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Editor’s Note

“Imaginative & Impactful...”

Isaacson’s exclusive biography brings this generation’s leading innovator to life again, illustrating the impact of imagination through interviews & anecdotes.
Niree N.
Scribd Editor
FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE BESTSELLING BIOGRAPHIES OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN AND ALBERT EINSTEIN, THIS IS THE EXCLUSIVE BIOGRAPHY OF STEVE JOBS.

Based on more than forty interviews with Jobs conducted over two years—as well as interviews with more than a hundred family members, friends, adversaries, competitors, and colleagues—Walter Isaacson has written a riveting story of the roller-coaster life and searingly intense personality of a creative entrepreneur whose passion for perfection and ferocious drive revolutionized six industries: personal computers, animated movies, music, phones, tablet computing, and digital publishing.

At a time when America is seeking ways to sustain its innovative edge, and when societies around the world are trying to build digital-age economies, Jobs stands as the ultimate icon of inventiveness and applied imagination. He knew that the best way to create value in the twenty-first century was to connect creativity with technology. He built a company where leaps of the imagination were combined with remarkable feats of engineering.  

Although Jobs cooperated with this book, he asked for no control over what was written nor even the right to read it before it was published. He put nothing off-limits. He encouraged the people he knew to speak honestly. And Jobs speaks candidly, sometimes brutally so, about the people he worked with and competed against. His friends, foes, and colleagues provide an unvarnished view of the passions, perfectionism, obsessions, artistry, devilry, and compulsion for control that shaped his approach to business and the innovative products that resulted.

Driven by demons, Jobs could drive those around him to fury and despair. But his personality and products were interrelated, just as Apple’s hardware and software tended to be, as if part of an integrated system. His tale is instructive and cautionary, filled with lessons about innovation, character, leadership, and values.

Topics: Computer Programming, Innovation, Silicon Valley, Creativity, Leadership, and Tech Industry

Published: Simon & Schuster on Oct 24, 2011
ISBN: 9781451648553
List price: $12.99
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Well written and engaging insight into one of the most iconic personalities in recent times. Quite well researched, the author strives clear of hero worship and shows Jobs as he was - vicious, persuasive and ultimately a world class visionary with a flawed human side. A must read for entrepreneurs, Apple fans and people just looking for a good, inspiring story.read more
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Excellent read. read more
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An interesting account of an interesting manread more
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this was a really great book.read more
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Steve Jobs was a genius, yes but not a well-rounded; kind and humble role model. He brought out the best in some people and perhaps the worst in others...Issacson's biography takes us from "one reality distortion field" to another; from the different shades of a tantrum-throwing, childish revolutionary obsessed with the purity of design and the integrity of engineering to the vulnerable technocrat battling cancer. The book does justice to the life and times of Steve Jobs. The book's recurrent theme of Steve Jobs' erratic managerial style and ability to piss people off does not make him an endearing leader but what makes him incredible are the stories and recollections of his vision and his firm belief in providing consumers with new needs and wants they didn't know existed... repeatedly and successfully!read more
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A great book for a great man. read more
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Love this bookread more
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It is a must read book.read more
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AMAZING!!!read more
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Great book!read more
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excelenteread more
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The book follow's Steve Job's personal life, which is to say it talks about his beloved company, Apple throughout, since Jobs' modus operandi at Apple has been part of Steve's DNA from the moment his adoptive father showed him that design excellence means getting even the details that nobody sees well crafted. The first half of the book talks about his biological parents and how he came to be adopted. Then about his adoptive parents and his early childhood and propensity for getting into trouble at school, mostly because he was so clever that he was easily bored. Then comes the friendship with Steve Wozniak with who Jobs created the first Apple computer. Wozniak was another genius, and passionate about engineering. Things get very technical to explain their early experimentation with electronics, as we're taken through the process of how the first Apple computer came to be, then the Apple II, then the Lisa, and finally the Macintosh, all created when Jobs was still in his early 20s. To show just how integral Apple was to his life and what a complex personality Jobs was, he named the Lisa after a daughter he had more or less abandoned in his early 20s. His personal life was messy. He studied Zen Buddhism from his late teens, adopted all kinds of extreme vegan diets, experimented a lot with LSD, did the whole India thing, and all these experiences somehow became connected to the products he created. How and why he was ousted from Apple in the 80s is discussed at length and in great detail, with countless quotes and bits of dialogue from many of the players involved, which to me ended up sounding more than anything like office politics being discussed around the water cooler. I've never been a water cooler kind of person, so found that part very irritating. Eventually in the second half, we get to Steve returning to Apple after several failures and the timeline continues to cover both his personal life and the inventions and products he created with the iPod, iTunes, the iTunes store, the Apple stores (which were thought by some analysts to fail miserably after one year), then the creation of the iPhone and finally, the iPad and the iCloud. Of course the last chapters examine his cancer and treatments, and how he eventually came to succumb to the illness. If you, like me, are interested to learn about the thinking behind these revolutionary products, this book is just the ticket for you. If you want a book with plenty of quotes and comments from people who knew and worked with Steve Jobs, along with plenty of comments from the horse's mouth, again, this is the book to go to. I found the evolution of the thinking behind each product and how it came to be designed and produced to be fascinating. But. For the first half of the book, I kept wondering why I was even bothering with it. Jobs comes off as one of the most unlikeable people imaginable. It may be that he was as unpleasant as portrayed, but I found it strange that he didn't seem to have a single redeeming quality, save for his focus on perfection. His personal charm was mentioned casually as just another tool in his arsenal, another means to an end, when the bullying had run it's course. I wish I'd kept track of amount of times the term Reality Distortion Field was mentioned. As says on wikipedia: "RDF was said to distort an audience's sense of proportion and scales of difficulties and made them believe that the task at hand was possible. While RDF has been criticized as anti-reality, those close to Jobs have also illustrated numerous instances in which creating the sense that the seemingly impossible was possible led to the impossible being accomplished." I got the point the first and tenth and fiftieth time.I suppose that Isaacson wanted to be true to Steve Jobs' manner of expression, so the entire book was filled wall to wall with expletives. Although I'm a big fan of Apple products, I don't have a particular bias towards Job; but what grated on me was that his brand of genius as a visionary with faultless design sense and a brilliant marketer didn't seem to carry much weight. Imagine someone writing about Picasso and focusing most of all on what a horrid man he was to others with offhanded mentions of what a brilliant artist he was. Comparing Jobs to Picasso might not be entirely appropriate, but it's undeniable that both men left a legacy that did, and will outlive them both. Yet, Jobs, ever the control freak, repeatedly told Isaacson he would not ask to see the manuscript and would not read the book when it was published, saying he knew there was a lot of it he wouldn't like, but trusting the author would write an accurate portrayal of him. To me, that speaks of a man who accepts himself with all his foibles, and that alone is a quality worthy of admiration.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Not the best written book - could have cut down on some of the stuff. The same point was made over and over again. However, Steve Jobs was an amazing man and his death is an incredible loss. I have never owned an Apple product but now I will!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is positioned at the rare nexus of a brilliant biographer and an amazing subject. I've read several of Isaacson's biographies (Ben Franklin, Albert Einstein), and they never disappoint. He has that rare gift that I have always appreciated in a history teacher of being able to recount the past as an enthralling, engaging story. But with Steve Jobs he completely outdoes himself. The book moves along at a torrid pace. It is not told completely chronologically; but rather as a series of stories about different events. He tells the story of the iPod, then he tells the story of Pixar being sold to Disney, then he tells the story of the early failures of Jobs' health. All three stories overlap in time, but are incredible narratives in their own right.I loved reading about why the Beatles did not permit the sale of their music on iTunes, how Jobs' took the idea of a GUI from Xerox (and Xerox management didn't even mind), the ideological battle over an integrated but closed architecture versus an open but inelegant design, how Job's set aside the creation of the iPad in order to focus on the iPhone.I also enjoyed getting to know what made Jobs tick. He is portrayed with all his flaws; and they are many. This man who changed so much about our world was neither a good boss nor a good husband/father. And yet his employees and his family loved him.I heartily recommend this book.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the first biography I have ever read so I do not know how it compares against other biographies, but I am absolutely impressed by the way this book is written. I am neither a Mac nor windows user and I wanted to read this biography to understand why Steven Jobs seemed to be a God. This book portrays Steven Jobs the way people perceived him, no holds barred, no diplomatic language, just raw Jobsian. The highest praise I can give for this book is this: If I ever get a biography done, I want Walter Isaacson to do itread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
There is no doubt Steve Jobs was phenomenal when it came to the products he helped develop at Apple. After being fired from the company he gave birth to he brought Apple back from the brink of bankruptcy in the late 1990's. Thanks to his innovations Apple is now the most valuable company on the face of the Earth. On the other hand, Steve had some troubling character flaws. He had a mercurial personality that rubbed many people the wrong way. He could be brutally honest. There was no middle ground in his world. Your ideas were either brilliant or they sucked. You were a genius or a piece of sh*t. Some would say this helped drive the creative process at Apple. Some of Apple's engineers said this helped push them accomplish things they never dreamed. On the flip side Steve's management style caused many to leave the company. One can only wonder what other things Apple could have accomplished had Steve practiced a more even tempered business approach. Still, he was a brilliant innovator who's leadership left an indelible mark in our world.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Terrific book that will make you miss him even more.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I have been a huge fan of Apple and their products for many years so this book was something I was looking forward to reading.It was very surprising to me to become aware of the type of person Steve Jobs was. The book portrayed a genius with few people skills. It is a compelling look into the life of someone who had such amazing vision and the brilliance with which to pull it off. Unbelievable how he treated those around him in order to achieve the perfection he envisioned.Great read and loved the way it was told with little stories of his dreams and accomplishments over the years.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Knowing very little about Jobs before starting this biography I found the book to be really informative and a nice page-turner. Not only is the Jobs aspect of the book good but I also found it a good broad overview of how the personal computer market became what it is. I would definitely be interested in trying another biography by Isaacson.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The book was well-written and well-sourced. But I wound up really disliking Steve Jobs.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is long, but I really liked it. While I remember most of the ads and changes discussed in this book, learning about it from the Steve Jobs perspective was an interesting chance to reflect on history.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Could not put this book down. As an Apple fan since 1978, the biography made me fell like part of the Apple family . . . like a very poor cousin.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An excellent biography. I have actually developed a deeper appreciation for Jobs and his vision, not to mention his products.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I recently attended a lecture by Walter Isaacson and I found him to be a fascinating speaker and so well informed. He spoke often of Jobs and you could tell the tremndous impact Jobs had on Isaacson. I found the book to be so fasinating with Jobs being a creative genius and a quirky individual who in his own words could be an asshole. The book is very long but well worth the read as it covers Jobs entire life and the history of Apple. Jobs really was behind creating things that changed the world we live in. He was so complex and had such drive and ambition but yet like most creative people he could be completely lost on the simpliest things. There are so many other reviews with more details but if you want a great biography this is it.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
To those in the middle of this book, accept my words of encouragement: You may want to bail, but hold your nose and keep going. I read the last sentence myself. I can testify that this book really does eventually end. Keep heart. It's all worth it. You'll be disillusioned with Jobs and liberated from Apple fan-boydom.

This is required reading for anyone attempting to work reflectively in a business context. Like with Gladwell's trilogy, it's full of landmarks useful for thinking with reflective business people. Like Gladwell, you may come close to clawing your face off with the slow pace, the repetition, and excessive gratuitous and compulsive story-winding. But like with Gladwell it actually can be tolerated if you work hard at it, which is more than can be said for most pop business books.

It's best to endure it on audiobook, and let the reader keep the momentum for you.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Isaacson doesn't just tell you who Jobs was and what he did, he explains why he was who was and why he did what he did. Great book, great character study.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

Well written and engaging insight into one of the most iconic personalities in recent times. Quite well researched, the author strives clear of hero worship and shows Jobs as he was - vicious, persuasive and ultimately a world class visionary with a flawed human side. A must read for entrepreneurs, Apple fans and people just looking for a good, inspiring story.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Great
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Great
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;-;
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fair
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Excellent read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An interesting account of an interesting man
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
this was a really great book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Steve Jobs was a genius, yes but not a well-rounded; kind and humble role model. He brought out the best in some people and perhaps the worst in others...Issacson's biography takes us from "one reality distortion field" to another; from the different shades of a tantrum-throwing, childish revolutionary obsessed with the purity of design and the integrity of engineering to the vulnerable technocrat battling cancer. The book does justice to the life and times of Steve Jobs. The book's recurrent theme of Steve Jobs' erratic managerial style and ability to piss people off does not make him an endearing leader but what makes him incredible are the stories and recollections of his vision and his firm belief in providing consumers with new needs and wants they didn't know existed... repeatedly and successfully!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A great book for a great man.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Love this book
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It is a must read book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
AMAZING!!!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Great book!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
excelente
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The book follow's Steve Job's personal life, which is to say it talks about his beloved company, Apple throughout, since Jobs' modus operandi at Apple has been part of Steve's DNA from the moment his adoptive father showed him that design excellence means getting even the details that nobody sees well crafted. The first half of the book talks about his biological parents and how he came to be adopted. Then about his adoptive parents and his early childhood and propensity for getting into trouble at school, mostly because he was so clever that he was easily bored. Then comes the friendship with Steve Wozniak with who Jobs created the first Apple computer. Wozniak was another genius, and passionate about engineering. Things get very technical to explain their early experimentation with electronics, as we're taken through the process of how the first Apple computer came to be, then the Apple II, then the Lisa, and finally the Macintosh, all created when Jobs was still in his early 20s. To show just how integral Apple was to his life and what a complex personality Jobs was, he named the Lisa after a daughter he had more or less abandoned in his early 20s. His personal life was messy. He studied Zen Buddhism from his late teens, adopted all kinds of extreme vegan diets, experimented a lot with LSD, did the whole India thing, and all these experiences somehow became connected to the products he created. How and why he was ousted from Apple in the 80s is discussed at length and in great detail, with countless quotes and bits of dialogue from many of the players involved, which to me ended up sounding more than anything like office politics being discussed around the water cooler. I've never been a water cooler kind of person, so found that part very irritating. Eventually in the second half, we get to Steve returning to Apple after several failures and the timeline continues to cover both his personal life and the inventions and products he created with the iPod, iTunes, the iTunes store, the Apple stores (which were thought by some analysts to fail miserably after one year), then the creation of the iPhone and finally, the iPad and the iCloud. Of course the last chapters examine his cancer and treatments, and how he eventually came to succumb to the illness. If you, like me, are interested to learn about the thinking behind these revolutionary products, this book is just the ticket for you. If you want a book with plenty of quotes and comments from people who knew and worked with Steve Jobs, along with plenty of comments from the horse's mouth, again, this is the book to go to. I found the evolution of the thinking behind each product and how it came to be designed and produced to be fascinating. But. For the first half of the book, I kept wondering why I was even bothering with it. Jobs comes off as one of the most unlikeable people imaginable. It may be that he was as unpleasant as portrayed, but I found it strange that he didn't seem to have a single redeeming quality, save for his focus on perfection. His personal charm was mentioned casually as just another tool in his arsenal, another means to an end, when the bullying had run it's course. I wish I'd kept track of amount of times the term Reality Distortion Field was mentioned. As says on wikipedia: "RDF was said to distort an audience's sense of proportion and scales of difficulties and made them believe that the task at hand was possible. While RDF has been criticized as anti-reality, those close to Jobs have also illustrated numerous instances in which creating the sense that the seemingly impossible was possible led to the impossible being accomplished." I got the point the first and tenth and fiftieth time.I suppose that Isaacson wanted to be true to Steve Jobs' manner of expression, so the entire book was filled wall to wall with expletives. Although I'm a big fan of Apple products, I don't have a particular bias towards Job; but what grated on me was that his brand of genius as a visionary with faultless design sense and a brilliant marketer didn't seem to carry much weight. Imagine someone writing about Picasso and focusing most of all on what a horrid man he was to others with offhanded mentions of what a brilliant artist he was. Comparing Jobs to Picasso might not be entirely appropriate, but it's undeniable that both men left a legacy that did, and will outlive them both. Yet, Jobs, ever the control freak, repeatedly told Isaacson he would not ask to see the manuscript and would not read the book when it was published, saying he knew there was a lot of it he wouldn't like, but trusting the author would write an accurate portrayal of him. To me, that speaks of a man who accepts himself with all his foibles, and that alone is a quality worthy of admiration.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Not the best written book - could have cut down on some of the stuff. The same point was made over and over again. However, Steve Jobs was an amazing man and his death is an incredible loss. I have never owned an Apple product but now I will!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is positioned at the rare nexus of a brilliant biographer and an amazing subject. I've read several of Isaacson's biographies (Ben Franklin, Albert Einstein), and they never disappoint. He has that rare gift that I have always appreciated in a history teacher of being able to recount the past as an enthralling, engaging story. But with Steve Jobs he completely outdoes himself. The book moves along at a torrid pace. It is not told completely chronologically; but rather as a series of stories about different events. He tells the story of the iPod, then he tells the story of Pixar being sold to Disney, then he tells the story of the early failures of Jobs' health. All three stories overlap in time, but are incredible narratives in their own right.I loved reading about why the Beatles did not permit the sale of their music on iTunes, how Jobs' took the idea of a GUI from Xerox (and Xerox management didn't even mind), the ideological battle over an integrated but closed architecture versus an open but inelegant design, how Job's set aside the creation of the iPad in order to focus on the iPhone.I also enjoyed getting to know what made Jobs tick. He is portrayed with all his flaws; and they are many. This man who changed so much about our world was neither a good boss nor a good husband/father. And yet his employees and his family loved him.I heartily recommend this book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the first biography I have ever read so I do not know how it compares against other biographies, but I am absolutely impressed by the way this book is written. I am neither a Mac nor windows user and I wanted to read this biography to understand why Steven Jobs seemed to be a God. This book portrays Steven Jobs the way people perceived him, no holds barred, no diplomatic language, just raw Jobsian. The highest praise I can give for this book is this: If I ever get a biography done, I want Walter Isaacson to do it
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
There is no doubt Steve Jobs was phenomenal when it came to the products he helped develop at Apple. After being fired from the company he gave birth to he brought Apple back from the brink of bankruptcy in the late 1990's. Thanks to his innovations Apple is now the most valuable company on the face of the Earth. On the other hand, Steve had some troubling character flaws. He had a mercurial personality that rubbed many people the wrong way. He could be brutally honest. There was no middle ground in his world. Your ideas were either brilliant or they sucked. You were a genius or a piece of sh*t. Some would say this helped drive the creative process at Apple. Some of Apple's engineers said this helped push them accomplish things they never dreamed. On the flip side Steve's management style caused many to leave the company. One can only wonder what other things Apple could have accomplished had Steve practiced a more even tempered business approach. Still, he was a brilliant innovator who's leadership left an indelible mark in our world.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Terrific book that will make you miss him even more.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I have been a huge fan of Apple and their products for many years so this book was something I was looking forward to reading.It was very surprising to me to become aware of the type of person Steve Jobs was. The book portrayed a genius with few people skills. It is a compelling look into the life of someone who had such amazing vision and the brilliance with which to pull it off. Unbelievable how he treated those around him in order to achieve the perfection he envisioned.Great read and loved the way it was told with little stories of his dreams and accomplishments over the years.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Knowing very little about Jobs before starting this biography I found the book to be really informative and a nice page-turner. Not only is the Jobs aspect of the book good but I also found it a good broad overview of how the personal computer market became what it is. I would definitely be interested in trying another biography by Isaacson.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The book was well-written and well-sourced. But I wound up really disliking Steve Jobs.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is long, but I really liked it. While I remember most of the ads and changes discussed in this book, learning about it from the Steve Jobs perspective was an interesting chance to reflect on history.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Could not put this book down. As an Apple fan since 1978, the biography made me fell like part of the Apple family . . . like a very poor cousin.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An excellent biography. I have actually developed a deeper appreciation for Jobs and his vision, not to mention his products.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I recently attended a lecture by Walter Isaacson and I found him to be a fascinating speaker and so well informed. He spoke often of Jobs and you could tell the tremndous impact Jobs had on Isaacson. I found the book to be so fasinating with Jobs being a creative genius and a quirky individual who in his own words could be an asshole. The book is very long but well worth the read as it covers Jobs entire life and the history of Apple. Jobs really was behind creating things that changed the world we live in. He was so complex and had such drive and ambition but yet like most creative people he could be completely lost on the simpliest things. There are so many other reviews with more details but if you want a great biography this is it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
To those in the middle of this book, accept my words of encouragement: You may want to bail, but hold your nose and keep going. I read the last sentence myself. I can testify that this book really does eventually end. Keep heart. It's all worth it. You'll be disillusioned with Jobs and liberated from Apple fan-boydom.

This is required reading for anyone attempting to work reflectively in a business context. Like with Gladwell's trilogy, it's full of landmarks useful for thinking with reflective business people. Like Gladwell, you may come close to clawing your face off with the slow pace, the repetition, and excessive gratuitous and compulsive story-winding. But like with Gladwell it actually can be tolerated if you work hard at it, which is more than can be said for most pop business books.

It's best to endure it on audiobook, and let the reader keep the momentum for you.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Isaacson doesn't just tell you who Jobs was and what he did, he explains why he was who was and why he did what he did. Great book, great character study.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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