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Editor’s Note

“The Writing Life...”

Funny, insightful, & engaging, this deeply personal look into the life & work of the prolific writer is a divine spark for any aspiring writer.
Alex K.
Scribd Editor
“Long live the King” hailed Entertainment Weekly upon publication of Stephen King’s On Writing. Part memoir, part master class by one of the bestselling authors of all time, this superb volume is a revealing and practical view of the writer’s craft, comprising the basic tools of the trade every writer must have. King’s advice is grounded in his vivid memories from childhood through his emergence as a writer, from his struggling early career to his widely reported, near-fatal accident in 1999—and how the inextricable link between writing and living spurred his recovery. Brilliantly structured, friendly and inspiring, On Writing will empower and entertain everyone who reads it—fans, writers, and anyone who loves a great story well told.

Topics: Inspirational, Creativity, Writing, 20th Century, Maine, and American Author

Published: Scribner on Oct 3, 2000
ISBN: 9780743211536
List price: $11.99
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Thank you Mr King. read more
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A down-to-earth, moving, painfully vivid description of King's life and his thoughts on the craft of writing. Not to be missed even if you're not a fan of his fiction.read more
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This delightful read is a fascinating account of how Stephen King became one of his generation's greatest storytellers. It is also an inspirational guide for anyone who wants to become a writer. His openness and honesty are endearing. His true-life account of almost getting killed is thrilling and heartbreaking. On the craft itself, King covers the field, from governing principles to detailed practical advice. He tells us what to him is important and what is unimportant. I have only one quibble: on page 224 of my hardback edition, King describes flashbacks as "boring and sort of corny." However, his 2006 novel "Lisey's Story" has flashbacks and flashbacks within flashbacks -- they are neither boring nor corny -- they're terrific!read more
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Thank you Mr King.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A down-to-earth, moving, painfully vivid description of King's life and his thoughts on the craft of writing. Not to be missed even if you're not a fan of his fiction.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This delightful read is a fascinating account of how Stephen King became one of his generation's greatest storytellers. It is also an inspirational guide for anyone who wants to become a writer. His openness and honesty are endearing. His true-life account of almost getting killed is thrilling and heartbreaking. On the craft itself, King covers the field, from governing principles to detailed practical advice. He tells us what to him is important and what is unimportant. I have only one quibble: on page 224 of my hardback edition, King describes flashbacks as "boring and sort of corny." However, his 2006 novel "Lisey's Story" has flashbacks and flashbacks within flashbacks -- they are neither boring nor corny -- they're terrific!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Having read quite a few books on writing, I now expect to disagree with some rules that writers put out there -- no joke, Stephen King is quite the master, but I'm not as offended by adverbs as he is. His process of drafting is also vastly different from mine. However, I have found that writing is more of a personal discovery, and it really does differ with each writer.There is a lot to appreciate in this book, though. I like the fact that King gives a lot of examples to prove his points. I learn so much more from examples than from simple explanations, so I really appreciated that. I also like that when King sets down a rule, he doesn't make it an absolute and even admits to falling victim to sloppy/indulgent writing himself. When he talks about how you shouldn't use adverbs, he straight-out admits that he wishes he used fewer, which is nice. It gives the book a very helpful, conversational feel instead of a "I know everything, so this is what you should do" kind of thing.The one thing that I really loved about On Writing: you can tell, throughout the entire thing how much King loves to write. He completely lays out the magic, and the utter pleasure of creating a story. I so enjoyed that. Besides giving solid writing advice, he inspires his readers by making them want to write. While reading, I kept thinking to myself, "I want to start on my story right now." Few books have that power.Anyone interested in writing should read this book. It's a fast-paced, entertaining read -- not at all like the dry reference-type book I think of when I think of "how-to" books. You'll enjoy it, you'll learn some good tips, and you'll be inspired. There's nothing more anyone can ask for.
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Say what you will about Stephen King's fiction, but in all his non-fiction - his forewords, his introductions, his EW column and this book - he's refreshingly honest, down-to-earth and easily readable. "On Writing" is part memoir and part writing guide, written as King was entering his fourth decade of being an author (and, if I'm not mistaken, had only recently been unseated by J.K. Rowling as the world's most popular author)."On Writing" begins with about a hundred pages of vignettes across King's life, beginning with his earlist memory and ending with him kicking his drug addiction in the 1980s. It moves on to a central section full of King's thoughts about writing (theme, plot, characters, dialogue etc) and advice on how to become a writer, and finishes with a section about his near-fatal 1999 car accident (painful even to read about, particularly since he chose to weave it into The Dark Tower series). One of the most interesting things throughout is his little thoughts on all kinds of things related to the trade: genre prejudice, the reliability of agents, anecdotes about writing at Rudyard Kipling's desk, and so on.King said he was aiming to write a book on writing without any bullshit, and I think he succeeded. He makes it quite clear throughout the book that there is no magic solution or bag of tricks to being a writer. You just have to work very hard. You have to write a lot and read a lot, and there's no getting around that. Creative writing classes and writing guides (including "On Writing") may help a little, but nothing will get you there in the end except hard work. Lazy people won't be writers (which I shirk from hearing, since I'm very lazy indeed).He also shoots down a common myth in the creative writing world - something almost taboo, in fact - which is that a bad writer can ever become a good writer, or that a good writer can ever become a great writer. A mediocre writer can become a good writer, but other than that, you either got it or you don't.It only took me a couple of days to breeze through, since Stephen King (being Stephen King) is quite easy to read:Grammar is not just a pain in the ass; it's the pole you grab to get your thoughts up on their feet and walking. Besides, all those simple sentences worked for Hemingway, didn't they? Even when he was drunk on his ass, he was a fucking genius.Whether you're a Stephen King fan, or an aspiring writer, this book is definitely worth a read. Roger Ebert (one of the greatest writers in modern America) called it the best book on writing since Strunk & White's "The Elements of Style," which I'll also have to get around to reading someday.
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Written with wit and honesty and a bit of literary snobbishness--Stephen King is entitled to his opinion and 99.9 percent of what he says about the writing process I agree with. Yes, King has talent but he has also put in his hours and works hard at what he does. What many forget, King not only started story-telling as a child, but he studied and taught literature as an adult--he knows the craft and has learned his lessons well from the masters. Best advice in the book to me is his simple mantra "Read a lot and write a lot." I love his personal memories, his honesty about his foibles are refreshingly unapologetic. He is not a victim. He never says, "Oh I didn't know what to do with my success so I drank and took drugs" A drunk is a drunk period! Wow! He was lucky enough to have his family step in and save him otherwise he could have been another brilliant but sad literary cautionary tale. He remembered the magic and the joy of writing he always got as a kid way before he had his first drink and was able to get back there. And now we all get to enjoy his victory when he shows us his latest book (chip). To date, I've read this book four times and sometimes sleep with it. So if some tabloid comes out saying that an unbalanced woman says she sleeps with Stephen King, don't worry Mrs. King, it is probably me.
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