From the Publisher

The only reporter present at the mythic Paris Tasting of 1976—a blind tasting where a panel of esteemed French judges chose upstart California wines over France’s best—for the first time introduces the eccentric American winemakers and records the tremendous aftershocks of this historic event that changed forever the world of wine.

The Paris Tasting of 1976 will forever be remembered as the landmark event that transformed the wine industry. At this legendary contest—a blind tasting—a panel of top French wine experts shocked the industry by choosing unknown California wines over France’s best.

George M. Taber, the only reporter present, recounts this seminal contest and its far-reaching effects, focusing on three gifted unknowns behind the winning wines: a college lecturer, a real estate lawyer, and a Yugoslavian immigrant. With unique access to the main players and a contagious passion for his subject, Taber renders this historic event and its tremendous aftershocks—repositioning the industry and sparking a golden age for viticulture across the globe. With an eclectic cast of characters and magnificent settings, Judgment of Paris is an illuminating tale and a story of the entrepreneurial spirit of the new world conquering the old.
Published: Scribner on
ISBN: 9781416547891
List price: $14.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Judgment of Paris by George M. Taber
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Bloomberg Businessweek
3 min read
Food & Wine

The Perfect Pour

So, you want to buy a bottle of wine. You sort of know what you like—bold reds, crisp whites—but not much more than the names of a few grapes. You head to your local wine shop, which, being a proper local wine shop, has a dizzying array of options: reds from Oregon, Argentina, and Italy; whites from South Africa, New York state, and California; bubbly from France. How can you be sure your money will be well spent? You approach the counter, where the cashier is smiling in anticipation of the question she knows is coming: Umm, could you help me out? Dustin Wilson thinks there’s a better way to
Nautilus
11 min read

The Neuroscience of Wine: Why our minds can be led astray about the tastes of wines.

Galileo Galilei is best known for his novel way of looking at Earth’s place in the solar system and his consequent problems with the Vatican. But long before all the fuss blew up over his cosmology, Galileo told us that while the physical attributes of the planet are present, they are perceptually nonexistent until they have been interpreted by our senses. This theory applies to wine as much as to anything else, and Galileo, who described wine as “sunlight, held together by water,” did not forget that fact. As he put it, “A wine’s good taste does not belong to the objective determinations of t
NPR
4 min read

Oaky, With Notes Of BS: Why Wine Tasting Struggles To Get It On The Nose

To get you to buy a bottle of champagne, M. Cole Chilton, the face who was always behind the counter of my neighborhood wine store in Brooklyn, would send out emails with elaborate descriptions: "I taste like sunshine, and I tell of brighter days ahead. I will make you forget that three people cheated on you last year. I will make you forget that you didn't contribute anything to your 401(k). I will make you forget that dog sitting is not as easy as it sounds." Rarely have I gotten so much enjoyment from a newsletter, but also, rarely have I been so confused. Did I want to buy these wines that