• book

From the Publisher

Since the 1970s, the striking increase in immigration to the United States has been accompanied by a marked change in the composition of the immigrant community, with a much higher percentage of foreign-born workers coming from Latin America and Asia and a dramatically lower percentage from Europe.

This timely study is unique in presenting new data sets on the labor force, wage rates, and demographic conditions of both the U.S. and source-area economies through the 1980s. The contributors analyze the economic effects of immigration on the United States and selected source areas, with a focus on Puerto Rico and El Salvador. They examine the education and job performance of foreign-born workers; assimilation, fertility, and wage rates; and the impact of remittances by immigrants to family members on the overall gross domestic product of source areas.

A revealing and original examination of a topic of growing importance, this book will stand as a guide for further research on immigration and on the economies of developing countries.
Published: University of Chicago Press an imprint of UChicagoPress on
ISBN: 9780226066707
List price: $87.00
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Immigration and the Work Force by George J. Borjas
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Fortune
1 min read

Canada’s Brain Gain Strategy

NO ISSUE has driven the politics of the 2016 election like immigration. Donald Trump has capitalized on economic and racial anxieties by promising to build a wall on the Mexican border. Liberals, meanwhile, have driven up Google searches for “move to Canada,” worrying Trump will win. A better solution for disillusioned voters isn’t decamping for Canada, though, but emulating it—particularly when it comes to immigration. According to a 2016 survey by the Public Religion Research Institute and the Brookings Institution, 61% of white working-class voters believe immigrants weaken the U.S. by ta
Foreign Policy
5 min read
Politics

A Blow To The Soul

Donald Trump has a heart full of fear. The world terrifies him. It’s not just the terror threat he overstates or his overt dread of facts, science, or democratic processes. No, Trump also apparently fears schoolchildren in sunny American suburbs—immigrants and refugees often left with nothing but the scars of war. We know this because he has prioritized turning the might of the most powerful government in the world against these innocents. Rather than addressing the threats posed by an ill-intentioned Russian government or following up on his tough talk about a rising China, the new president
The Atlantic
4 min read

How Immigrants Have Contributed to American Inventiveness

Immigrants have helped generate some of America’s most beloved inventions. Alexander Graham Bell, born in Scotland, helped develop the telephone. David Lindquist, a Swede, was the chief engineer at Otis, and pioneered the electric elevator. Herman Frasch, born in Germany, worked in America on a process that would become fracking. Countries don’t only welcome immigrants because they are good inventors; the best argument for allowing people to migrate from places of conflict or economic malaise might be basic human decency—which is one reason there is so much uproar over President Trump’s execut