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This award-winning contemporary classic is the survival story with which all others are compared—and a page-turning, heart-stopping adventure, recipient of the Newbery Honor.

Thirteen-year-old Brian Robeson is on his way to visit his father when the single-engine plane in which he is flying crashes. Suddenly, Brian finds himself alone in the Canadian wilderness with nothing but a tattered Windbreaker and the hatchet his mother gave him as a present—and the dreadful secret that has been tearing him apart since his parent’s divorce. But now Brian has no time for anger, self pity, or despair—it will take all his know-how and determination, and more courage than he knew he possessed, to survive.

Topics: Survival, Adventurous, Canada, Forest, First in a Series, Realistic, Suspenseful, Wilderness, Divorce, Plane Crashes, Coming of Age, Death, Animals, Courage, Family, Hunting, 20th Century, and Stranded

Published: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers on
ISBN: 9781442403321
List price: $7.99
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13-year old Brian's parents are recently divorced and his dad is working in Northern Canada. Brian is on a small plane, going to see his dad when the pilot has a heart attack and dies. The plane goes down somewhere in the Canadian wilderness and Brian survives the crash, but is on his own. I thought this was really good. How would you survive a plane crash if you are left on your own in the wilderness? Who knows what to do to survive? Brian has to figure this all out. I thought the author did a good job of taking Brian through the steps of figuring these things out. I enjoyed “meeting” the various wildlife along the way, as well. It wasn't real fast paced, but I still found it interesting, and it was still quick to read, as it is a YA book.more
Summary: Brian is on a flight to visit his father when the pilot dies of a heart attack. The plane crashes into a lake and Brian has to use a hatchet that his mother gave him in order to survive until help arrives. Personal Reaction: This was a story that seems to always get assigned in class. It’s a pretty deep story about a boy fighting for survival and with kids in this day and age a little hard to believe they may be able to survive in that situation. It is a quick read and would be good for literacy groups. Classroom Extension”1) Have a visitor do demonstrations of how to survive in the wild2) Use this book in literacy circles.more
Entertaining story from my childhood that doesn't really hold up to the test of aging. What I once thought was a great story of a boy coming to grips with survival turned out to be, after 15-years of reading books with grander character arcs, a kind of dumpy story about a boy stranded after a plane crash in the wilderness who conveniently managed, in the years leading up to the crash, to watch the right TV shows and speak to the right people to wake up the next day and be Bear Grylls.

Interspersed with all of this is a sub-plot regarding Brian's parents, their divorce, and "the Secret" he witnessed of his mom cheating on his dad. I really didn't feel like it added anything to the story because very little happened in the subplot, and it did not impact the main plot (the survival) much at all. Brian does some survival-type stuff, is reduced to a pile of tears when he remembers "the Secret", and pushes it away to stay alive. Aside from Brian learning that nature isn't going to coddle a boy with parent issues, it doesn't really have much of a direct impact on the story except to explain why he's in a puddlejumper flying through Canada in the first place.

The ending is abrupt and an extreme deus ex machina. Even though it was barely 100-pages and I knew the ending was coming, the suddenness of the event shocked me.

Rated 3 for nostalgia. I enjoyed it as a 10-year old, and other 10-year olds would too. It doesn't hold up when you're all grown up, though.more
As a middle school teacher, "Hatchet" is my number one recommendation for boys ages 10-15. It delivers because Brian is a protagonist they can understand – an inexperienced, rather panicky boy who proves that he can survive by adapting to a dangerous situation. As a coming-of-age tale it is powerful, and as a source of information about real-life survival it is credible. The author himself ran the Iditarod twice and spent much of his childhood trapping and hiking in the northern wilds. Its relatively short length and steady pacing also recommends it for readers of this age.A good book for everyone, but an excellent one to put in the hands of young adults.more
Paulsen, Gary. Hatchet. New York: Bradbury Press, 1987. Characters: Brian Robeson, the pilot (Jim), Brian’s mother and father, “the man with the short blonde hair”Setting: 1980’s in New York and the Canadian wildernessTheme: coming of age, survival, divorce, new relationships, self-reliance, boy vs natureGenre: YA fiction, adventureGolden quote (optional): “In measured time, 47 days had passed since the crash. Forty-two days, he thought, since he had died and had been born as the new Brian.”Summary: Brian holds a secret about his mother as he flies to have a summer visit with his father in Canada. Brian’s parents are divorced and he contends with new lifestyles going between his parent’s homes. On the flight to his father, the pilot (of a two-seater airplane) dies in flight of a heart attack. Brian survives the landing and has to fend for himself until help arrives. He has a hatchet that his mother gave him and uses it to handle several situations he faces (making fire, defense, etc.). Brian gets the survival pack from the plane after several weeks and finds freeze-dried food. He is eating that food when a seaplane lands on the lake to pick him up. He carries his mother’s secret and does not reveal it to his father.Audience: middle school through high schoolCurriculum ties: language arts (analyzing literature), math, scienceAwards (optional): Newberry Honor Book, ALA Notable Book, Dorothy Canfield Fisher Children’s Book Award, Georgia Children’s Book AwardsPersonal response: It took a bit for me to get into the book, but once I got to Chapter 5, I was hooked. The fact they Brian remembers an English teacher’s advice struck a chord with me. The advice of having a positive attitude is incredibly important for young people. Paulsen uses this motivator to propel Brian’s resilience to survive. It is a theme I use all the time in the classroom. The most interesting thing to me was Brian did not want to reveal his mother’s new boyfriend to his father. An event parallel experienced within my own life.more
Young Adult Literature Review #1Paulson, Gary. Hatchet. New York: Aladdin, 1987Characters: Brian, Brian's mom, dad and the pilot of the planeSetting: On a Cessna in New York, Canadian WildernessTheme: Survival, self-discovery, coming of ageGenre: Realistic FictionGolden Quote: "I have a friend, he thought--I have a friend now. A hungry friend, but a good one. I have a friend named fire."Summary: A young boy named Brian boards a small plane to visit his father for the summer. He leaves with his bags and the gift of a hatchet she had just given to him for the trip into Canada. During the flight, the pilot experiences a heart attack, and Brian must figure out a way to either fly the plane or land it. Brian eventually lands in the middle of the forest and must fend for shelter, food, water, must learn to protect himself from the enemies he encounters in the woods. This is a wonderful story of a young boy believing in himself, and facing his greatest fears in an effort to return to his home and loved ones. Audience: Middle school students; particularly boysCurriculum ties: Relating text to self, plant life, fire/oxygenAwards:Newberry Honor Book - 1988ALA Notable Book - 1987Booklist Editor's Choice Citation - 1988Dorothy Canfield Fisher Children's Book Award - 1989Georgia Children's Book Awards - 1991Young Hoosier Book Awards - 1991Personal response: This book opens with a young boy facing the fact that he knows about his mother's affair, which was the true reason for his parents' divorce. He battles those feelings inside while encountering many challenges. I feel that this would be a wonderful read for my middle school students as it deals with circumstances with which they may be familiar. As far as the body of the novel, I feel that boys in particular would enjoy the adventures Brian has, and they will love the sometimes graphically described scenes.more
Paulsen, Gary. Hatchet. Bradbury, 1987. First of the Brian’s Saga series. Young adult novel. A Newbery Honor book. Film adaptation titled "A Cry in the Wild" (1990).A thirteen year-old Brian Robeson has divorced parents. He is on the plane to visit his father in Canada for summer with a hatchet from his mother. Unfortunately, the pilot dies from heart attack during the flight, which leads Brian to amateurishly land the plane near a lake in the forest. He, left alone with nothing but the hatchet, survives in the forest for 54 days by building a shelter, fighting threats from animals and natural disaster, and hunting food, transforming from a boy who had trouble greasing the bearings on his bicycle to a cautious, tough woodsman. He is later rescued by a fur buyer who caught the emergency transmitter's signal, which he obtained from a survival pack trapped in the sunken plane.Review: A perfect school read. The plot does not have twists and turns that make readers hold their breath and sweat their palms, but the story is solid and teaches lessons. I wish there was a part that depicted how Brian was before the accident to make the comparison to the newly changed Brian more distinctive. I was proud of how he built his surviving techniques upon the lessons he learned from school, documentaries, and movies. I was consistently amused by his strong will to survive. My mouth made a perfect o in horror and disgust when found out that countless fish that sustained him were sustained from the dead pilot’s flesh. Hopefully children will walk away from the novel with not only the importance of staying positive and persistency, but the appreciation of and exposure to nature, duly noting that there are other parts of life besides internet and smartphones.Discussion questions: Why did Brian decide to not tell about the Secret to his father? What do the rifle, hatchet, and fire each represent? Would rifle have changed him once again? How?Tag: : CSULB ETEC 545 Class 1more
This book is about a boy who survived a plane crash and is now alone in the wilderness with only a hatchet to help him.more
The Hatchet is a great novel for middle school readers. The Hatchet is a story about the fight for survival and an important gift Brian receives from his mom that will save his life. This book is interesting. Readers will not want to put it down. Teachers can do many projects with this book like create your own survival tool.more
This book, though slightly graphic, is a wonderful read about perseverance and survival. It follows the story of a young boy that crashes on an island all by himself and must learn to survive and live on his own. This book is wonderfully written and keeps readers excited and focused due to its engaging, descriptive writing style.more
"Hatchet" is a violent, dramatic book that seeks to demonstrate the amazing things that humans can do when they are faced with a life or death situation. The imagery of this book is the most striking component; it projects gory, violent, and cringe-worthy images of human life at its absolute worst. The writing, however, shows humanity at its finest. It shows a teenage boy from New York City who has overcome significant personal obstacles and more difficult situations than the average person will ever face. The author also did a nice job of adding a level of realism to the story, which gives a grim reminder to all readers that this can happen to anybody when they least expect it.more
Hatchet is an amazing story that every child should read! The author tells the story in a way that keeps the reader excited and engaged through out the whole novel. I loved this book when I was growing up. This book would definantly go on my list of best books I have ever read. I would defiantly read thiis book to my students becauuse I believe this book will make kids want to read more because this is exactly what this book did for me when I was growing up.more
This book is about a boy named Brian Robeson that gets stranded in the middle of the wilderness with nothing but the clothes he is wearing and the hatchet his mother gave him. It begins with Brian leaving his mother to spend the summer with his father in the wilderness and that the only thing that is going through his mind is the secret he has known for a while about his mother and another man. After leaving his mother in New York, Brian hits the sky with a pilot that ends up having a heart attack and then dies. Brian is then forced to take over for the captain. Brian is able to direct the plane into the lake to reduce the impact and to overall, save his life. He’s never been camping by himself, but after a while, Brian gets used to it. Brian learns how to have a lot of patience with things and to keep strong in situations.I enjoyed reading this book because it was very realistic and is a page turner. This would be a good mentor text for writing because it encourages lots of descriptive words.more
Hatchet is a perfect example of showing perserverance. Every page is exciting you could never get bored with it. Theres a story around every turn.more
This is an amazing book. The best book I've ever read. Now I understand why it won so many awards.more
Great book! Super descriptive and exiting. Totally recommend it. Worth the 5 stars!more
great book i recomend to people who like adventer booksmore
cant wait to finish.....so excitedmore
Brilliant story that every kid should read. Ideal for boys, but not unpleasant for girls.more
Read this book recently. It is about a boy who winds up being stranded in the wilderness after a plane crash. His only tool: a hatchet. How he learns to survive by painful trial and error and matures in the process makes for a good read.more
This is a book about a boy named Brian Rodeson. His mother and father have had a divorce and he was going to visit his father in in northern Canada. Before he leaves he gets a hatchet from his mother. While on the way, the pilot suffers and heart attack and dies and the plane crashes in to a L-shaped lake. Brain survives the crash but has nothing. He quickly learns how to survive. There were many problems though. He is attacked by and moose, a tornado hits, a bear sees him, and he has to dive into the water to get a survival pack. He survived for 54 days, and lost 17% of his body fat, but one day a pilot finds him and he is safed. This was actually one of the first books I liked. I have never liked reading, but in 4th grade my teacher made us read Hatchet. It was the first book I ever actually wanted to read. I decided to read it again for memories sake.I really like the outdoors, and this was a perfect match. The only thing I don't like about the book is at the beginning there is to much repeating the the word Secret. I understand he is upset with the divorce but I wnat to read about him surviving not him thinking about the past. Overall this is a classic book that is awesome. I would like to think Gary Paulsen for showing me not all books are boring.more
So let me tell you about my experience with this book.First of all, I had to read it for school, like many others before me. Though the overall plot was compelling, if not a little farfetched for me, the way it was written and just everything else about it was just SO BORING I actually fell asleep at some points trying to read this thing for stupid summer reading. I wanted to throw it out the window. It was really tempting.It has a sequel, "The River", which is basically the exact same thing as "The Hatchet", except there is a river involved. Boring.more
Summary: Brian is a thirteen year old boy dealing with his parents divorce. This is the first summer visit to his father's house, in Canada, since the divorce. He flies in an small plane that has just him and the piolit on board. Everything is fine, until the piolit has a heart attack and dies while airborne. Brian is faced with trying to fly the plane and land it somewhere safely. He winds up landing in a wooded area with nobody around. He has to learn to survive in the wild using the skills he learned over the years reading about adventures and surviving techniques. This journey is one Brian will never forget!Personal Reaction:My son, who is thirteen, read the book in fifth and sixth grade. My daugher, who is ten, had also read this book. They both enjoyed it. I thought is was a nice book, but could more quicker.Classroom Extension Ideas:1. Have students make a diaroma of a scene from the book.2. Have students put in a paper bag three things they would like to have with them if they were stranded. They can bring the items to school and share with the class why they chose the items.more
Read all 190 reviews

Reviews

13-year old Brian's parents are recently divorced and his dad is working in Northern Canada. Brian is on a small plane, going to see his dad when the pilot has a heart attack and dies. The plane goes down somewhere in the Canadian wilderness and Brian survives the crash, but is on his own. I thought this was really good. How would you survive a plane crash if you are left on your own in the wilderness? Who knows what to do to survive? Brian has to figure this all out. I thought the author did a good job of taking Brian through the steps of figuring these things out. I enjoyed “meeting” the various wildlife along the way, as well. It wasn't real fast paced, but I still found it interesting, and it was still quick to read, as it is a YA book.more
Summary: Brian is on a flight to visit his father when the pilot dies of a heart attack. The plane crashes into a lake and Brian has to use a hatchet that his mother gave him in order to survive until help arrives. Personal Reaction: This was a story that seems to always get assigned in class. It’s a pretty deep story about a boy fighting for survival and with kids in this day and age a little hard to believe they may be able to survive in that situation. It is a quick read and would be good for literacy groups. Classroom Extension”1) Have a visitor do demonstrations of how to survive in the wild2) Use this book in literacy circles.more
Entertaining story from my childhood that doesn't really hold up to the test of aging. What I once thought was a great story of a boy coming to grips with survival turned out to be, after 15-years of reading books with grander character arcs, a kind of dumpy story about a boy stranded after a plane crash in the wilderness who conveniently managed, in the years leading up to the crash, to watch the right TV shows and speak to the right people to wake up the next day and be Bear Grylls.

Interspersed with all of this is a sub-plot regarding Brian's parents, their divorce, and "the Secret" he witnessed of his mom cheating on his dad. I really didn't feel like it added anything to the story because very little happened in the subplot, and it did not impact the main plot (the survival) much at all. Brian does some survival-type stuff, is reduced to a pile of tears when he remembers "the Secret", and pushes it away to stay alive. Aside from Brian learning that nature isn't going to coddle a boy with parent issues, it doesn't really have much of a direct impact on the story except to explain why he's in a puddlejumper flying through Canada in the first place.

The ending is abrupt and an extreme deus ex machina. Even though it was barely 100-pages and I knew the ending was coming, the suddenness of the event shocked me.

Rated 3 for nostalgia. I enjoyed it as a 10-year old, and other 10-year olds would too. It doesn't hold up when you're all grown up, though.more
As a middle school teacher, "Hatchet" is my number one recommendation for boys ages 10-15. It delivers because Brian is a protagonist they can understand – an inexperienced, rather panicky boy who proves that he can survive by adapting to a dangerous situation. As a coming-of-age tale it is powerful, and as a source of information about real-life survival it is credible. The author himself ran the Iditarod twice and spent much of his childhood trapping and hiking in the northern wilds. Its relatively short length and steady pacing also recommends it for readers of this age.A good book for everyone, but an excellent one to put in the hands of young adults.more
Paulsen, Gary. Hatchet. New York: Bradbury Press, 1987. Characters: Brian Robeson, the pilot (Jim), Brian’s mother and father, “the man with the short blonde hair”Setting: 1980’s in New York and the Canadian wildernessTheme: coming of age, survival, divorce, new relationships, self-reliance, boy vs natureGenre: YA fiction, adventureGolden quote (optional): “In measured time, 47 days had passed since the crash. Forty-two days, he thought, since he had died and had been born as the new Brian.”Summary: Brian holds a secret about his mother as he flies to have a summer visit with his father in Canada. Brian’s parents are divorced and he contends with new lifestyles going between his parent’s homes. On the flight to his father, the pilot (of a two-seater airplane) dies in flight of a heart attack. Brian survives the landing and has to fend for himself until help arrives. He has a hatchet that his mother gave him and uses it to handle several situations he faces (making fire, defense, etc.). Brian gets the survival pack from the plane after several weeks and finds freeze-dried food. He is eating that food when a seaplane lands on the lake to pick him up. He carries his mother’s secret and does not reveal it to his father.Audience: middle school through high schoolCurriculum ties: language arts (analyzing literature), math, scienceAwards (optional): Newberry Honor Book, ALA Notable Book, Dorothy Canfield Fisher Children’s Book Award, Georgia Children’s Book AwardsPersonal response: It took a bit for me to get into the book, but once I got to Chapter 5, I was hooked. The fact they Brian remembers an English teacher’s advice struck a chord with me. The advice of having a positive attitude is incredibly important for young people. Paulsen uses this motivator to propel Brian’s resilience to survive. It is a theme I use all the time in the classroom. The most interesting thing to me was Brian did not want to reveal his mother’s new boyfriend to his father. An event parallel experienced within my own life.more
Young Adult Literature Review #1Paulson, Gary. Hatchet. New York: Aladdin, 1987Characters: Brian, Brian's mom, dad and the pilot of the planeSetting: On a Cessna in New York, Canadian WildernessTheme: Survival, self-discovery, coming of ageGenre: Realistic FictionGolden Quote: "I have a friend, he thought--I have a friend now. A hungry friend, but a good one. I have a friend named fire."Summary: A young boy named Brian boards a small plane to visit his father for the summer. He leaves with his bags and the gift of a hatchet she had just given to him for the trip into Canada. During the flight, the pilot experiences a heart attack, and Brian must figure out a way to either fly the plane or land it. Brian eventually lands in the middle of the forest and must fend for shelter, food, water, must learn to protect himself from the enemies he encounters in the woods. This is a wonderful story of a young boy believing in himself, and facing his greatest fears in an effort to return to his home and loved ones. Audience: Middle school students; particularly boysCurriculum ties: Relating text to self, plant life, fire/oxygenAwards:Newberry Honor Book - 1988ALA Notable Book - 1987Booklist Editor's Choice Citation - 1988Dorothy Canfield Fisher Children's Book Award - 1989Georgia Children's Book Awards - 1991Young Hoosier Book Awards - 1991Personal response: This book opens with a young boy facing the fact that he knows about his mother's affair, which was the true reason for his parents' divorce. He battles those feelings inside while encountering many challenges. I feel that this would be a wonderful read for my middle school students as it deals with circumstances with which they may be familiar. As far as the body of the novel, I feel that boys in particular would enjoy the adventures Brian has, and they will love the sometimes graphically described scenes.more
Paulsen, Gary. Hatchet. Bradbury, 1987. First of the Brian’s Saga series. Young adult novel. A Newbery Honor book. Film adaptation titled "A Cry in the Wild" (1990).A thirteen year-old Brian Robeson has divorced parents. He is on the plane to visit his father in Canada for summer with a hatchet from his mother. Unfortunately, the pilot dies from heart attack during the flight, which leads Brian to amateurishly land the plane near a lake in the forest. He, left alone with nothing but the hatchet, survives in the forest for 54 days by building a shelter, fighting threats from animals and natural disaster, and hunting food, transforming from a boy who had trouble greasing the bearings on his bicycle to a cautious, tough woodsman. He is later rescued by a fur buyer who caught the emergency transmitter's signal, which he obtained from a survival pack trapped in the sunken plane.Review: A perfect school read. The plot does not have twists and turns that make readers hold their breath and sweat their palms, but the story is solid and teaches lessons. I wish there was a part that depicted how Brian was before the accident to make the comparison to the newly changed Brian more distinctive. I was proud of how he built his surviving techniques upon the lessons he learned from school, documentaries, and movies. I was consistently amused by his strong will to survive. My mouth made a perfect o in horror and disgust when found out that countless fish that sustained him were sustained from the dead pilot’s flesh. Hopefully children will walk away from the novel with not only the importance of staying positive and persistency, but the appreciation of and exposure to nature, duly noting that there are other parts of life besides internet and smartphones.Discussion questions: Why did Brian decide to not tell about the Secret to his father? What do the rifle, hatchet, and fire each represent? Would rifle have changed him once again? How?Tag: : CSULB ETEC 545 Class 1more
This book is about a boy who survived a plane crash and is now alone in the wilderness with only a hatchet to help him.more
The Hatchet is a great novel for middle school readers. The Hatchet is a story about the fight for survival and an important gift Brian receives from his mom that will save his life. This book is interesting. Readers will not want to put it down. Teachers can do many projects with this book like create your own survival tool.more
This book, though slightly graphic, is a wonderful read about perseverance and survival. It follows the story of a young boy that crashes on an island all by himself and must learn to survive and live on his own. This book is wonderfully written and keeps readers excited and focused due to its engaging, descriptive writing style.more
"Hatchet" is a violent, dramatic book that seeks to demonstrate the amazing things that humans can do when they are faced with a life or death situation. The imagery of this book is the most striking component; it projects gory, violent, and cringe-worthy images of human life at its absolute worst. The writing, however, shows humanity at its finest. It shows a teenage boy from New York City who has overcome significant personal obstacles and more difficult situations than the average person will ever face. The author also did a nice job of adding a level of realism to the story, which gives a grim reminder to all readers that this can happen to anybody when they least expect it.more
Hatchet is an amazing story that every child should read! The author tells the story in a way that keeps the reader excited and engaged through out the whole novel. I loved this book when I was growing up. This book would definantly go on my list of best books I have ever read. I would defiantly read thiis book to my students becauuse I believe this book will make kids want to read more because this is exactly what this book did for me when I was growing up.more
This book is about a boy named Brian Robeson that gets stranded in the middle of the wilderness with nothing but the clothes he is wearing and the hatchet his mother gave him. It begins with Brian leaving his mother to spend the summer with his father in the wilderness and that the only thing that is going through his mind is the secret he has known for a while about his mother and another man. After leaving his mother in New York, Brian hits the sky with a pilot that ends up having a heart attack and then dies. Brian is then forced to take over for the captain. Brian is able to direct the plane into the lake to reduce the impact and to overall, save his life. He’s never been camping by himself, but after a while, Brian gets used to it. Brian learns how to have a lot of patience with things and to keep strong in situations.I enjoyed reading this book because it was very realistic and is a page turner. This would be a good mentor text for writing because it encourages lots of descriptive words.more
Hatchet is a perfect example of showing perserverance. Every page is exciting you could never get bored with it. Theres a story around every turn.more
This is an amazing book. The best book I've ever read. Now I understand why it won so many awards.more
Great book! Super descriptive and exiting. Totally recommend it. Worth the 5 stars!more
great book i recomend to people who like adventer booksmore
cant wait to finish.....so excitedmore
Brilliant story that every kid should read. Ideal for boys, but not unpleasant for girls.more
Read this book recently. It is about a boy who winds up being stranded in the wilderness after a plane crash. His only tool: a hatchet. How he learns to survive by painful trial and error and matures in the process makes for a good read.more
This is a book about a boy named Brian Rodeson. His mother and father have had a divorce and he was going to visit his father in in northern Canada. Before he leaves he gets a hatchet from his mother. While on the way, the pilot suffers and heart attack and dies and the plane crashes in to a L-shaped lake. Brain survives the crash but has nothing. He quickly learns how to survive. There were many problems though. He is attacked by and moose, a tornado hits, a bear sees him, and he has to dive into the water to get a survival pack. He survived for 54 days, and lost 17% of his body fat, but one day a pilot finds him and he is safed. This was actually one of the first books I liked. I have never liked reading, but in 4th grade my teacher made us read Hatchet. It was the first book I ever actually wanted to read. I decided to read it again for memories sake.I really like the outdoors, and this was a perfect match. The only thing I don't like about the book is at the beginning there is to much repeating the the word Secret. I understand he is upset with the divorce but I wnat to read about him surviving not him thinking about the past. Overall this is a classic book that is awesome. I would like to think Gary Paulsen for showing me not all books are boring.more
So let me tell you about my experience with this book.First of all, I had to read it for school, like many others before me. Though the overall plot was compelling, if not a little farfetched for me, the way it was written and just everything else about it was just SO BORING I actually fell asleep at some points trying to read this thing for stupid summer reading. I wanted to throw it out the window. It was really tempting.It has a sequel, "The River", which is basically the exact same thing as "The Hatchet", except there is a river involved. Boring.more
Summary: Brian is a thirteen year old boy dealing with his parents divorce. This is the first summer visit to his father's house, in Canada, since the divorce. He flies in an small plane that has just him and the piolit on board. Everything is fine, until the piolit has a heart attack and dies while airborne. Brian is faced with trying to fly the plane and land it somewhere safely. He winds up landing in a wooded area with nobody around. He has to learn to survive in the wild using the skills he learned over the years reading about adventures and surviving techniques. This journey is one Brian will never forget!Personal Reaction:My son, who is thirteen, read the book in fifth and sixth grade. My daugher, who is ten, had also read this book. They both enjoyed it. I thought is was a nice book, but could more quicker.Classroom Extension Ideas:1. Have students make a diaroma of a scene from the book.2. Have students put in a paper bag three things they would like to have with them if they were stranded. They can bring the items to school and share with the class why they chose the items.more
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