Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

Editor’s Note

“Wildly Popular...”

Weiner’s wildly popular debut is an empowering, electric story of finding inner peace in an often chaotic, superficial world.
Scribd Editor
At first my eyes wouldn't make sense of the letters. Finally, they unscrambled. Loving a Larger Woman, said the headline, by Bruce Guberman. Bruce Guberman had been my boyfriend for just over three years, until we'd decided to take a break three months ago. And the larger woman, I could only assume, was me.

Cannie Shapiro never wanted to be famous. The smart, sharp, plus-sized pop culture reporter was perfectly content writing about other people's lives on the pages of the Philadelphia Examiner. But the day she opens up a national women's magazine to find out that her ex-boyfriend has been chronicling their ex-sex life is the day her life changes forever.
Loving a larger woman is an act of courage in our world, Bruce has written. And Cannie -- who never knew that Bruce saw her as a "larger woman," or thought that loving her was an act of courage -- is plunged into misery, and into the most amazing year of her life.
For the previous twenty-eight years, things had been tripping along nicely for Cannie. Sure, her mother's come charging out of the closet, and her father's long since dropped out of her world. But she loves her job, her friends, her tiny rat terrier, Nifkin, and her life in Philadelphia. She loves her apartment, and her commodious, quilt-lined bed. She has made a tenuous peace with her non-size 6 body. And she'd even felt okay about ending her relationship with Bruce. But now this.
After finding herself publicly humiliated, with the most intimate details of her life in print, Cannie embarks on a series of hilarious and heartbreaking adventures. From showdowns with her snooping office nemesis to run-ins with her mother's less-than-lovable life partner, from trips to the glamour spots of New York City and Los Angeles to a disastrous reconciliation with the man who took her heart and tossed it onto the New Jersey Turnpike, Cannie navigates an odyssey she never planned on taking. She mourns her losses, faces the past, and figures out who she really is, and who she can become.
Radiant with wit, bursting with surprises, and written with bite and bittersweet humor, Jennifer Weiner's deliciously readable debut novel reaches beyond Cannie's story and into the heart of every woman. It features an unbelievably funny cast of supporting characters, the strangest dog you'll ever encounter, and, best of all, Cannie Shapiro -- a heroine you'll never forget.

Topics: Duology, Series, First in a Series, Debut, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, First Person Narration, Body Image, Sex, Writing, Breakups, Weight Loss, Dogs, Female Protagonist, Writers, Pregnancy, Screenwriting, Sisters, Funny, and Poignant

Published: Atria Books on
ISBN: 9780743418188
List price: $7.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Good in Bed
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
No need to use the obviously sexist, absurd, shoot-yourselves-in-the-foot term "chicklit" (unless you use "dicklit" just as often) so ENOUGH, ladies! Moving on, the main character goes through some tough times but ***SPOILER*** there is a happy ending, which suits me fine. ***END SPOILER*** Some of the characters were a bit two-dimensional but overall, it was a good read and the main character was very likeable and interesting, despite the fluff elements.more
A great and easy read! There were times I stayed up way past my bedtime because I couldn't put it down. It ended kind of abrubtly, but all in all worth a read.more
Heart-winning story
I love how jennie make the up and down feeling inside more
Where have you been all my life!more
Wasn't able to finish the first chapter. Hope her other novels aren't as shallow. more
I stopped reading this book the second the author made an anti-gay joke in the first chapter. Not cool. more
Moving, sweet, relatable and laugh out loud funny. a wonderful look at size and our culture.
more
smart...witty. more
I really wanted to like this book and even more so, Cannie. I just could not find it in myself to sympathize with her 1st world problems, her belittling herself, and her overall obliviousness. I usually am able to connect to characters, but I couldn't. Don't waste your time reading this very stale book. more
Read this book many years ago and loved it. Perfect for someone in or newly out of college.more
I guess women's fiction just isn't my cup of tea. Everything was sad and depressing. This woman had no control over her life. And (yes, spoiler, sort of) she magically becomes skinny when she faces a tragedy so she stops eating, walks constantly and does various other things to endanger her health. But that's ok...because she's skinny? What a weird overall message. I put the book down feeling just sad and wishing I hadn't read it.more
I can't believe it took me so many years to read this book! Having now read it and loved it I just wish I'd read it at the time I was reading "In Her Shoes". I think now I'd better get cracking on filling in the other gaps I have in my Jennifer Weiner reading experience!

I thought "Good In Bed" was wonderful, I really empathised with Connie and got completely swept away by her story. I laughed, I got angry at other characters and I cried throughout the course of the book. Great stuff!more
on Thursday, July 01, 2004 I wrote about this book:


Wow I,ve just finished reading this book and with regret that is.
I really loved reading this book and did not expect that at all.I thought it would be a "trying very hard to be funny book" It was an emotional book. I have been laughing but also on the verge of tears on the last 2 chapters.



Update February 28-2010.
I finished this book last night and yes I must admit I would not give this book 5 stars now. 4 stars would be better. Really still liked it but I have become more critical because I've read so many good books in the last couple of years. It was still a fun read but also sometimes very unbelievable.Planning to watch the movie some time. Really curious about the sequel.more
This book was well written and easy to read but something was missing and I could not enjoy reading it. I don't know what is it: maybe the constant pointing out how Cannie is a large woman. Or maybe I was not in the mood to join her in her wallowing in self-pity.more
I think one reason why I will be generous in rating this book highly is that I have just read a shitty book of so-called same genre. Again, it is not chick-lit per se, and I don;t know what else to call it. It is much maturer (thanks books of the genre) and the lead character is nothing like airhead Becky Bloomwood. She is Candace Sharpie, a journalist, more mature - a young twenty eight who is trapped in a body she thinks is fat. Her ex writes a sex column for man called 'Good in Bed' - where he shares his memories of her column after column. In between, lot of twists and turns later Cannie learns to live. It is not frivolous (that is, full of love and men :P), and despite its cheeky title it has lot of sadness going on latter part. But that said, what I loved was some of Cannie's memories - one about how she learnt swimming, it seemed a realistic, sweet story where in author did put some real thought into the plot.

Also, I learnt that one should be thankful of shitty books since they help you appreciate some such writing that you had always deemed 'easy'. :)more
quick easy fun read -- funny too!more
I didn't like the main character much -- she seemed rather shallow. However, the book was a good read. It was nice to have a story about a "non-thin" woman.more
This was a fun diversion, quite comical at times and a really fast read.more
OK... so I am reading the reviews of Good in Bed, not really thinking about writing one myself even though I just finished the book and I liked it. I will start with that fact. I liked the book. However, I just have to write something because I keep seeing the words "chick-lit" and "hilarious" and "entertaining". This book may be those things at times but I think a little warning is needed. This is more than a piece of fluffy beach reading. I can't say that it is great literature, but it is well written and the characters are well developed. Cannie is one of the best heroines that I have come across in a long time. The thing is - and the reason for my review - is that it goes to some really depressing places - real places, but depressing. Perhaps I am going through a little of my own "down" time, but this story went places that made me (almost) have to stop reading. I cried. Not "chick-lit" tears but "OMG This is heartbreaking!" tears. So, take this as my warning. Good in Bed is very funny, but it can tear your heart out, too. Some of the plot is the other side of far-fetched but, in the end, it is well worth the journey.more
I've read a lot of chicklit off a recommendation list recently, and of the twenty I read, this stood out for having a heroine not too stupid to live, or too bitchy, and not having a plot that insulted my intelligence, and had one of the few heroines I could relate to. That heroine and first person narrator is Cannie Shapiro, an entertainment reporter who regrets letting go of her slacker boyfriend--who recently got a column "Good in Bed" in a Cosmopolitan-like magazine. And his debut article is all about her: "Loving a Larger Woman." And yes, she does have issues about her size--Size 16 to be exact, which at her height of 5'10 doesn't necessarily strike me as huge. But then as I know that size is that dividing line between "normal" misses department and plus sized woman's department. I've been fat and I've been thin, but I've been fat a lot more often, so I could definitely relate to her issues and recognize her experiences. And I liked that despite all that, life went on for her. Weiner talks about that at the end of the book. That she wanted to write a book that's not about someone like Bridget Jones who only thinks she's overweight, or one who finally finds happiness only after the right diet comes along. I also liked that Cannie is allowed to hate the lesbian lover of her mother. (Because, you know, lots don't particularly care for a parent's new partner, whatever the gender or orientation.) I liked how she loved her hometown of Philadelphia--the book reads like a love letter to the city. I liked her friends. I liked Cannie. I could identify with her problems with her parentals. Even if there was more than a little of wish fulfillment in the plot, I enjoyed this all through and by and large agree with the blurb from The Boston Globe on the cover that called it "funny, fanciful, extremely poignant."more
Being bogged down with work and with school, I have gone from reading six books a month to reading six books a year (other than academic journals and books related to the politics of East Asia). Good in Bed somehow managed to pique my interest, so I downloaded the kindle edition and started reading. I have to admit, for the first 2/3 of the book I found myself easily identifying with the main character Cannie, minus the boyfriend issues (I'm single, ready to mingle, but I don't see any men knocking down my door) and family problems. She was likable, enjoyable, and well written. The last 1/3 of the novel, though, was where things went off the deep end.The book went from plausible to being one unlikely scenario to another, from meeting and becoming BFFs with the number one Hollywood celeb in a bathroom to her screenplay being sold to her ex's new girlfriend being the cause of her baby's premature birth (maybe). Cannie became unlikable and quite frankly annoying, but by the very end I saw the return of the Cannie from the beginning. But by that point she had the man of her dreams, the baby of her dreams, the life of her dreams, the friends of her dreams, etc etc etc of her dreams. For me, it was like losing the Cannie I cared about on page 50 and replacing her with some Cannie that had been turned into a sterilized Hollywood version of herself that had to be rescued by the handsome love interest who is rich and handsome and kind and smart (so on and so on) instead of saving herself like we had hoped.This book is good mindnumbing fun when you are riding the train to work every day, suffering through writing a Masters thesis while trying yourself to write a novel. But is it a great novel? Absolutely not. Just a little fun. But yeah, I might be putting the sequel on my TBR pile right now as we speak...more
This book is definitely chick-lit, but it wasn't all light and fluffy like I thought it would be; instead it got pretty deep towards the end, tackling some serious issues. I wish I could tell you what those issues are, but that would seriously spoil the whole thing for you should you decide to read it.Cannie Shapiro is an overweight journalist struggling to get over her ex-boyfriend. Along the way she joins a weight loss study, meets celebrities (as part of her job), travels to Hollywood to sell a manuscript, still struggles to get over the ex-boyfriend, tries to make sense of her father's abandonment, and then some bigger things happen. Remember the issues I can't tell you about? Well, it's big and serious, and executed excellently.Weiner is a great writer. And I don't just mean in the "good descriptions and character development" way, though she does that well, too. More importantly, Weiner knows how to write a humorous novel while simultaneously tackling a serious woman's issue and have the ending wrap up in a satisfying, not cliché way. In case you haven't guessed, I was very impressed with the way Weiner took a traditional chick-lit topic and used it to tackle a more serious plot. The book is almost ten years old (omg, where did this last decade go!?) so the references are outdated, but it was fun to look back at them. Overall, I'm glad to have finally read this!more
"good in bed" by Jennifer Weiner is a winner. As the cover describes, it is a heart warming Cinderella story set for today's ideals.This book follows Cannie, Shapiro, a twenty-something, magazine reporter who is one of the "large girls" of the world. Following her life with break-ups, unplanned mishaps, a bad father history, and low-self esteem, this book should be a fictionalized self-help book. However, this is a wonderful book. Uplifting, real, and encouraging. Anybody who reads this book will greatly enjoy it!more
Wasn't sure I would like this book when I picked it up but what a surprise! It was laugh-out-loud funny. I really enjoyed it and loved the heroine Cannie.Back Cover Blurb:Cannie Shapiro never wanted to be famous. The smart, sharp, plus-sized reporter was perfectly happy writing about other people's lives for her local newspaper. And for the past twenty-eight years, things have been tripping along nicely for Cannie.Sure, her mother has come charging out of the closet, and her father has long since dropped out of her world. But she loves her job, her friends, her dog and her life. She loves her apartment and her commodious, quilt-lined bed. She has made a tenuous peace with her body and she even felt okay about ending her relationship with her boyfriend Bruce. But now this.....more
Read all 80 reviews

Reviews

No need to use the obviously sexist, absurd, shoot-yourselves-in-the-foot term "chicklit" (unless you use "dicklit" just as often) so ENOUGH, ladies! Moving on, the main character goes through some tough times but ***SPOILER*** there is a happy ending, which suits me fine. ***END SPOILER*** Some of the characters were a bit two-dimensional but overall, it was a good read and the main character was very likeable and interesting, despite the fluff elements.more
A great and easy read! There were times I stayed up way past my bedtime because I couldn't put it down. It ended kind of abrubtly, but all in all worth a read.more
Heart-winning story
I love how jennie make the up and down feeling inside more
Where have you been all my life!more
Wasn't able to finish the first chapter. Hope her other novels aren't as shallow. more
I stopped reading this book the second the author made an anti-gay joke in the first chapter. Not cool. more
Moving, sweet, relatable and laugh out loud funny. a wonderful look at size and our culture.
more
smart...witty. more
I really wanted to like this book and even more so, Cannie. I just could not find it in myself to sympathize with her 1st world problems, her belittling herself, and her overall obliviousness. I usually am able to connect to characters, but I couldn't. Don't waste your time reading this very stale book. more
Read this book many years ago and loved it. Perfect for someone in or newly out of college.more
I guess women's fiction just isn't my cup of tea. Everything was sad and depressing. This woman had no control over her life. And (yes, spoiler, sort of) she magically becomes skinny when she faces a tragedy so she stops eating, walks constantly and does various other things to endanger her health. But that's ok...because she's skinny? What a weird overall message. I put the book down feeling just sad and wishing I hadn't read it.more
I can't believe it took me so many years to read this book! Having now read it and loved it I just wish I'd read it at the time I was reading "In Her Shoes". I think now I'd better get cracking on filling in the other gaps I have in my Jennifer Weiner reading experience!

I thought "Good In Bed" was wonderful, I really empathised with Connie and got completely swept away by her story. I laughed, I got angry at other characters and I cried throughout the course of the book. Great stuff!more
on Thursday, July 01, 2004 I wrote about this book:


Wow I,ve just finished reading this book and with regret that is.
I really loved reading this book and did not expect that at all.I thought it would be a "trying very hard to be funny book" It was an emotional book. I have been laughing but also on the verge of tears on the last 2 chapters.



Update February 28-2010.
I finished this book last night and yes I must admit I would not give this book 5 stars now. 4 stars would be better. Really still liked it but I have become more critical because I've read so many good books in the last couple of years. It was still a fun read but also sometimes very unbelievable.Planning to watch the movie some time. Really curious about the sequel.more
This book was well written and easy to read but something was missing and I could not enjoy reading it. I don't know what is it: maybe the constant pointing out how Cannie is a large woman. Or maybe I was not in the mood to join her in her wallowing in self-pity.more
I think one reason why I will be generous in rating this book highly is that I have just read a shitty book of so-called same genre. Again, it is not chick-lit per se, and I don;t know what else to call it. It is much maturer (thanks books of the genre) and the lead character is nothing like airhead Becky Bloomwood. She is Candace Sharpie, a journalist, more mature - a young twenty eight who is trapped in a body she thinks is fat. Her ex writes a sex column for man called 'Good in Bed' - where he shares his memories of her column after column. In between, lot of twists and turns later Cannie learns to live. It is not frivolous (that is, full of love and men :P), and despite its cheeky title it has lot of sadness going on latter part. But that said, what I loved was some of Cannie's memories - one about how she learnt swimming, it seemed a realistic, sweet story where in author did put some real thought into the plot.

Also, I learnt that one should be thankful of shitty books since they help you appreciate some such writing that you had always deemed 'easy'. :)more
quick easy fun read -- funny too!more
I didn't like the main character much -- she seemed rather shallow. However, the book was a good read. It was nice to have a story about a "non-thin" woman.more
This was a fun diversion, quite comical at times and a really fast read.more
OK... so I am reading the reviews of Good in Bed, not really thinking about writing one myself even though I just finished the book and I liked it. I will start with that fact. I liked the book. However, I just have to write something because I keep seeing the words "chick-lit" and "hilarious" and "entertaining". This book may be those things at times but I think a little warning is needed. This is more than a piece of fluffy beach reading. I can't say that it is great literature, but it is well written and the characters are well developed. Cannie is one of the best heroines that I have come across in a long time. The thing is - and the reason for my review - is that it goes to some really depressing places - real places, but depressing. Perhaps I am going through a little of my own "down" time, but this story went places that made me (almost) have to stop reading. I cried. Not "chick-lit" tears but "OMG This is heartbreaking!" tears. So, take this as my warning. Good in Bed is very funny, but it can tear your heart out, too. Some of the plot is the other side of far-fetched but, in the end, it is well worth the journey.more
I've read a lot of chicklit off a recommendation list recently, and of the twenty I read, this stood out for having a heroine not too stupid to live, or too bitchy, and not having a plot that insulted my intelligence, and had one of the few heroines I could relate to. That heroine and first person narrator is Cannie Shapiro, an entertainment reporter who regrets letting go of her slacker boyfriend--who recently got a column "Good in Bed" in a Cosmopolitan-like magazine. And his debut article is all about her: "Loving a Larger Woman." And yes, she does have issues about her size--Size 16 to be exact, which at her height of 5'10 doesn't necessarily strike me as huge. But then as I know that size is that dividing line between "normal" misses department and plus sized woman's department. I've been fat and I've been thin, but I've been fat a lot more often, so I could definitely relate to her issues and recognize her experiences. And I liked that despite all that, life went on for her. Weiner talks about that at the end of the book. That she wanted to write a book that's not about someone like Bridget Jones who only thinks she's overweight, or one who finally finds happiness only after the right diet comes along. I also liked that Cannie is allowed to hate the lesbian lover of her mother. (Because, you know, lots don't particularly care for a parent's new partner, whatever the gender or orientation.) I liked how she loved her hometown of Philadelphia--the book reads like a love letter to the city. I liked her friends. I liked Cannie. I could identify with her problems with her parentals. Even if there was more than a little of wish fulfillment in the plot, I enjoyed this all through and by and large agree with the blurb from The Boston Globe on the cover that called it "funny, fanciful, extremely poignant."more
Being bogged down with work and with school, I have gone from reading six books a month to reading six books a year (other than academic journals and books related to the politics of East Asia). Good in Bed somehow managed to pique my interest, so I downloaded the kindle edition and started reading. I have to admit, for the first 2/3 of the book I found myself easily identifying with the main character Cannie, minus the boyfriend issues (I'm single, ready to mingle, but I don't see any men knocking down my door) and family problems. She was likable, enjoyable, and well written. The last 1/3 of the novel, though, was where things went off the deep end.The book went from plausible to being one unlikely scenario to another, from meeting and becoming BFFs with the number one Hollywood celeb in a bathroom to her screenplay being sold to her ex's new girlfriend being the cause of her baby's premature birth (maybe). Cannie became unlikable and quite frankly annoying, but by the very end I saw the return of the Cannie from the beginning. But by that point she had the man of her dreams, the baby of her dreams, the life of her dreams, the friends of her dreams, etc etc etc of her dreams. For me, it was like losing the Cannie I cared about on page 50 and replacing her with some Cannie that had been turned into a sterilized Hollywood version of herself that had to be rescued by the handsome love interest who is rich and handsome and kind and smart (so on and so on) instead of saving herself like we had hoped.This book is good mindnumbing fun when you are riding the train to work every day, suffering through writing a Masters thesis while trying yourself to write a novel. But is it a great novel? Absolutely not. Just a little fun. But yeah, I might be putting the sequel on my TBR pile right now as we speak...more
This book is definitely chick-lit, but it wasn't all light and fluffy like I thought it would be; instead it got pretty deep towards the end, tackling some serious issues. I wish I could tell you what those issues are, but that would seriously spoil the whole thing for you should you decide to read it.Cannie Shapiro is an overweight journalist struggling to get over her ex-boyfriend. Along the way she joins a weight loss study, meets celebrities (as part of her job), travels to Hollywood to sell a manuscript, still struggles to get over the ex-boyfriend, tries to make sense of her father's abandonment, and then some bigger things happen. Remember the issues I can't tell you about? Well, it's big and serious, and executed excellently.Weiner is a great writer. And I don't just mean in the "good descriptions and character development" way, though she does that well, too. More importantly, Weiner knows how to write a humorous novel while simultaneously tackling a serious woman's issue and have the ending wrap up in a satisfying, not cliché way. In case you haven't guessed, I was very impressed with the way Weiner took a traditional chick-lit topic and used it to tackle a more serious plot. The book is almost ten years old (omg, where did this last decade go!?) so the references are outdated, but it was fun to look back at them. Overall, I'm glad to have finally read this!more
"good in bed" by Jennifer Weiner is a winner. As the cover describes, it is a heart warming Cinderella story set for today's ideals.This book follows Cannie, Shapiro, a twenty-something, magazine reporter who is one of the "large girls" of the world. Following her life with break-ups, unplanned mishaps, a bad father history, and low-self esteem, this book should be a fictionalized self-help book. However, this is a wonderful book. Uplifting, real, and encouraging. Anybody who reads this book will greatly enjoy it!more
Wasn't sure I would like this book when I picked it up but what a surprise! It was laugh-out-loud funny. I really enjoyed it and loved the heroine Cannie.Back Cover Blurb:Cannie Shapiro never wanted to be famous. The smart, sharp, plus-sized reporter was perfectly happy writing about other people's lives for her local newspaper. And for the past twenty-eight years, things have been tripping along nicely for Cannie.Sure, her mother has come charging out of the closet, and her father has long since dropped out of her world. But she loves her job, her friends, her dog and her life. She loves her apartment and her commodious, quilt-lined bed. She has made a tenuous peace with her body and she even felt okay about ending her relationship with her boyfriend Bruce. But now this.....more
Load more
scribd