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Richard Dawkins, bestselling author and the world’s most celebrated evolutionary biologist, has spent his career elucidating the many wonders of science. Here, he takes a broader approach and uses his unrivaled explanatory powers to illuminate the ways in which the world really works. Filled with clever thought experiments and jaw-dropping facts, The Magic of Reality explains a stunningly wide range of natural phenomena: How old is the universe? Why do the continents look like disconnected pieces of a jigsaw puzzle? What causes tsunamis? Why are there so many kinds of plants and animals? Who was the first man, or woman? Starting with the magical, mythical explanations for the wonders of nature, Dawkins reveals the exhilarating scientific truths behind these occurrences. This is a page-turning detective story that not only mines all the sciences for its clues but primes the reader to think like a scientist as well.

Topics: Illustrated, Evolution, Popular Science, Mythology, Spirituality , Philosophical, Informative, Natural Disasters, First Person Narration, British Author, Male Author, and 21st Century

Published: Free Press on
ISBN: 9781451690132
List price: $13.99
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Una mirada a lo mágico de la realidad a través de la ciencia. Algunos de los conceptos son muy básicos, sin embargo están muy bien explicados de forma que no es difícil entender. more
Interesting and good descriptions of ideas. more
The paperback version of this book contains no pictures. This is a book of stories, some true, some fictional, told in a very friendly, rational, and accessible voice. By the end of this book I understood just how truly brilliant it is. Its audience? Anyone over 12 I'd say.more
This book had beautiful, absolutely amazing illustrations and good explanations for a variety of scientific and natural phenomena. I loved reading it.more
Read all 13 reviews

Reviews

Una mirada a lo mágico de la realidad a través de la ciencia. Algunos de los conceptos son muy básicos, sin embargo están muy bien explicados de forma que no es difícil entender. more
Interesting and good descriptions of ideas. more
The paperback version of this book contains no pictures. This is a book of stories, some true, some fictional, told in a very friendly, rational, and accessible voice. By the end of this book I understood just how truly brilliant it is. Its audience? Anyone over 12 I'd say.more
This book had beautiful, absolutely amazing illustrations and good explanations for a variety of scientific and natural phenomena. I loved reading it.more
I'm not entirely sure why I still read Dawkins' work. I think he's an extremely intelligent person, of course, and I've enjoyed reading books that focus on science by him -- I love The Ancestor's Tale, for example. But I hate the way that he cannot stop poking at religion, and I expected to hate it even more in a book called The Magic of Reality.

Actually, he's more respectful than usual. It all seems rather toned down, since it's aimed at a younger audience than his other books (which is somewhat insulting in itself; I read and understood The Ancestor's Tale perfectly at the age of thirteen, and this book is aimed at 'ages twelve and up', I'm told). It can come across as condescending, though I rather appreciated the parts where he admits he doesn't know everything. It is accessible, for people of any age and any level of knowledge about science, covering basic topics like why we have seasons and what earthquakes are. It's quite enjoyable to read even though I don't think I learnt anything new, because it clarified things and connected ideas.

He is, of course, scathing about religion and dismissive of any belief in the supernatural, but if you're planning to read Dawkins, you probably know that already.more
Richard Dawkins is a biologist, but he also loves writing books about evolution, science and atheism. In this case, he's writing in a lighter style, obviously targetted at a younger audience. He gives religion equal treatment to other myths and legends and, while this might be upsetting to some people, I think he does a good job at not being too pushy. He takes popular myths, gives a bit of background about them, especially rationalizing why people tended to believe in them and then explains the phenomena and why they are just myths and not reality. The science is good, although sometimes his explanations are a bit convoluted (especially because he's trying to keep it simple and not use too many complicated terms or notions) - which is ok for me as a grown-up. I have a feeling certain parts of the book would bore a young reader or confuse them, but this book is ideally read by a parent together with the kids so that things can be explained when they get too confusing.Overall a great read and highly recommended for those wanting a "lighter" Dawkins experience. (I'm still slowly working through his [The Selfish Gene] book on genetics).more
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