Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
The Pulitzer Prize–winning, bestselling biography of America’s founding father and second president that was the basis for the acclaimed HBO series, brilliantly told by master historian David McCullough.

In this powerful, epic biography, David McCullough unfolds the adventurous life journey of John Adams, the brilliant, fiercely independent, often irascible, always honest Yankee patriot who spared nothing in his zeal for the American Revolution; who rose to become the second president of the United States and saved the country from blundering into an unnecessary war; who was learned beyond all but a few and regarded by some as “out of his senses”; and whose marriage to the wise and valiant Abigail Adams is one of the moving love stories in American history.

This is history on a grand scale—a book about politics and war and social issues, but also about human nature, love, religious faith, virtue, ambition, friendship, and betrayal, and the far-reaching consequences of noble ideas. Above all, John Adams is an enthralling, often surprising story of one of the most important and fascinating Americans who ever lived.

Topics: United States of America, Philadelphia, Paris, Informative, American History, American Revolution, Politics, Founding Fathers, American Government, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Leadership, Democracy, and American Foreign Policy

Published: Simon & Schuster on
ISBN: 9780743218290
List price: $12.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for John Adams
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Simply an incredible and noteworthy account of one of our greatest statesmen. I felt as if I had said goodbye to a life long friend by the end of the book. It is a book that I will recommend and return to.more
John Adams was in some ways the most easily-known of the first three presidents. He lacked Washington's stoic demeanor. He recorded his own thoughts and impressions of events, unlike Jefferson. It's refreshing to look back on him after so many years of carefully-managed political lives (until the messiness comes spilling out on its own, of course). The problem for Adams' legacy is that Adams comes across as very human, and his faults are there on display for anyone. It's easy to malign him when you can use his own careless words against him.He had faults - he was often accused of vanity, and he could be quick with a sharp word. He was often unsparing in the opinions he voiced in letters. He had famous fallings-out with Franklin and Jefferson. In particular, his break with Jefferson was public and acrimonious. Jefferson wrote in a letter about Adams as a diplomat in the French court, "he hates Franklin, he hates Jay, he hates the French, he hates the English - to whom will he adhere?" Later, accepting Jefferson's resignation as Secretary of State, Adams said, "a good riddance to bad ware." However, in their later years Jefferson and Adams resumed a friendship, even if that was mostly achieved by Jefferson's resolute silence about the things that had caused and would cause acrimony between them.Adams in a nutshell -The good: Adams had a unique relationship with Abigail. He talked to her about political matters, and respected her opinions. Evidence exists that he followed her advice and preferences more than once. He was stubborn when he believed in something, and would stand for it no matter the consequences; defending the British soldiers in the Boston Massacre trial was an early but not isolated example of this tendency.The bad: He did have a high opinion of himself; so much so that when he was coming back from Europe after his diplomatic duties there, he was only willing to accept the vice-presidency in Washington's administration, believing that all other offices were below him. (These inferior offices included senator, governor, and Chief Justice.) He had a hard time shutting up when he felt he was being maligned or unfairly portrayed - he wrote a 3-year-long series of weekly columns defending himself against accusations made in a pamphlet by Alexander Hamilton. That Hamilton had been dead for years slowed him down not at all.McCullough's book captures Adams in all his contradictory vividness. At times I wondered why we seemed to spend so much time on Jefferson, but their lives really were deeply entwined, even down to their July 4 deaths, hours apart from each other. He had a full life (he lived to age 90), he saw more of the world than most of his contemporaries, living in France, the Netherlands, and England, and he enjoyed his life to the utmost.more
I gave a copy of this book to my father. If you enjoy reading about American historical figures, I bet you'll enjoy this.more
Read all 85 reviews

Reviews

Simply an incredible and noteworthy account of one of our greatest statesmen. I felt as if I had said goodbye to a life long friend by the end of the book. It is a book that I will recommend and return to.more
John Adams was in some ways the most easily-known of the first three presidents. He lacked Washington's stoic demeanor. He recorded his own thoughts and impressions of events, unlike Jefferson. It's refreshing to look back on him after so many years of carefully-managed political lives (until the messiness comes spilling out on its own, of course). The problem for Adams' legacy is that Adams comes across as very human, and his faults are there on display for anyone. It's easy to malign him when you can use his own careless words against him.He had faults - he was often accused of vanity, and he could be quick with a sharp word. He was often unsparing in the opinions he voiced in letters. He had famous fallings-out with Franklin and Jefferson. In particular, his break with Jefferson was public and acrimonious. Jefferson wrote in a letter about Adams as a diplomat in the French court, "he hates Franklin, he hates Jay, he hates the French, he hates the English - to whom will he adhere?" Later, accepting Jefferson's resignation as Secretary of State, Adams said, "a good riddance to bad ware." However, in their later years Jefferson and Adams resumed a friendship, even if that was mostly achieved by Jefferson's resolute silence about the things that had caused and would cause acrimony between them.Adams in a nutshell -The good: Adams had a unique relationship with Abigail. He talked to her about political matters, and respected her opinions. Evidence exists that he followed her advice and preferences more than once. He was stubborn when he believed in something, and would stand for it no matter the consequences; defending the British soldiers in the Boston Massacre trial was an early but not isolated example of this tendency.The bad: He did have a high opinion of himself; so much so that when he was coming back from Europe after his diplomatic duties there, he was only willing to accept the vice-presidency in Washington's administration, believing that all other offices were below him. (These inferior offices included senator, governor, and Chief Justice.) He had a hard time shutting up when he felt he was being maligned or unfairly portrayed - he wrote a 3-year-long series of weekly columns defending himself against accusations made in a pamphlet by Alexander Hamilton. That Hamilton had been dead for years slowed him down not at all.McCullough's book captures Adams in all his contradictory vividness. At times I wondered why we seemed to spend so much time on Jefferson, but their lives really were deeply entwined, even down to their July 4 deaths, hours apart from each other. He had a full life (he lived to age 90), he saw more of the world than most of his contemporaries, living in France, the Netherlands, and England, and he enjoyed his life to the utmost.more
I gave a copy of this book to my father. If you enjoy reading about American historical figures, I bet you'll enjoy this.more
Thoroughly enjoyable. I kind of want to pick up a paper copy to review a few bits (a little difficult to do with the audio version in the car).more
I enjoyed the HBO film based on this book, although I got a little fed up with the strange way Giamatti delivered his lines after a while. The rest of the cast was marvelous, David Morse as Washington and Tom Wilkinson as Franklin in particular. I'm fascinated with this period -- so I expect I'll like the book even more than the miniseries.

Finished at last. I enjoyed this book greatly. It left me wondering why there is no Adams Memorial in our nation's capital.more
Load more
scribd