This title is not available in your country

We’re working with the publisher to make it available as soon as possible.

Request Title

Editor’s Note

“Rich & Intimate...”

History buffs rejoice: Gregory’s rich portrait of a previously forgotten aristocrat offers an intimate look at life in Tudor times.
Niree N.
Scribd Editor
The #1 New York Times bestseller from “the queen of royal fiction” (USA TODAY) Philippa Gregory is a rich, compelling novel of love, sex, ambition, and intrigue surrounding the Tudor court of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn, and the infamous Boleyn family.

When Mary Boleyn comes to court as an innocent girl of fourteen, she catches the eye of the handsome and charming Henry VIII. Dazzled by the king, Mary falls in love with both her golden prince and her growing role as unofficial queen. However, she soon realizes just how much she is a pawn in her family’s ambitious plots as the king’s interest begins to wane, and soon she is forced to step aside for her best friend and rival: her sister, Anne. With her own destiny suddenly unknown, Mary realizes that she must defy her family and take fate into her own hands.

With more than one million copies in print and adapted for the big screen, The Other Boleyn Girl is a riveting historical drama. It brings to light a woman of extraordinary determination and desire who lived at the heart of the most exciting and glamorous court in Europe, and survived a treacherous political landscape by following her heart.

Topics: England, Tudor Period, Steamy, Romantic, The Tudors, Royalty, Sisters, Made into a Movie, Sibling Rivalry, Family, Love Triangle, Illegitimate Children, Women in History, Kings, Adultery, Betrayal, British Author, and Henry VIII

Published: Touchstone on Nov 9, 2004
ISBN: 9780743233088
List price: $10.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Other Boleyn Girl
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

I know it's a novel, but honestly, I know top much of the history to enjoy it. I mean, Gregory treats Anne's fostering of Mary's son as an adoption in the modern sense, which wasn't how it worked. Fostering between families and with relatives was common practice in that time. read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An amazing read following the life of Mary Boleyn, little sister to the infamous Anne Boleyn, as her and her sister's lives come to intertwine with that of Henry VIII. A must-readread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm a little torn about this book. It was definitely a page-turner and I could fall into it quite easily. I could identify with the narrator, Mary, and follow her thought process every step of the way. I was occasionally surprised at how much I could read in one sitting. But I had some problems with it as well. About halfway through, Mary stops caring about the court and all she wants to do is be at the family home of Hever with her children. This is all fine and well, but all the action that she reports on and that is vital to the plot happens at court. So we get pages and pages and pages of court dealings we're given no reason to care about and, if we're lucky, a few paragraphs of her summers at Hever. I was annoyed that the detail seemed to come into the wrong places at many times. Overall though, if you're looking for historical fiction and don't mind trudging through some things, go for it.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Other Boleyn Girl is this month’s book club selection. This is a work of historical fiction told from the perspective of Mary Boleyn, the little known sister of Anne Boleyn. Anne married Henry VIII and became Queen of England. She was ultimately charged with adultery and witchcraft and executed at the Tower of London. On the face of it, this book should’ve been right up my alley as it is one of my favorite genres. The novel started well but I felt that it quickly deteriorated from a work of historical fiction to pure romance novel. Having read a fair number of romance novels during my teenage years, I saw many similarities. Devastating beautiful but headstrong heroine. Man persues her. She plays hard to get. There is a chase. Man eventually gets the girl. Etc. etc. I’ve read that Gregory took great liberties with the facts despite citing numerous historical works as reference. I find this odd because although other authors of historical fiction frequently do the same…I don’t recall them citing as many references. In citing references, I think you are leading the reader to believe that you are sticking to many of the facts. Anyhow, since I’m not a Tudor era historian of anything, I don’t really care what Gregory has made up to make the story more interesting. I just care that I didn’t really enjoy this book as much as I thought I would. It was interesting (or depressing) to see how little freedom women had back in the day and were nothing to their families but pawns in the marriage game. Life at court must have been so exhausting with your every move being scrutinized and gossiped about. This you definitely don’t see in a traditional romance novel so this is where Gregory’s book does differ and is a step above. She has also piqued my interest in the Tudor family and I’d be interested to know more about the reign of Elizabeth I, the daughter of Anne and Henry. How does Elizabeth ascend the throne after her mother is beheaded? Your favor in court can really change as quickly as the weather.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book left me breathless. I zoomed through the last 150 to 200 pages or so in one sitting, unable to put it down and racing for the conclusion. I don't know why I don't read historical fiction more often. I love history and I love fiction. Plus, historical fiction gives you an insider's view into the lives of past figures in a way you would never see them. Don't get me wrong, I know that most of this stuff is made up, but it is somewhat based on fact (sometimes more than others). Reading history books in school or any sort of non-fiction book on history always leaves me wanting more. The people I read or hear about are nothing more than names printed next to dates. I can know when they lived and what they did and what their general occupations were, but I still don't get a good look at who they really were. That's why I love stories. Especially stories like this. The era of Henry VIII (he was big enough to be considered an era, right?) is insanely fascinating, but anything I read in a non-fiction or history book is going to make me bored. Don't just tell me the facts. Immerse me in the culture and fashion and scandals and views and opinions of the time. This book does all of that and then some. I couldn't believe the intensity of this novel, how real the characters became, how I could understand what they were going through, and then how I could better understand the time period because of it. I may not know all the facts concerning Mary and Anne Boleyn and their family, but I do understand how they might have acted this way in a time when religion came under a king's reign instead of the pope's and it truly was a man's world. And, to give it even more praise, this book made me actually want to pick up a history book and learn more about these women and this time.I had heard that the movie was set to be released Dec. 21 from this site where I found the picture, but IMDb.com says it's not set to release until Feb. 29, 2008. Since I haven't seen any trailers or heard anything about it in the media, I'm going to believe IMDb, which is unfortunate because I am a very impatient person. (Personal note: I think Natalie Portman would make a great Anne Boleyn, and I am highly anticipating her role.)I will definitely be reading more of Gregory's work, and I have a feeling that I may have to reread some parts in order to see how some of the characters overlap (I think next up will be The Boleyn Inheritance). Has anyone else read this book or any others of Gregory's? What are your thoughts/opinions? And, for my own personal knowledge, are her books in some sort of order, or does it not matter which ones you read first?5 out of 5 stars.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I didn't expect to like this book as much as I did. The book is a wonderful fluff book -- history, intrigue, royal politics, and romance. While the book is, in most respects, a soap opera set in Tudor England, it was completely engrossing to read. I'll definitely look out for the other books from this series for the next time I have a long plane or train ride. I'd recommend this to almost anyone.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I LOVED this book. As is so often the case, this book was so much better than the movie. The novel flows well and has great character development. It is narrated by Mary and Gregory masterfully and seamlessly matures her narration with the story. I became so interested and attached to the characters that I didn't want to put the book down, and was sad when it was finished.Gregory's type and style of story reminds me slightly of Ken Folett, whom I also enjoy.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book was just wonderful - it painted such a vivid picture of life in England during the days of Anne Boleyn and it was impossible to put this book down.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Other Boleyn Girl is a largely fictional narrative retelling of Anne and Mary Boleyn and Henry VIII. Even though the book employed a lot of hypothesising, conjecture and artistic license, I learnt a lot about the period because it interested me enough that I followed up with a bit of further research (I previously knew very little). So I found it both entertaining and educational. The writing was entirely adequate, though not excellent.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A cut above the average historical saga, this deals with the notorious Anne Boleyn and how her ambitious family set schemes in place to see a Boleyn on the throne besides Henry the VIII. My first Philippa Gregory and not the last; immensely readable, the historical details feel accurate and the prose just washes over you gripping you in the plot as the best books should. Told from Mary, Anne's sister's perspective, who becomes Henry's mistress while he is married to Katherine of Aragorn, this doesn't make the best portrayal of Anne Boleyn's character but is an absolute page turner. Even if you're not a fan of historical fiction this provides enough twists and intrigue to entertain and reads like a Tudor soap opera but in a good way.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Passionate, clever and perfectly detailed. I love everything about this book. Philippa Gregory never disappoints me no matter in what period of time or genre.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This started out as a typical historical-fiction romp, but towards the end Gregory's fine writting produces a heart-wrenching and suspenseful climax -- even when you know how the story ends. Good characterization for most of the major characters and skillful weaving of the plot lines make the story flow. I do agree that it could have been edited down a bit...too much repetition....and of course some of the historical details are a bit blurry....but Gregory is clever to have this story of Anne Boleyn's rise and fall be narrated by a lesser known historical personage so she has a litte more play with details. Enjoyable.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Loved it. Was the first book I read in the Tudor series and now have read all of them. I knew about Anne but loved learning about Mary and Catherine Carey.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I would give the first half of this book 2, maybe 3 stars and the 2nd half, four stars so if you're struggling with caring about what happens to any of these characters, stick with it. I finally started to care about Mary after she fell in love with William and wanted to make a life for herself. Some parts of the book I relished in, while some parts I just had to forget about as soon as I read it.
To the argument that the author took many liberties with the story and distorted some facts, it is historical FICTION!! I don't think I would use it to teach a history lesson.
All in all, it was an entertaining read.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
1500's Period Piece. Very well done.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I was intrigued by the idea of reading a book about Mary Boleyn. Unfortunately, this is a book mostly about Anne Boleyn, as narrated by Mary - the book ends with Anne and George Boleyn's beheading, although Mary survived them by a number of years. I was really disappointed by this; I would actually have been more interested in reading about her later life, which is rarely covered in history books. Ah well, I see that Karen Harper's Passion's Reign, recently reissued as The Last Boleyn has gotten good reviews; I'll give that a shot. It's not very good history - I give it three stars only because it was it was readable and held my interest at the beach. When I got home, I rushed to my books on the Tudors; no, I was not remembering wrong, this is filled with errors, as other reviewers have pointed out. I will point out another: I know of no evidence that Anne wanted to adopt her nephew, nor do I think it would have made her more valuable to Henry. Outside of the fact that it is not clear that the boy was Henry's son, he already had an acknowledged illegitimate son, Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond. Henry seems to have doubted that he could successfully leave the throne to Richmond, so I cannot see how the belated acknowledgement of another illegitimate son would help. Her nephew was Anne's ward, but widows were not usually the guardians of their minor children at this point, indeed they were often given into the "care" of avaricious strangers, so it seems as likely that Anne was being protective as predatory. I leave it to the reader to decide whether historical inaccuracies bother them or not, but I think they should be aware of them. Gregory occasionally picks up on some interesting angles: Mary is somewhat ambivalent about Katharine of Aragon. On the one hand, her family is trying to bring about the Queen's downfall, on the other, she admires Katharine and feels guilty about her participation. I also liked the scenes of Mary with her grandmother when she is in exile from the court. I am something of an Anne Boleyn fan, but I understand why people don't like her. What I can't understand is that none of the anti-Anne writers seem to be able to imagine her as a three dimensional person - I thought that writers always had trouble making the virtuous as interesting as the villainous. Anne should at least be a clever and alluring (but not beautiful) seductress a la Milady DeWinter in the Three Musqueteers. In this book, as in Suzanne Dann's Queen of Subtleties and numerous others, Anne is once again a caricature of a shrill, coarse harpy - how could Henry have stood a single hour with such a person? The story is a bit crude and torrid for my tastes - the sex scenes were too many and too detailed and sometimes downright implausible. The relationship between the sisters never makes much sense - it's not so much complex as inconsistent. Overlooking the historical errors, it's not a particularly good novel, but certainly not the worst that I've read. It certainly didn't inspire me to read more of Philippa Gregory. I finally picked up her novel about Katharine of Aragon, but I didn't think that it was even as good as this. For Philippa Gregory fans and people (and we are legion) who read just about anything set during this era.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Although it is fairly trashy, the fact that it is based on a historical story and setting gives the book a lot of intrigue. The history of Henry VIII is fascinating and Philippa Greogory tells an interesting story. I really wonder if the theory/reason that it is suggested in the book and one other historian as to why Anne Boleyn is beheaded is true.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A good read. Ann Boleyn's story told from Mary Boleyn's perspective.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Phillipa Gregory has so many admirers I decided I had to give her a second chance. I'm glad I did.The Other Boleyn Girl is an artistically woven tapestry of historical fiction and fact surrounding Henry VIII's dismissal of his first and longest standing wife, Katherine of Aragon, and the rise and fall of Anne Boleyn, his second wife, told through the eyes of Mary, Anne's younger sister and mother to two of the king's children.There are characters you'll love (like Queen Katherine and Mary Boleyn) and characters you'll love to hate (Anne and her Uncle). Even the peripheral characters, like Grandma Howard, are fleshed out with interesting quirks and personal descriptions.Palace intrigue abounds. There are multiple mistresses vying for the crown jewels, the jockeying for position of the Seymore and Howard/Boleyn families, the carousing of young men of court caught up in gambling, whoring, buggery, wine, and song, the begetting of several illegitimate heirs, the loss of innocence, the discovery of love, and, of course, beheadings. All of this followed by a happy ending--at least for our heroine, Mary!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I was truly intrigued by the concept of sisters Mary and Anne Boleyn, in turn, being viewed as "The Other Boleyn Girl" by both family and court, and how that affected their motivation and fueled rivalries. I also bought the premise behind brother George's various contributions to the story. However, I was less sold on Mary's portrayal, firstly, as the younger sister; and, secondly, as lacking in courtly sophistication. Various other inconsistencies with mainstream historical sources were also distracting. Judging from this novel, "The Queen's Fool" and "The Constant Princess," it's evident that Ms. Gregory keeps her 'artistic license' within easy reach, and that tends to lessen my enjoyment of her stories. Still, "The Other Boleyn Girl" is a gripping read, and IMHO the best of Ms. Gregory's Tudor-era-based fiction.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Tudor royalty has always held a fascination for me. This is a familiar story - told from an unusual point of view. I knew (from Victoria Holt's novel of Katherine) that Henry had Anne's sister Mary for a mistress, but having Mary tell the story is very interesting. The ruthlessness of the Boleyn family (with the Howards) was brilliantly portrayed through Mary's eyes.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Facing more than 500 pages in a genre I don't typically enjoy, I questioned whether I'd be able to finish this book. Surprisingly, not a single page felt superfluous and I read it in just a few days. With spot-on dialogue and well-developed characters, this book brings the world of Mary and Ann Boleyn to vivid life.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book was so good, I was doubtful after reading "The Other Queen" that I would like it. But this book sucks you in and doesn't let you go until the last page. I loved how the author forced you to understand the importance of family to the Boleyn's/Howard's. And that she really stayed historically accurate while still keeping you guessing as to what would happen next. It's amazing to me that even when you know the outcome you are still dying to read her take on it. I love books that can make history exciting and this one really does the trick.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very well written FICTIONAL story of the sister of Anne Boleyn. Mary is very likable and you wind up admiring her and feeling sorry for her at the same time.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Great Read! One of my most favorite books written by Philippa Gregory. I watched the movie also, but didn't like it as well as the book. I would recommend this book to others.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Essentially a romance novel. Diverting historical fiction, good for a "beach read". Literature it's not. At 660 pp., is twice as long as it should be.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I just recently joined a book club and this was the first book that was chosen to read. While I enjoyed the book and learned a lot of interesting historical aspects of the Boleyn's and how women were treated in general, I found that the book was way to long. I feel that it could have been told in a shorter more condensed version, and still had the same impact. It got me out of my typicla genre, and made me appreciate historical fiction.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A good story. The interesting thing, to me, is that Mary (the narrator) has little memorable personality at all, other than being sweet and un-scheming. Perhaps her character development is more evident in the unabridged version?Since I don't know much about the actual historical record involving Anne, Mary or Henry (or Anne and Mary's father and uncle), I am curious to hear the basis for the grand political intrigue the Boleyn's brewed up in this book. I fully believe that there was pressure to get on the king's good side and receive favors, but were Anne and Mary so easily used as pawns? Were their parents so heartless?read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Excellent book for those of us who love historical fiction.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A wonderful historical fiction! The characters really drew me in. Although, I love to read about Henry VIII and his wives so it didn't take much to draw me in. This book is full of plotting and deception. I couldn't put it down.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

I know it's a novel, but honestly, I know top much of the history to enjoy it. I mean, Gregory treats Anne's fostering of Mary's son as an adoption in the modern sense, which wasn't how it worked. Fostering between families and with relatives was common practice in that time.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An amazing read following the life of Mary Boleyn, little sister to the infamous Anne Boleyn, as her and her sister's lives come to intertwine with that of Henry VIII. A must-read
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm a little torn about this book. It was definitely a page-turner and I could fall into it quite easily. I could identify with the narrator, Mary, and follow her thought process every step of the way. I was occasionally surprised at how much I could read in one sitting. But I had some problems with it as well. About halfway through, Mary stops caring about the court and all she wants to do is be at the family home of Hever with her children. This is all fine and well, but all the action that she reports on and that is vital to the plot happens at court. So we get pages and pages and pages of court dealings we're given no reason to care about and, if we're lucky, a few paragraphs of her summers at Hever. I was annoyed that the detail seemed to come into the wrong places at many times. Overall though, if you're looking for historical fiction and don't mind trudging through some things, go for it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Other Boleyn Girl is this month’s book club selection. This is a work of historical fiction told from the perspective of Mary Boleyn, the little known sister of Anne Boleyn. Anne married Henry VIII and became Queen of England. She was ultimately charged with adultery and witchcraft and executed at the Tower of London. On the face of it, this book should’ve been right up my alley as it is one of my favorite genres. The novel started well but I felt that it quickly deteriorated from a work of historical fiction to pure romance novel. Having read a fair number of romance novels during my teenage years, I saw many similarities. Devastating beautiful but headstrong heroine. Man persues her. She plays hard to get. There is a chase. Man eventually gets the girl. Etc. etc. I’ve read that Gregory took great liberties with the facts despite citing numerous historical works as reference. I find this odd because although other authors of historical fiction frequently do the same…I don’t recall them citing as many references. In citing references, I think you are leading the reader to believe that you are sticking to many of the facts. Anyhow, since I’m not a Tudor era historian of anything, I don’t really care what Gregory has made up to make the story more interesting. I just care that I didn’t really enjoy this book as much as I thought I would. It was interesting (or depressing) to see how little freedom women had back in the day and were nothing to their families but pawns in the marriage game. Life at court must have been so exhausting with your every move being scrutinized and gossiped about. This you definitely don’t see in a traditional romance novel so this is where Gregory’s book does differ and is a step above. She has also piqued my interest in the Tudor family and I’d be interested to know more about the reign of Elizabeth I, the daughter of Anne and Henry. How does Elizabeth ascend the throne after her mother is beheaded? Your favor in court can really change as quickly as the weather.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book left me breathless. I zoomed through the last 150 to 200 pages or so in one sitting, unable to put it down and racing for the conclusion. I don't know why I don't read historical fiction more often. I love history and I love fiction. Plus, historical fiction gives you an insider's view into the lives of past figures in a way you would never see them. Don't get me wrong, I know that most of this stuff is made up, but it is somewhat based on fact (sometimes more than others). Reading history books in school or any sort of non-fiction book on history always leaves me wanting more. The people I read or hear about are nothing more than names printed next to dates. I can know when they lived and what they did and what their general occupations were, but I still don't get a good look at who they really were. That's why I love stories. Especially stories like this. The era of Henry VIII (he was big enough to be considered an era, right?) is insanely fascinating, but anything I read in a non-fiction or history book is going to make me bored. Don't just tell me the facts. Immerse me in the culture and fashion and scandals and views and opinions of the time. This book does all of that and then some. I couldn't believe the intensity of this novel, how real the characters became, how I could understand what they were going through, and then how I could better understand the time period because of it. I may not know all the facts concerning Mary and Anne Boleyn and their family, but I do understand how they might have acted this way in a time when religion came under a king's reign instead of the pope's and it truly was a man's world. And, to give it even more praise, this book made me actually want to pick up a history book and learn more about these women and this time.I had heard that the movie was set to be released Dec. 21 from this site where I found the picture, but IMDb.com says it's not set to release until Feb. 29, 2008. Since I haven't seen any trailers or heard anything about it in the media, I'm going to believe IMDb, which is unfortunate because I am a very impatient person. (Personal note: I think Natalie Portman would make a great Anne Boleyn, and I am highly anticipating her role.)I will definitely be reading more of Gregory's work, and I have a feeling that I may have to reread some parts in order to see how some of the characters overlap (I think next up will be The Boleyn Inheritance). Has anyone else read this book or any others of Gregory's? What are your thoughts/opinions? And, for my own personal knowledge, are her books in some sort of order, or does it not matter which ones you read first?5 out of 5 stars.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I didn't expect to like this book as much as I did. The book is a wonderful fluff book -- history, intrigue, royal politics, and romance. While the book is, in most respects, a soap opera set in Tudor England, it was completely engrossing to read. I'll definitely look out for the other books from this series for the next time I have a long plane or train ride. I'd recommend this to almost anyone.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I LOVED this book. As is so often the case, this book was so much better than the movie. The novel flows well and has great character development. It is narrated by Mary and Gregory masterfully and seamlessly matures her narration with the story. I became so interested and attached to the characters that I didn't want to put the book down, and was sad when it was finished.Gregory's type and style of story reminds me slightly of Ken Folett, whom I also enjoy.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book was just wonderful - it painted such a vivid picture of life in England during the days of Anne Boleyn and it was impossible to put this book down.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Other Boleyn Girl is a largely fictional narrative retelling of Anne and Mary Boleyn and Henry VIII. Even though the book employed a lot of hypothesising, conjecture and artistic license, I learnt a lot about the period because it interested me enough that I followed up with a bit of further research (I previously knew very little). So I found it both entertaining and educational. The writing was entirely adequate, though not excellent.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A cut above the average historical saga, this deals with the notorious Anne Boleyn and how her ambitious family set schemes in place to see a Boleyn on the throne besides Henry the VIII. My first Philippa Gregory and not the last; immensely readable, the historical details feel accurate and the prose just washes over you gripping you in the plot as the best books should. Told from Mary, Anne's sister's perspective, who becomes Henry's mistress while he is married to Katherine of Aragorn, this doesn't make the best portrayal of Anne Boleyn's character but is an absolute page turner. Even if you're not a fan of historical fiction this provides enough twists and intrigue to entertain and reads like a Tudor soap opera but in a good way.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Passionate, clever and perfectly detailed. I love everything about this book. Philippa Gregory never disappoints me no matter in what period of time or genre.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This started out as a typical historical-fiction romp, but towards the end Gregory's fine writting produces a heart-wrenching and suspenseful climax -- even when you know how the story ends. Good characterization for most of the major characters and skillful weaving of the plot lines make the story flow. I do agree that it could have been edited down a bit...too much repetition....and of course some of the historical details are a bit blurry....but Gregory is clever to have this story of Anne Boleyn's rise and fall be narrated by a lesser known historical personage so she has a litte more play with details. Enjoyable.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Loved it. Was the first book I read in the Tudor series and now have read all of them. I knew about Anne but loved learning about Mary and Catherine Carey.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I would give the first half of this book 2, maybe 3 stars and the 2nd half, four stars so if you're struggling with caring about what happens to any of these characters, stick with it. I finally started to care about Mary after she fell in love with William and wanted to make a life for herself. Some parts of the book I relished in, while some parts I just had to forget about as soon as I read it.
To the argument that the author took many liberties with the story and distorted some facts, it is historical FICTION!! I don't think I would use it to teach a history lesson.
All in all, it was an entertaining read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
1500's Period Piece. Very well done.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I was intrigued by the idea of reading a book about Mary Boleyn. Unfortunately, this is a book mostly about Anne Boleyn, as narrated by Mary - the book ends with Anne and George Boleyn's beheading, although Mary survived them by a number of years. I was really disappointed by this; I would actually have been more interested in reading about her later life, which is rarely covered in history books. Ah well, I see that Karen Harper's Passion's Reign, recently reissued as The Last Boleyn has gotten good reviews; I'll give that a shot. It's not very good history - I give it three stars only because it was it was readable and held my interest at the beach. When I got home, I rushed to my books on the Tudors; no, I was not remembering wrong, this is filled with errors, as other reviewers have pointed out. I will point out another: I know of no evidence that Anne wanted to adopt her nephew, nor do I think it would have made her more valuable to Henry. Outside of the fact that it is not clear that the boy was Henry's son, he already had an acknowledged illegitimate son, Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond. Henry seems to have doubted that he could successfully leave the throne to Richmond, so I cannot see how the belated acknowledgement of another illegitimate son would help. Her nephew was Anne's ward, but widows were not usually the guardians of their minor children at this point, indeed they were often given into the "care" of avaricious strangers, so it seems as likely that Anne was being protective as predatory. I leave it to the reader to decide whether historical inaccuracies bother them or not, but I think they should be aware of them. Gregory occasionally picks up on some interesting angles: Mary is somewhat ambivalent about Katharine of Aragon. On the one hand, her family is trying to bring about the Queen's downfall, on the other, she admires Katharine and feels guilty about her participation. I also liked the scenes of Mary with her grandmother when she is in exile from the court. I am something of an Anne Boleyn fan, but I understand why people don't like her. What I can't understand is that none of the anti-Anne writers seem to be able to imagine her as a three dimensional person - I thought that writers always had trouble making the virtuous as interesting as the villainous. Anne should at least be a clever and alluring (but not beautiful) seductress a la Milady DeWinter in the Three Musqueteers. In this book, as in Suzanne Dann's Queen of Subtleties and numerous others, Anne is once again a caricature of a shrill, coarse harpy - how could Henry have stood a single hour with such a person? The story is a bit crude and torrid for my tastes - the sex scenes were too many and too detailed and sometimes downright implausible. The relationship between the sisters never makes much sense - it's not so much complex as inconsistent. Overlooking the historical errors, it's not a particularly good novel, but certainly not the worst that I've read. It certainly didn't inspire me to read more of Philippa Gregory. I finally picked up her novel about Katharine of Aragon, but I didn't think that it was even as good as this. For Philippa Gregory fans and people (and we are legion) who read just about anything set during this era.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Although it is fairly trashy, the fact that it is based on a historical story and setting gives the book a lot of intrigue. The history of Henry VIII is fascinating and Philippa Greogory tells an interesting story. I really wonder if the theory/reason that it is suggested in the book and one other historian as to why Anne Boleyn is beheaded is true.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A good read. Ann Boleyn's story told from Mary Boleyn's perspective.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Phillipa Gregory has so many admirers I decided I had to give her a second chance. I'm glad I did.The Other Boleyn Girl is an artistically woven tapestry of historical fiction and fact surrounding Henry VIII's dismissal of his first and longest standing wife, Katherine of Aragon, and the rise and fall of Anne Boleyn, his second wife, told through the eyes of Mary, Anne's younger sister and mother to two of the king's children.There are characters you'll love (like Queen Katherine and Mary Boleyn) and characters you'll love to hate (Anne and her Uncle). Even the peripheral characters, like Grandma Howard, are fleshed out with interesting quirks and personal descriptions.Palace intrigue abounds. There are multiple mistresses vying for the crown jewels, the jockeying for position of the Seymore and Howard/Boleyn families, the carousing of young men of court caught up in gambling, whoring, buggery, wine, and song, the begetting of several illegitimate heirs, the loss of innocence, the discovery of love, and, of course, beheadings. All of this followed by a happy ending--at least for our heroine, Mary!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I was truly intrigued by the concept of sisters Mary and Anne Boleyn, in turn, being viewed as "The Other Boleyn Girl" by both family and court, and how that affected their motivation and fueled rivalries. I also bought the premise behind brother George's various contributions to the story. However, I was less sold on Mary's portrayal, firstly, as the younger sister; and, secondly, as lacking in courtly sophistication. Various other inconsistencies with mainstream historical sources were also distracting. Judging from this novel, "The Queen's Fool" and "The Constant Princess," it's evident that Ms. Gregory keeps her 'artistic license' within easy reach, and that tends to lessen my enjoyment of her stories. Still, "The Other Boleyn Girl" is a gripping read, and IMHO the best of Ms. Gregory's Tudor-era-based fiction.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Tudor royalty has always held a fascination for me. This is a familiar story - told from an unusual point of view. I knew (from Victoria Holt's novel of Katherine) that Henry had Anne's sister Mary for a mistress, but having Mary tell the story is very interesting. The ruthlessness of the Boleyn family (with the Howards) was brilliantly portrayed through Mary's eyes.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Facing more than 500 pages in a genre I don't typically enjoy, I questioned whether I'd be able to finish this book. Surprisingly, not a single page felt superfluous and I read it in just a few days. With spot-on dialogue and well-developed characters, this book brings the world of Mary and Ann Boleyn to vivid life.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book was so good, I was doubtful after reading "The Other Queen" that I would like it. But this book sucks you in and doesn't let you go until the last page. I loved how the author forced you to understand the importance of family to the Boleyn's/Howard's. And that she really stayed historically accurate while still keeping you guessing as to what would happen next. It's amazing to me that even when you know the outcome you are still dying to read her take on it. I love books that can make history exciting and this one really does the trick.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very well written FICTIONAL story of the sister of Anne Boleyn. Mary is very likable and you wind up admiring her and feeling sorry for her at the same time.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Great Read! One of my most favorite books written by Philippa Gregory. I watched the movie also, but didn't like it as well as the book. I would recommend this book to others.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Essentially a romance novel. Diverting historical fiction, good for a "beach read". Literature it's not. At 660 pp., is twice as long as it should be.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I just recently joined a book club and this was the first book that was chosen to read. While I enjoyed the book and learned a lot of interesting historical aspects of the Boleyn's and how women were treated in general, I found that the book was way to long. I feel that it could have been told in a shorter more condensed version, and still had the same impact. It got me out of my typicla genre, and made me appreciate historical fiction.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A good story. The interesting thing, to me, is that Mary (the narrator) has little memorable personality at all, other than being sweet and un-scheming. Perhaps her character development is more evident in the unabridged version?Since I don't know much about the actual historical record involving Anne, Mary or Henry (or Anne and Mary's father and uncle), I am curious to hear the basis for the grand political intrigue the Boleyn's brewed up in this book. I fully believe that there was pressure to get on the king's good side and receive favors, but were Anne and Mary so easily used as pawns? Were their parents so heartless?
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Excellent book for those of us who love historical fiction.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A wonderful historical fiction! The characters really drew me in. Although, I love to read about Henry VIII and his wives so it didn't take much to draw me in. This book is full of plotting and deception. I couldn't put it down.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Load more
scribd