This title is not available in your country

We’re working with the publisher to make it available as soon as possible.

Request Title
Jodi Picoult has touched readers deeply with her acclaimed novels, such as Keeping Faith and The Pact. Gifted with "a remarkable ability to make us share her characters' feelings" (People), Picoult now explores the complex choices of the heart for a young Amish woman -- the compelling journey of discovery for an urban lawyer who befriends and protects her.
The small town of Paradise, Pennsylvania, is a jewel in Lancaster County -- known for its picture-postcard landscapes and bucolic lifestyle. But that peace is shattered by the discovery of a dead infant in the barn of an Amish farmer. A police investigation quickly leads to two startling disclosures: the newborn's mother is an unmarried Amish woman, eighteen-year-old Katie Fisher. And the infant did not die of natural causes. Although Katie denies the medical proof that she gave birth to the child, circumstantial evidence leads to her arrest for the murder of her baby.
One hundred miles away, Philadelphia defense attorney Ellie Hathaway has achieved an enviable, high-profile career. But her latest court "victory" has set the sands shifting beneath her. Single at thirty-nine and unsatisfied with her relationship, Ellie doesn't look back when she turns down her chance to make partner and takes off for an open-ended stay at her great-aunt's home in Paradise.
Fate brings her to Katie Fisher. Suddenly, Ellie sees the chance to defend a client who truly needs her, not just one who can afford her. But taking on this case challenges Ellie in more ways than one. She finds herself not only in a clash of wills with a client who does not want to be defended but also in a clash of cultures with a people whose channels of justice are markedly different from her own.
Immersing herself in Katie Fisher's life -- and in a world founded on faith, humility, duty, and honesty -- Ellie begins to understand the pressures and sacrifices of those who to live "plain." As she peels away the layers of fact and fantasy, Ellie calls on an old friend for guidance. Now, just as this man from Ellie's past reenters her life, she must uncover the truth about a complex case, a tragic loss, the bonds of love -- and her own deepest fears and desires.
Moving seamlessly from psychological drama to courtroom suspense, Plain Truth is a triumph of contemporary storytelling. Jodi Picoult presents a fascinating portrait of Amish life rarely witnessed by those outside the faith -- and discovers a place where circumstances are not always what they seem, where love meets falsehood, and where relationships grow strong enough to span two worlds.

Topics: Murder, Mothers, Teen Pregnancy, Pennsylvania, First Person Narration, Family, Suspenseful, Crime, Psychological, Dramatic, Babies, and Third Person Narration

Published: Atria Books on
ISBN: 9780743422819
List price: $13.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Plain Truth: A Novel
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
I've only read one other Picoult book to date (Vanishing Acts), but I really enjoyed Plain Truth. I felt that Picoult did a great job illustrating the devastating effects one decision can make on a family, self-morality and self-discovery.
Plain Truth was a page turner for me and one I might read again.more
Excelente! Aborda o comportamento dos Amish de forma envolvente ao mesmo tempo em que narra um thriller com maestria!more
On Thursday, August 09, 2007 I wrote:


I finished reading this book last night and I agree with my mate Cindy, I consider this the best book of the 4 I've read by this author.
I've read my Sister's Keeper,Salem Falls, Vanishing Act but this is the best one.

I am intrigued by the life of The Amish. That was really interesting, to see the changes of our life and the Plain people (I don't consider them plain at all ;)

Loved the characters and the way the story was woven.

Now I know I want to try another Jodi Picoult book.

more
Before I read this, I knew next to nothing about the Amish, or Plain way of life. This reaches through and draws you in. I would really be curious to read something more factual if anyone has any recommendations? This was a fast easy read...more
Read all 83 reviews

Reviews

I've only read one other Picoult book to date (Vanishing Acts), but I really enjoyed Plain Truth. I felt that Picoult did a great job illustrating the devastating effects one decision can make on a family, self-morality and self-discovery.
Plain Truth was a page turner for me and one I might read again.more
Excelente! Aborda o comportamento dos Amish de forma envolvente ao mesmo tempo em que narra um thriller com maestria!more
On Thursday, August 09, 2007 I wrote:


I finished reading this book last night and I agree with my mate Cindy, I consider this the best book of the 4 I've read by this author.
I've read my Sister's Keeper,Salem Falls, Vanishing Act but this is the best one.

I am intrigued by the life of The Amish. That was really interesting, to see the changes of our life and the Plain people (I don't consider them plain at all ;)

Loved the characters and the way the story was woven.

Now I know I want to try another Jodi Picoult book.

more
Before I read this, I knew next to nothing about the Amish, or Plain way of life. This reaches through and draws you in. I would really be curious to read something more factual if anyone has any recommendations? This was a fast easy read...more
This is a story about 39 year-old lawyer, Ellie Hathaway, a young Amish girl, Katie Fisher, accused of murdering her newborn baby, and the Amish community.

When a newborn baby is found dead and hidden in a barn on an Amish dairy farm, all signs point to young, unmarried, Katie Fisher. A police and medical investigation firmly prove that Katie was in fact pregnant and recently gave birth: a fact she adamantly denies.

Meanwhile, Ellie, who has just finished up a stressful case, is seeking rest and relaxation with her former Amish aunt (who also happens to be Katie's aunt!) By what eventually will seem like fate, Ellie has herself a new case to work on. This also means Ellie has to become apart of Katie's world. This creates a challenge for every person involved.

Writing: The writing, like Picoult's always is, was great. Everything flowed smoothly and was full of detail. She did a wonderful job writing about the Amish community and did it in a way that the reader should have no problem imagining themselves right there on a farm.

Plot: The plot wasn't entirely unique... it made Amy Efaw's After come to mind often, but the fact that it dealt with an Amish girl put an interesting spin on it. The first part is very psychologically and emotionally based; the hows and whys and theories. If psychology is your thing, this book is for you. The second half is more courtroom orientated, but not overdone.

Characters: Katie, even though she is accused of such a horrendous crime, is still written in a way that you can't help but still like her and hope she didn't do it. I understood her and sympathized with her the entire time. Ellie, however, there were times I did like her and times I didn't. It honestly didn't take away from enjoying the overall story.more
Imagine: You are a lawyer and you are in need of a much-needed break, so you stay with you aunt in a quiet Amish village for a little bit. It’s the first morning there and a murder of a newborn baby has just occurred not too far from your house. The suspect is an Amish teenage girl. They ask you to represent her, you accept it. It’s now time for you to hop on the roller coaster that is this case. In the fictitious novel, Plain Truth by Jodi Picoult, Amish ways of life are tested, and the search for the truth is hunted with determination and faith. Plain Truth takes place in East Paradise Township, Lancaster County, PA, in the present time. Ellie finds out that the first she’s there, a newborn baby was murdered and her aunt asks her to represent her other niece, Katie Fisher who is accused of killing her own newborn baby boy. During most of the book, Katie denies being pregnant and having a premature baby. Ellie has represented drug lords pleading that they’re innocent before, but yet, she feels that this is one of the most difficult cases she’s ever had to take on. Anyway, throughout the book Katie talks about her sister, Hannah, and Hannah’s death. Hannah drowned one time when she was ice-skating, and Katie has always felt guilty because she was with her when it all happened. Katie also talks about her brother, Jacob, who was excommunicated because he wanted to go to college and since he’s Amish, school stop after eighth grade. Ellie asks Katie throughout the book to try to remember the night that Katie went into labor. Katie can only remember certain parts because she was in a dissociative psychological state after she gave birth to her baby. However we learn that this is false. Towards the middle of the book we learn that Katie had been sneaking off to see her brother up at Penn State, which is allowed by her mother. While she is there we learn that she gets to experience being “English” and during one visit, Katie gets pregnant with her brother’s roommate, Adam. Katie’s journey to admitting this is a long and hard one. We also learn throughout the book that Ellie has experienced heartbreak before, so when and old beau is asked to evaluate Katie because Coop (that is his name) is a psychologist, Ellie is more than happy to see him. Now you’d think that she never wanted to see him again, but that is not the case. Coop plays a very important role in this book because he’s the one allowing Katie to remember bits and pieces from the night she gave birth. In this book, all of Katie’s close friends believe she is innocent because how can a sweet Amish girl who loves children and wants to have them when she is married, kill her own child? How can a mother kill her own child? Is there some medical explanation that can prove the baby died in the sleeping mothers arms, of natural causes like a disease? In some ways, Plain Truth is like Scott Turow's legal thriller novel Presumed Innocent . Both books are about the struggle to believing the accused ones are actually innocent. In both novels, the characters cannot remember what had happened to their loved ones just a few hours before the crime. Both novels, there are strong relationships with their dead loved ones. And in both cases, the settings take place in quiet rural areas. Plain Truth, Jodi Picoult’s seventh novel, is a crime novel discussing what is the right way to deal with your problems, and what how you are portrayed and accepted in your community. This book is somewhat original, but is a real page-turner. The novel really hooks the reader to keep the reader, well, reading more! The book is just simply too interesting to put down. This book would be for a teenager to an adult. Yeah, it’s that good.more
Load more
scribd