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When Gaby faked a pregnancy to challenge stereotypes, she also changed her life. A compelling memoir from an inspirational teenage activist.

Growing up, Gaby Rodriguez was often told she would end up a teen mom. After all, her mother and her older sisters had gotten pregnant as teenagers; from an outsider’s perspective, it was practically a family tradition. Gaby had ambitions that didn’t include teen motherhood. But she wondered: how would she be treated if she “lived down” to others’ expectations? Would everyone ignore the years she put into being a good student and see her as just another pregnant teen statistic with no future? These questions sparked Gaby’s high school senior project: faking her own pregnancy to see how her family, friends, and community would react. What she learned changed her life forever—and made international headlines in the process.

In The Pregnancy Project, Gaby details how she was able to fake her own pregnancy—hiding the truth from even her siblings and boyfriend’s parents—and reveals all that she learned from the experience. But more than that, Gaby’s story is about fighting stereotypes, and how one girl found the strength to come out from the shadow of low expectations to forge a bright future for herself.
Published: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers on Jan 17, 2012
ISBN: 9781442446243
List price: $9.99
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the author is a young woman. I try to keep that in mind and not be furious at some of the views she expresses within. hopefully college will give her greater insight.

the book itself is standard, ghost written fair. it's readable but, that's all.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Congratulations for being the first non-fiction book reviewed with yattitude! As a teen non-fiction title, it's certainly a doozy. No one can tell Gaby that she doesn't have guts! She's a smart girl for realizing how her family's decisions have affected all of them, and she knew from a young age that she didn't want to repeat those mistakes. Her project showed an incredible amount of foresight, complete with fake baby bump and borrowed sonograms.While the story is compelling, Gaby's writing is what you would imagine for a teenager, though she certainly has potential to become a great writer. The writing is halting yet heartfelt, and very factual. This girl has done her research and drawn conclusions that the rest of us should have. She reminds us that every teen mom needs love and support, no matter what, because her health and the baby's are at stake if they're not taken care of. As a society, we can not continue to look down our noses at these girls.She's not suggesting we glorify them, either. Somewhere along the way there has to be a happy medium between shunning and making celebrities out of teen moms.Recommendation: This is the type of book you read because your sex ed teacher has thrust it in your hands. Short and to the point, it's great for any high-schooler or anyone who wants to defy the stereotypes and live their own life.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The writing isn't the best I've ever read but the story really takes off. Gaby Rodriguez has given us the story of her extraordinary school project. Her family is full of examples of girls who became pregnant while a teenager but she had plenty of role models to know this was not the life for her. One of the most important was her mother who started having children at a very young age and managed to love and support everyone without the help of a partner. Gaby ended up babysitting many of her nieces and nephews to give their young mothers a break. She saw first hand how life changed for a young mother and it was not all fun and fantasy!All her life she had seen how a diagnosis of pregnancy instantly changes how family, friends, and society view not only the mother-to-be but the father as well. Her idea was to record this shift and reveal to the world how harmful this is to the new family unit. In on her plans was her boyfriend, her mother, one sister, her best friend, the principal, and the assistant superintendent. She tried to show everyone how an honors student can continue to stay in school, get good grades, and continue to college if only she can get the support from teachers, family, and friends. The results of her project were very telling. I can't wait to share this book with students.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

the author is a young woman. I try to keep that in mind and not be furious at some of the views she expresses within. hopefully college will give her greater insight.

the book itself is standard, ghost written fair. it's readable but, that's all.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Congratulations for being the first non-fiction book reviewed with yattitude! As a teen non-fiction title, it's certainly a doozy. No one can tell Gaby that she doesn't have guts! She's a smart girl for realizing how her family's decisions have affected all of them, and she knew from a young age that she didn't want to repeat those mistakes. Her project showed an incredible amount of foresight, complete with fake baby bump and borrowed sonograms.While the story is compelling, Gaby's writing is what you would imagine for a teenager, though she certainly has potential to become a great writer. The writing is halting yet heartfelt, and very factual. This girl has done her research and drawn conclusions that the rest of us should have. She reminds us that every teen mom needs love and support, no matter what, because her health and the baby's are at stake if they're not taken care of. As a society, we can not continue to look down our noses at these girls.She's not suggesting we glorify them, either. Somewhere along the way there has to be a happy medium between shunning and making celebrities out of teen moms.Recommendation: This is the type of book you read because your sex ed teacher has thrust it in your hands. Short and to the point, it's great for any high-schooler or anyone who wants to defy the stereotypes and live their own life.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The writing isn't the best I've ever read but the story really takes off. Gaby Rodriguez has given us the story of her extraordinary school project. Her family is full of examples of girls who became pregnant while a teenager but she had plenty of role models to know this was not the life for her. One of the most important was her mother who started having children at a very young age and managed to love and support everyone without the help of a partner. Gaby ended up babysitting many of her nieces and nephews to give their young mothers a break. She saw first hand how life changed for a young mother and it was not all fun and fantasy!All her life she had seen how a diagnosis of pregnancy instantly changes how family, friends, and society view not only the mother-to-be but the father as well. Her idea was to record this shift and reveal to the world how harmful this is to the new family unit. In on her plans was her boyfriend, her mother, one sister, her best friend, the principal, and the assistant superintendent. She tried to show everyone how an honors student can continue to stay in school, get good grades, and continue to college if only she can get the support from teachers, family, and friends. The results of her project were very telling. I can't wait to share this book with students.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Gaby's mom first got pregnant at 14, and Gaby's seven older siblings all had children before they could legally drink. So nobody is terribly surprised when Gaby announces that she's pregnant. Disappointed, sure--she was supposed to have learned from all their mistakes--but not surprised. But what Gaby hasn't told them is that she's not really pregnant: it's all part of a social experiment for her senior project, viewing the effects of stereotypes and how people react to an unplanned pregnancy--and how they treat a teen mother.

The writing is kind of blah, but the story is interesting enough that I think it could easily be used on the summer list, particularly with the Common Core requirements of more non-fiction. Makes good points about what it means to live down to other people's expectations, and might make students a little more aware of what happens when they gossip about classmates (or others).
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When I first heard about “The Pregnancy Project,” I thought it was a horrible idea: to fake a pregnancy for a school project. I was certain the project would end up insulting teachers and students when they discovered the pregnancy was fake.  To my surprise, the project was well executed. The author did a good job of documenting not only her experiences, but also that of her classmates and family. While I assumed her classmates’ gossiping about her would be harsh, what really surprised me was the families.  I assumed that families of a pregnant teen would be supportive and helpful—for Rodriguez, her family pressure was worse than her classmate’s gossip.  This is an eye-opening book that I would recommend to anyone, not just teenagers.  While it really goes to the heart of what it's like to be pregnant in high school, it also illustrates how hurtful stereotypes can be.
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Definitely an interesting book about a teen's dramatic school project designed to showcase how stereotypes and prejudice can affect teens. The first half is all about Gaby's family history of teen pregnancy (her mother started having babies at 15 and most of her older siblings also had teen pregnancies). I skimmed the first half because what I was really interested in was her project. Gaby's an inspiration for teens facing stereotypes, bullying, and the mixed messages about teen pregnancy that flood the media.
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