Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
From Stephen E. Ambrose, bestselling author of Band of Brothers and D-Day, the inspiring story of the ordinary men of the U.S. army in northwest Europe from the day after D-Day until the end of the bitterest days of World War II.

In this riveting account, historian Stephen E. Ambrose continues where he left off in his #1 bestseller D-Day. Citizen Soldiers opens at 0001 hours, June 7, 1944, on the Normandy beaches, and ends at 0245 hours, May 7, 1945, with the allied victory. It is biography of the US Army in the European Theater of Operations, and Ambrose again follows the individual characters of this noble, brutal, and tragic war. From the high command down to the ordinary soldier, Ambrose draws on hundreds of interviews to re-create the war experience with startling clarity and immediacy. From the hedgerows of Normandy to the overrunning of Germany, Ambrose tells the real story of World War II from the perspective of the men and women who fought it.

Topics: World War II, Military, Soldiers, Nazis, Courage, 1940s, France, Germany, Belgium, and Creative Nonfiction

Published: Simon & Schuster on
ISBN: 9781476740256
List price: $15.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Citizen Soldiers by Stephen E. Ambrose
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
A very interesting history of World War II in Europe as told through personal accounts of men who shared their recollections. Eye opening in some chapters and moving in others.more
Oral history of American soldiers from D-Day to the surrender of Germany. I enjoy Ambrose but I found this book should have gripped me more which was a disappointment. Overall an enjoyable read and as a historian Stephen Ambrose is not afraid to criticise Montgomery and Bradley while praising Eisenhower. A good testament to the bravery of the ordinary foot-soldier.more
I loved the book. I thought it was a good view of the common soldiers lot in WWII.more
An excellent account of the overall story of American, and some German soldiers, from Normandy to the Rhine. Ambrose outlines the large campaigns and tries to add personal detail by recounting how individual soldiers experienced the events. He demonstrates how the success of the war rested largely on the NCO's rather than the Pattons, Montogomerys, and Eisenhowers of the war. A great narrative that allows the reader to get a small feeling for what happened during the closing year of the war. Looking forward to reading Ambrose's other works.more
Stephen Ambrose has the uncanny ability to take you back in time. His words pick you up and carry you hook, line and sinker, back to June 7, 1944 and forward through the great and terrible World War II. However, Citizen Soldiers is not a dry account of strategic war manuevers. It is not a blah blah blah play by play of how Germany's armies moved along the western/eastern slope while the Allies pushed further north or south. Those things did happen but Citizen Solders is more than that. It's as if you have been dropped in the middle of hand to hand skirmishes or have the ability to eavesdrop on Hitler's frequent phone arguments with a subordinate. You get to know people, places and events as if you are talking to the soldiers themselves, dodging bullets in the snow-covered country side, and witnesses skirmishes first hand. For once, the photographs and maps included do not make the storytelling vivid, they only enhance the words.more
This was one of the best books I have read/heard in a long time. The narrator was excellent and the story was engaging. The entire story was told through anecdotes interlaced into the history of the war. There was interesting information about WWII generals including Eisenhour, Patton, Bradley, and Montgomery (UK) as well as the German generals and their interactions that made this book well worth reading.more
I have read a great many war narratives, old and new, long and short, and this one was possibly the best, most personal war book I've ever read. Better than Black Hawk Down. Better than Band of Brothers. Better than The Coldest Winter. . .I especially liked the way the book treated the approach to the borders of the Reich. The story of the stall of the advance, the long winter, the pointless, fruitless loss and death in the Hurtgen--the period between Normandy and the Bulge--didn't so much change the way I thought about the course of the war as it just expanded it in depth. Particularly, Citizen Soldiers was unmatched in presenting how this long autumn and winter 1944-1945 affected the individual soldiers not so much just then, but in the final push into Germany.This book was a fast read, and engaging, but really gave the reader the sense of the slowness of time in miserable conditions.I'll just stop, because I could continue for a while, but one final note. I've been in the airborne infantry, and I've been in the Army Reserve as a CS troop. As such, the term, "Citizen Soldier" has been tainted by my experience of the term used today to describe the reserve soldier. They are people to be admired, but cannot compare to the discipline and training of the professional soldiery. For this reason, I avoided this book for a long time because I let my prejudices of the term in the title influence my expectations. Make no mistake, it is aptly named, but its title is its title, not the borrowed phrase.The citizen soldiers of this title are not those of the modern army propaganda team, but rather those of whom Tyrtaeus spoke:"For no man ever proves himself a good man in war unless he can endure to face the blood and the slaughter, go close against the enemy and fight with his hands. Here is courage, mankind's finest possession, here is the noblest prize that a young man can endeavor to win, and it is a good thing his polis and all the people share with him when a man plants his feet and stands in the foremost spears relentlessly, all thought of foul flight completely forgotten, and has trained his heart to be steadfast and to endure, and with words encourages the man who is stationed beside him. Here is a man who proves himself to be valiant in war. With a sudden rush he turns to fight the rugged battalions of the enemy, and sustains the beating waves of assault. And he who so falls among the champions and loses his sweet life, so blessing with honor his polis, his father, and all his people, with wounds in his chest, where the spear that he was facing has transfixed that massive guard of his shield, and gone through his breastplate as well, why, such a man is lamented alike by the young and the elders, and all his polis goes into mourning and grieves for his loss. His tomb is pointed out with pride, and so are his children, and his children's children, and afterward all the race that is his. His shining glory is never forgotten, his name is remembered, and he bcomes an immortal, though he lies under the ground, when one who was a brave man has been killed by the furious War God standing his ground and fighting hard for his children and land."more
Citizen Soldiers is a wonderful book. Ambrose is a master of combining the epic with the minuscule, offering a broad description of the US march from Normandy to Germany as well as a multitude of personal stories of heroism throughout the battles. A gripping book that's tough to put down.more
Here is author, Stephen Ambrose, at his best, utilizing extensive interviews of the actual Allied combatants involved in the battles leading to the liberation of Continental Europe in WWII. This time (in contrast to his other major WWII history, D-Day) there is an added dimension with the inclusion of stories of German combatants taken from interviews by Ambrose's son and the son of the German Panzer commander, Hans von Luck. We follow the progress of the war through the eyes of these individuals on both sides. Ambrose brings to the book all the wealth of his historical research background in giving the needed context for the individual accounts. A highly readable history.more
Ambrose is the master of telling the story of the everyday soldier. I don't care even a little that he lifted a line here and there. The absolute master of bringing the microcasms of war to life.more
Highly entertaining and well written presentation of the experiences of individual US infantry in the ETO from D-day through VE day. I really enjoy these books that give personal accounts of soldiers that allows you to feel what it was like to be there, and this is one of the best written in this category that I have read.more
Like all of Ambrose's WWII history, it is magnificent. This book is not about battles in general, but about the men who fought the battles, the guys in the foxholes.Terrific, simply terrific.more
An account of individual efforts and personal stories of US infabtry during WWII in Europe.more
Oh how I love primary sources. This book certainly deserves reading by people interested in World War II, by people curious about their forebears' generation, and by people who love letters and interviews.While Ambrose was later attacked for sloppy scholarship, that shouldn't detract from the power of the first person narratives in this book. Ambrose spreads out context like a cloth and then lays out these brief jewels of real emotion and exprience. (Man, am I gushing: anyway, it's a good read.)Readers -- especially those just starting their study of WWII in Europe -- may benefit from having another book handy to explain the sequence of events of the war and to provide a good map.more
Great book. I had a lot of respect for the men who fought and died in that war before I read this book. It has only increased since reading more about what they went through. God Bless our veterns, one and all.more
Read all 17 reviews

Reviews

A very interesting history of World War II in Europe as told through personal accounts of men who shared their recollections. Eye opening in some chapters and moving in others.more
Oral history of American soldiers from D-Day to the surrender of Germany. I enjoy Ambrose but I found this book should have gripped me more which was a disappointment. Overall an enjoyable read and as a historian Stephen Ambrose is not afraid to criticise Montgomery and Bradley while praising Eisenhower. A good testament to the bravery of the ordinary foot-soldier.more
I loved the book. I thought it was a good view of the common soldiers lot in WWII.more
An excellent account of the overall story of American, and some German soldiers, from Normandy to the Rhine. Ambrose outlines the large campaigns and tries to add personal detail by recounting how individual soldiers experienced the events. He demonstrates how the success of the war rested largely on the NCO's rather than the Pattons, Montogomerys, and Eisenhowers of the war. A great narrative that allows the reader to get a small feeling for what happened during the closing year of the war. Looking forward to reading Ambrose's other works.more
Stephen Ambrose has the uncanny ability to take you back in time. His words pick you up and carry you hook, line and sinker, back to June 7, 1944 and forward through the great and terrible World War II. However, Citizen Soldiers is not a dry account of strategic war manuevers. It is not a blah blah blah play by play of how Germany's armies moved along the western/eastern slope while the Allies pushed further north or south. Those things did happen but Citizen Solders is more than that. It's as if you have been dropped in the middle of hand to hand skirmishes or have the ability to eavesdrop on Hitler's frequent phone arguments with a subordinate. You get to know people, places and events as if you are talking to the soldiers themselves, dodging bullets in the snow-covered country side, and witnesses skirmishes first hand. For once, the photographs and maps included do not make the storytelling vivid, they only enhance the words.more
This was one of the best books I have read/heard in a long time. The narrator was excellent and the story was engaging. The entire story was told through anecdotes interlaced into the history of the war. There was interesting information about WWII generals including Eisenhour, Patton, Bradley, and Montgomery (UK) as well as the German generals and their interactions that made this book well worth reading.more
I have read a great many war narratives, old and new, long and short, and this one was possibly the best, most personal war book I've ever read. Better than Black Hawk Down. Better than Band of Brothers. Better than The Coldest Winter. . .I especially liked the way the book treated the approach to the borders of the Reich. The story of the stall of the advance, the long winter, the pointless, fruitless loss and death in the Hurtgen--the period between Normandy and the Bulge--didn't so much change the way I thought about the course of the war as it just expanded it in depth. Particularly, Citizen Soldiers was unmatched in presenting how this long autumn and winter 1944-1945 affected the individual soldiers not so much just then, but in the final push into Germany.This book was a fast read, and engaging, but really gave the reader the sense of the slowness of time in miserable conditions.I'll just stop, because I could continue for a while, but one final note. I've been in the airborne infantry, and I've been in the Army Reserve as a CS troop. As such, the term, "Citizen Soldier" has been tainted by my experience of the term used today to describe the reserve soldier. They are people to be admired, but cannot compare to the discipline and training of the professional soldiery. For this reason, I avoided this book for a long time because I let my prejudices of the term in the title influence my expectations. Make no mistake, it is aptly named, but its title is its title, not the borrowed phrase.The citizen soldiers of this title are not those of the modern army propaganda team, but rather those of whom Tyrtaeus spoke:"For no man ever proves himself a good man in war unless he can endure to face the blood and the slaughter, go close against the enemy and fight with his hands. Here is courage, mankind's finest possession, here is the noblest prize that a young man can endeavor to win, and it is a good thing his polis and all the people share with him when a man plants his feet and stands in the foremost spears relentlessly, all thought of foul flight completely forgotten, and has trained his heart to be steadfast and to endure, and with words encourages the man who is stationed beside him. Here is a man who proves himself to be valiant in war. With a sudden rush he turns to fight the rugged battalions of the enemy, and sustains the beating waves of assault. And he who so falls among the champions and loses his sweet life, so blessing with honor his polis, his father, and all his people, with wounds in his chest, where the spear that he was facing has transfixed that massive guard of his shield, and gone through his breastplate as well, why, such a man is lamented alike by the young and the elders, and all his polis goes into mourning and grieves for his loss. His tomb is pointed out with pride, and so are his children, and his children's children, and afterward all the race that is his. His shining glory is never forgotten, his name is remembered, and he bcomes an immortal, though he lies under the ground, when one who was a brave man has been killed by the furious War God standing his ground and fighting hard for his children and land."more
Citizen Soldiers is a wonderful book. Ambrose is a master of combining the epic with the minuscule, offering a broad description of the US march from Normandy to Germany as well as a multitude of personal stories of heroism throughout the battles. A gripping book that's tough to put down.more
Here is author, Stephen Ambrose, at his best, utilizing extensive interviews of the actual Allied combatants involved in the battles leading to the liberation of Continental Europe in WWII. This time (in contrast to his other major WWII history, D-Day) there is an added dimension with the inclusion of stories of German combatants taken from interviews by Ambrose's son and the son of the German Panzer commander, Hans von Luck. We follow the progress of the war through the eyes of these individuals on both sides. Ambrose brings to the book all the wealth of his historical research background in giving the needed context for the individual accounts. A highly readable history.more
Ambrose is the master of telling the story of the everyday soldier. I don't care even a little that he lifted a line here and there. The absolute master of bringing the microcasms of war to life.more
Highly entertaining and well written presentation of the experiences of individual US infantry in the ETO from D-day through VE day. I really enjoy these books that give personal accounts of soldiers that allows you to feel what it was like to be there, and this is one of the best written in this category that I have read.more
Like all of Ambrose's WWII history, it is magnificent. This book is not about battles in general, but about the men who fought the battles, the guys in the foxholes.Terrific, simply terrific.more
An account of individual efforts and personal stories of US infabtry during WWII in Europe.more
Oh how I love primary sources. This book certainly deserves reading by people interested in World War II, by people curious about their forebears' generation, and by people who love letters and interviews.While Ambrose was later attacked for sloppy scholarship, that shouldn't detract from the power of the first person narratives in this book. Ambrose spreads out context like a cloth and then lays out these brief jewels of real emotion and exprience. (Man, am I gushing: anyway, it's a good read.)Readers -- especially those just starting their study of WWII in Europe -- may benefit from having another book handy to explain the sequence of events of the war and to provide a good map.more
Great book. I had a lot of respect for the men who fought and died in that war before I read this book. It has only increased since reading more about what they went through. God Bless our veterns, one and all.more
Load more
scribd