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Proving once again that she is a master of suspense, bestselling author Colleen McCullough returns with a riveting sequel to On, Off.

The year is 1967, and the world teeters on the brink of nuclear holocaust as the Cold War goes relentlessly on. On a beautiful spring day in the little city of Holloman, Connecticut, home to prestigious Chubb University and armaments giant Cornucopia, chief of detectives Captain Carmine Delmonico has more pressing concerns than finding a name for his infant son: twelve murders have taken place in one day, and Delmonico is drawn into a gruesome web of secrets and lies.

Supported by his detective sergeants Abe Goldberg and Corey Marshall and new team member the meticulous Delia Carstairs, Delmonico embarks on what looks like an unsolvable mystery. All the murders are different and they all seem unconnected. Are they dealing with one killer, or many? How is the murder of Dee-Dee Hall, a local prostitute, related to the deaths of a mother and her disabled child? How is Chubb student Evan Pugh connected to Desmond Skeps, head of Cornucopia? And as if twelve murders were not enough, Carmine soon finds himself pitted against the mysterious Ulysses, a spy giving Cornucopia's armaments secrets to the Russians. Are the murders and espionage different cases, or are they somehow linked?

When FBI special agent Ted Kelly makes himself part of the investigation, it appears the stakes are far higher than anyone had imagined, and murder is only one part of the puzzle in the set of crimes that has sent Holloman into a panic. As the overtaxed police force contends with small town politics, academic rivalry and corporate greed, the death toll mounts, and Carmine and his team discover that the answers are not what they seem -- but then, are they ever?
Published: Simon & Schuster on Dec 1, 2009
ISBN: 9781439178294
List price: $7.99
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An interesting murder mystery, the second in a series, I think, starring her grounded family man, Detective Carmine Delmonico. The stories are set in the 60's and the settings and the dialogue stay true to the time period and the innocence that still permeated the lives of many of the characters while allowing the violence and brutality of the crimes being solved to seem all the more terrible in contrast. The subtle quaint air McCullough lends to her detective and his friends, especially his spirited new wife Desdemona keeps the reader aware of the difference between then and now. Carmine has a strong appreciation for his new wife and late in life baby,Julian, as well as adoring his teenage daughter from a previous marriage,Sophia, lending additional suspense to the unfolding drama. Will the current criminal discover his weak point, his love for his family, and strike where he could be hurt most? I found the unfolding story to be most entertaining and the actual solving of the crime almost secondary. I would recommend the first in the series, On,Off by Colleen MCullough and then this one by which time they will be well acquainted with the detective and his family and friends.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Holloman CT, a small university town, is overwhelmed with a dozen murders in one 24 hour period on April 3, 1967. There doesn't seem to be any kind of connection - the victims range from the CEO of a major conglomerate to an 18 month old Down Syndrome baby. None of the victims is killed in the same manner, but Carmine Delmonico, the head of the homicide division in the town is sure there has to be a connection.The investigation into each death and eventual connections, draws Delmonico and others into a dangerous and threatening situations. The reader is taken on a roller coaster ride of questions and answers that eventually lead to a satisfactory conclusion.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Too Many Murders is the second of McCullough's novels to feature Captain Carmine Delmonico and the police force of Holloman Connecticut. It opens on the 3rd of April 1967. A young student at the small city’s prestigious university is killed in a particularly gruesome way. One nasty murder would be enough to cope with in the relatively crime free city but there are 11 other murders on the same day and the small police force is stretched beyond its limits. Despite the fact that there are a variety of methods used and none of the victims appear to have anything in common Carmine Delmonico begins to suspect that there is a single person responsible for all of the deaths.

To say the book’s plot is complicated is something of an understatement. Between the alarming body count (it keeps growing after that first day) and the seemingly endless twists and turns you do feel the need to have a notebook by your side, especially in the first third of the book. Complicated is what McCullough does well though and it all does resolve itself in a satisfying way. However I’d have to admit that by incorporating so many murders and associated investigations the book has skimped a little on its tackling of the big-picture social and political issues which are intertwined with the story. Things like the women’s liberation movement and the cold war between the US and Russia are present more superficially than I’d expect from McCullough and there are tangential threads that could easily have been omitted in order to address such issues more deeply.

There are some fabulous characters though. Again, perhaps a few less would have enabled us to get to know some of them more deeply, but Carmine Delmonico and his wife, Desdemona, are thoroughly engaging, As the book opens they have yet to agree on a name for their 5 month old baby boy but their gentle arguing about the issue shows they have a quite lovely relationship which is an equal partnership possibly a little ahead of its time. Delmonico is a dedicated cop and caring about his subordinates as well as being a doting husband and father. If anything he’s a bit too perfect, also being extremely intelligent, but I can see him as a bit of an homage to the golden age private investigators like Hercule Poirot (I’ve been to see McCullough speak twice and on both occasions she has talked of her love for a good whodunnit). There’s a fabulous female ‘civilian’ working with the police called Delia Carstairs (who is eventually deputised and is instrumental in solving the case) and a cast of other intriguing heroes, villains and bit players.

I managed to keep track of this tale in the well-narrated audio version but due to the complexity of the tale I wouldn’t recommend it for audio book novices. Any way you read it though I would highly recommend this romp of a yarn with its larger than life characters and absurdly complicated story full of criminal masterminds, cold war espionage and heroic investigators.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A good read despite plot being too long, and detective thinking like a woman.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Aptly titled, there were almost too many murders to keep track of in this mystery. At first I thought I'd never be able to keep all the players straight without a scorecard, but that proved to be an unfounded worry. Suddenly on April 3rd, twelve people are murdered in the small town of Holloman Connecticut. Police detective Captain Carmine Delmonico is faced with not only trying to solve each of them, but trying to figure out whether the police are dealing with one murderer or twelve totally unrelated deaths. Each murder was separate in place, method, and discovery. Some of the victims worked together, but others seemed to have no connection to any of the others.McCullough uses some very interesting police investigative techniques that allow the reader to track these crimes and the police who are tasked with finding the answers. In doing so, we are quickly and aptly able to follow all the separate threads. It was a tightly woven story that kept me on the edge of my chair, and surprised me several times. Even the very ending is a surprise. I will not spoil it any more than that. And I will definitely be going to look for others in this series.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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An interesting murder mystery, the second in a series, I think, starring her grounded family man, Detective Carmine Delmonico. The stories are set in the 60's and the settings and the dialogue stay true to the time period and the innocence that still permeated the lives of many of the characters while allowing the violence and brutality of the crimes being solved to seem all the more terrible in contrast. The subtle quaint air McCullough lends to her detective and his friends, especially his spirited new wife Desdemona keeps the reader aware of the difference between then and now. Carmine has a strong appreciation for his new wife and late in life baby,Julian, as well as adoring his teenage daughter from a previous marriage,Sophia, lending additional suspense to the unfolding drama. Will the current criminal discover his weak point, his love for his family, and strike where he could be hurt most? I found the unfolding story to be most entertaining and the actual solving of the crime almost secondary. I would recommend the first in the series, On,Off by Colleen MCullough and then this one by which time they will be well acquainted with the detective and his family and friends.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Holloman CT, a small university town, is overwhelmed with a dozen murders in one 24 hour period on April 3, 1967. There doesn't seem to be any kind of connection - the victims range from the CEO of a major conglomerate to an 18 month old Down Syndrome baby. None of the victims is killed in the same manner, but Carmine Delmonico, the head of the homicide division in the town is sure there has to be a connection.The investigation into each death and eventual connections, draws Delmonico and others into a dangerous and threatening situations. The reader is taken on a roller coaster ride of questions and answers that eventually lead to a satisfactory conclusion.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Too Many Murders is the second of McCullough's novels to feature Captain Carmine Delmonico and the police force of Holloman Connecticut. It opens on the 3rd of April 1967. A young student at the small city’s prestigious university is killed in a particularly gruesome way. One nasty murder would be enough to cope with in the relatively crime free city but there are 11 other murders on the same day and the small police force is stretched beyond its limits. Despite the fact that there are a variety of methods used and none of the victims appear to have anything in common Carmine Delmonico begins to suspect that there is a single person responsible for all of the deaths.

To say the book’s plot is complicated is something of an understatement. Between the alarming body count (it keeps growing after that first day) and the seemingly endless twists and turns you do feel the need to have a notebook by your side, especially in the first third of the book. Complicated is what McCullough does well though and it all does resolve itself in a satisfying way. However I’d have to admit that by incorporating so many murders and associated investigations the book has skimped a little on its tackling of the big-picture social and political issues which are intertwined with the story. Things like the women’s liberation movement and the cold war between the US and Russia are present more superficially than I’d expect from McCullough and there are tangential threads that could easily have been omitted in order to address such issues more deeply.

There are some fabulous characters though. Again, perhaps a few less would have enabled us to get to know some of them more deeply, but Carmine Delmonico and his wife, Desdemona, are thoroughly engaging, As the book opens they have yet to agree on a name for their 5 month old baby boy but their gentle arguing about the issue shows they have a quite lovely relationship which is an equal partnership possibly a little ahead of its time. Delmonico is a dedicated cop and caring about his subordinates as well as being a doting husband and father. If anything he’s a bit too perfect, also being extremely intelligent, but I can see him as a bit of an homage to the golden age private investigators like Hercule Poirot (I’ve been to see McCullough speak twice and on both occasions she has talked of her love for a good whodunnit). There’s a fabulous female ‘civilian’ working with the police called Delia Carstairs (who is eventually deputised and is instrumental in solving the case) and a cast of other intriguing heroes, villains and bit players.

I managed to keep track of this tale in the well-narrated audio version but due to the complexity of the tale I wouldn’t recommend it for audio book novices. Any way you read it though I would highly recommend this romp of a yarn with its larger than life characters and absurdly complicated story full of criminal masterminds, cold war espionage and heroic investigators.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A good read despite plot being too long, and detective thinking like a woman.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Aptly titled, there were almost too many murders to keep track of in this mystery. At first I thought I'd never be able to keep all the players straight without a scorecard, but that proved to be an unfounded worry. Suddenly on April 3rd, twelve people are murdered in the small town of Holloman Connecticut. Police detective Captain Carmine Delmonico is faced with not only trying to solve each of them, but trying to figure out whether the police are dealing with one murderer or twelve totally unrelated deaths. Each murder was separate in place, method, and discovery. Some of the victims worked together, but others seemed to have no connection to any of the others.McCullough uses some very interesting police investigative techniques that allow the reader to track these crimes and the police who are tasked with finding the answers. In doing so, we are quickly and aptly able to follow all the separate threads. It was a tightly woven story that kept me on the edge of my chair, and surprised me several times. Even the very ending is a surprise. I will not spoil it any more than that. And I will definitely be going to look for others in this series.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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