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From the Publisher


The groundbreaking, "seminal work" (Time) on intelligent design that dares to ask, was Darwin wrong?


In 1996, Darwin's Black Box helped to launch the intelligent design movement: the argument that nature exhibits evidence of design, beyond Darwinian randomness. It sparked a national debate on evolution, which continues to intensify across the country. From one end of the spectrum to the other, Darwin's Black Box has established itself as the key intelligent design text -- the one argument that must be addressed in order to determine whether Darwinian evolution is sufficient to explain life as we know it.

In a major new Afterword for this edition, Behe explains that the complexity discovered by microbiologists has dramatically increased since the book was first published. That complexity is a continuing challenge to Darwinism, and evolutionists have had no success at explaining it. Darwin's Black Box is more important today than ever.

Topics: Evolution, Creationism, Christianity, Genetics, Design, and Essays

Published: Free Press on
ISBN: 9780743214858
List price: $6.99
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