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Beloved, bumbling Detective Dirk Gently returns in this standalone novel from Douglas Adams, the legendary author of one of the most beloved science fiction novels of all time, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

When a check-in desk at London’s Heathrow Airport disappears in a ball of orange flame, the event is said to be an act of God. But which god? wonders holistic detective Dirk Gently. And how is this connected to Dirk’s battle with his cleaning lady over his filthy refrigerator…or to the murder of his latest client? Or are these events just another stretch of coincidences in the life of the world’s most off-kilter private investigator?

Douglas Adams, “one of England’s top exporters of irreverence” (Chicago Tribune), continues the implausible adventures of supersleuth Dirk Gently in his quest to solve the mysteries of the universe.

Topics: Alternate Universe, London, Norway, Norse Mythology, Speculative Fiction, Funny, Witty, Adventurous, Satirical, Supernatural Powers, Private Investigators, Poverty, Murder, and British Author

Published: Pocket Books on Feb 26, 2013
ISBN: 9781476739656
List price: $7.99
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I'm not sure whether this is the effect of not being jammed into half a train seat by someone twice the size of me, but The Long Dark Tea-time of the Soul seemed less funny but more absorbing than the first book. It helped that it included Norse gods, I think. I had no idea that Douglas Adams had tangled with them.

On the other hand, I don't really think that as much seemed to happen, somehow. Less plates seemed to be spinning. I think that was a good thing for the narrative, but it seemed to make the second book different in tone from the first... (And then I wonder if that was just because at no point did I have to stuff my Kindle back into a bag and run to get off a train because I was about to miss getting off at the correct station. I suspect I'm more influenced by the circumstances in which I read books than I realise.)

So... on some levels, I enjoyed this more than the first book, and on some levels, less. Quite an odd feeling.

I do like the nine tenths of the subconscious being given over to penguins.read more
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Honestly, it irritates me when other people do not get the genius of the Dirk Gently books. I had some laughing fits with this one, and I will never look at Norse gods the same way again. I love you Douglas...wherever you are.read more
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i found this perfectly charmingread more
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Reviews

I'm not sure whether this is the effect of not being jammed into half a train seat by someone twice the size of me, but The Long Dark Tea-time of the Soul seemed less funny but more absorbing than the first book. It helped that it included Norse gods, I think. I had no idea that Douglas Adams had tangled with them.

On the other hand, I don't really think that as much seemed to happen, somehow. Less plates seemed to be spinning. I think that was a good thing for the narrative, but it seemed to make the second book different in tone from the first... (And then I wonder if that was just because at no point did I have to stuff my Kindle back into a bag and run to get off a train because I was about to miss getting off at the correct station. I suspect I'm more influenced by the circumstances in which I read books than I realise.)

So... on some levels, I enjoyed this more than the first book, and on some levels, less. Quite an odd feeling.

I do like the nine tenths of the subconscious being given over to penguins.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Honestly, it irritates me when other people do not get the genius of the Dirk Gently books. I had some laughing fits with this one, and I will never look at Norse gods the same way again. I love you Douglas...wherever you are.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
i found this perfectly charming
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
"What God would be hanging around Terminal Two of Heathrow Airport trying to catch the 15.37 to Oslo?"Very funny - this is a follow-up to Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.
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I love this story and it's great fun to read!

“What was the Sherlock Holmes principle? ‘Once you have discounted the impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.’ ”

“I reject that entirely,” said Dirk sharply. “The impossible often has a kind of integrity to it which the merely improbably lacks. How often have you been presented with an apparently rational explanation of something that works in all respects other than one, which is that it is hopelessly improbable?...The first idea merely supposes that there is something we don’t know about, and...there are enough of those. The second, however, runs contrary to something fundamental and human which we do know about. We should therefore be very suspicious of it and all its specious rationality.”
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An interesting blend of detective story and fantasy. I found the book quite entertaining but not nearly as brilliant as the Hitchhiker's Guide. I was left puzzling as to why that is. This is what I came up with: What I like about the book is Douglas Adams' extremely witty style of writing. What I don't like is the story. While the Hitchhiker's Guide is wholly escapist, almost entirely set off this planet so remarkably removed very early on, the Long Dark Tea Time of the Soul tries to blend magic and London. Just not my cup of tea. Maybe Harry Potter spoiled that combination for me.Still, Douglas Adams' writing shines and makes for some good entertainment. Three stars.
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