loved it, and if you like food and the tales that go with it, you'll love it, too.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A very enjoyable read, and fascinating recipes. At first I didn't think I was going to enjoy what I thought was going to be simply discussion of the food before the recipes, but as the author began to discuss her own life, and the way it was often wound around food, I began to thoroughly enjoy it. Special highlights are the discussion of her father's death, her romance with a blog-reader, and their friendships with other foodies.I don't believe I've ever torn up a book I could have kept, sold, traded, or given away, but I did with this. I was going to copy the recipes I wanted, but there were so many that it was easier to tear them out. As I tore, I realized that I will relive the joy of reading the book when I cook off of paperback pages, rather than xerox!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
So far, I've made the tomato & fennel soup, the scottish scones with ginger and lemon, and the bouchons au thon. All were great, especially the bouchons.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Quick and enjoyable read. Good writing & recipes too. My one editorial comment: Cut (way) down on the use of the term slurry.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I was put off by this book's earnest title, but the story itself won me over almost immediately. Told in Molly Wizenberg's engaging voice, this is a story of food and love, studded with wonderful recipes. I loved her quirky take on blogs, chocolate, meeting her husband, everything.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
i simply loved this book. Such an enjoyable read. I kept it at my bedside to read slowly. I would read again for fun.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Molly has an incredible voice, whose stories make me want to sit down at the table with her, preferably over a simple salad and a rustic cake, and hear more and more and more. This collection of stories, each paired with a recipe, offers vignettes of her life and a bare autobiography, and shows how integral food and the table is to a well-lived life. She describes a life of simple pleasures, and the way she cooks seems so effortless. Every chapter made me want to get into the kitchen and give the recipe a try, but more significantly, it made me want to think and move differently in the kitchen. This book is charming and fascinating, and made me feel like I was wrapped up in a cozy blanket. I will definitely read it again.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I adored this book. I read it in the summer and found myself contemplating making her fruit nut balls she makes each Christmas and even Ed Fretwell's Soup; a hearty soup with swiss chard, carrots and white beans, all in 95 degree weather! She really has a way of connecting the food to the events in her life in a poetic, lovely way. The love and respect she had for her Dad, is beautiful, as is her very own love story and how she met "the one". I'm considering putting this book next to my most used cookbooks because I know I will be reaching for it often enough, but it would be equally at home on the shelf with my most beloved fiction. It was delightful. I want more!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A combination of memoir and recipes. I liked the way Wizenberg was able to weave together different portions of her life in a way that didn’t feel sort of self-indulgent or self-congratulatory. And some of the recipes look really good. [Mar. 2011]
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I just loved reading this book. It inspired me to make pasta, and I'm still thinking about picking up one of the instruments she talks about! Such an inspiring book for sure. Someday, I'd love to have more of the experiences she did (life on a farm, having chickens, etc, etc). For now, I live vicariously through fabulous writings such as this one =)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Molly Wizenberg has written a beautiful tribute to her family, her father in particular, and to the soothing, comforting, exciting power of food. She starts by introducing us to her family, and before long you feel like one of them, in the kitchen late at night stirring, tasting, and baking Fresh Ginger Cake with Caramelized Pears. She takes us to Paris and Seattle and we meet all her friends along the way. Molly gently leads us through Christmas with Espresso-Walnut Toffee, her father's battle with cancer with Italian Grotto Eggs, and to the French Style Yogurt Cake with Lemon that changed everything. Her stories are simple, like her food, but comforting and filling too. Molly Wizenberg is absolutely one of the best food writers I have read. She has a way of drawing you in, making you feel a part of the story, and she makes me itch to get in the kitchen and try her recipes! This is a book I will use often, mostly when I have the urge to cook, but can't decide what. I'll give this book to friends and family and hope they get the same feelings of contentment and joy from this book as I did.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I really enjoyed this book overall... I had to keep in mind that it is a memoir and therefore not the reality that most people have with regards to being able to jaunt down to the local market and pick up specialized ingredients. It has opened up my willingness to thinkout of the box in the kitchen!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I can't speak to the recipes in this book, as I've yet to try them, but the prose here is simply beautiful and heart-felt. Wizenberg is the author of the popular food blog, Orangette, and this book uses the same familiar, intelligent voice as do her entries there. Over the course of a series of essays, Wizenberg shares her memories of the various events of her life and how they were always linked to food, including growing up in Oklahoma with her parents, holidays with her much older half-siblings, her father's joyous approach to food and food preparation, travels, and hardship. We learn of her father's illness and death a few years ago, and of Wizenberg's own struggle to redefine her life in the wake of that loss. Each vignette includes a recipe or two that ties into the story. Such a joy to read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A food memoir, in the tradition of M. F. K. Fisher, but homier. Delightful reading--part cookbook, part love story, part tribute to her late father (and watch out for the chapter where she shares her father's last hours; it knocked me cold). Wizenberg loves butter, and chocolate, and cheese, and unexpected combinations of tastes. Cholesterol and indigestion just don't exist in her universe. (She's only 30-something, bless 'er.) Nothing smacks of test kitchens, or, god forbid, Food Channel challenges. Many of the recipes were the result of raiding the fridge to come up with lunch or dessert without a lot of pre-planning. Some people can just DO that---my sister-in-law, for one. But those serendipitous combinations don't always work the second time, because some of the magic is in the surprise. So I suspect these recipes may have been subjected to tweaking and refining before they made it into the book. But it's very plain that there was a lot of fun in the creation, and I'd take pot luck with Molly Wizenberg any time.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the first cookbook that made me cry. My eyes filled up numerous times, as did my To Be Cooked pile. Nicely done cookbook-memoir from Wizenberg who has a lovely writing style and accessible recipes. I'd write a longer review, but I've got Banana Bread with Chocolate Chips and Crystallized Ginger ingredients strewn across my kitchen counter. Highly recommended, in other words.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It is both accurate & appropriate to say that I devoured this book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The stories were fun. They were cute, related and likeable, but what I loved most about this book was something I discovered days, even weeks later. I couldn't tell you what any particular story was about, but I could tell you the recipe included chocolate and arugula. I could tell you there was lots of butter in a delicious-sounding pound cake and I could tell you I had bookmarked more than half the book to try the recipes. It was fun having stories to accompany the recipes rather than pictures and from the recipes I've tried I yet to be disappointed.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Wow! Such a great book. Full of great writing and great food. This autobiography is layed out chronologically with each beautiful story used as a vehicle for delivering a beautiful recipe. Ms. Wizenberg has the most delicious way of describing her food, it makes you want to get in your kitchen and get cooking this instant. I took my time reading this one. Just a story or two a day because from the very beginning of the book I didn't want it to end. Luckily, I can follow her on the blog that started it all- Orangette.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm not what you'd call a foodie, or much of a cook, and yet I loved this memoir/cook book. Wizenberg tells interesting stories about her life, usually centered around her love of food, and punctuates each chapter with a recipe. The stories are interesting, funny, sometimes sad, and she's so good at explaining why she loves the various dishes that by the time you get to the recipe you're dying to try it. So far I've made her delicious "Changing Hearts and Minds" chocolate cake a couple of times, and it's been very well received. (And, bonus for me, easy to make!) I will definitely be keeping an eye on her blog
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
so good. there is so much more to food than just eating - it is friends and family and memories and connecting. The author shares her recipes (can't wait to try some ... especially the baked goods) and the stories behind her recipes.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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