Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
Consumption of alcohol: Illegal.

Football and other "violent" sports: Illegal.

Ownership of guns, chain saws, and/or large dogs: Illegal.

Body piercings, tattoos: Illegal.

It's late in the twenty-first century, and the United Safer States of America (USSA) has become a nation obsessed with safety. For Bo Marsten, a teenager who grew up in the USSA, it's all good. He knows the harsh laws were created to protect the people. But when Bo's temper flares out of control and he's sentenced to three years of manual labor, he's not so down with the law anymore.

Bo's forced to live and work in a factory in the Canadian tundra. The warden running the place is totally out of his mind, and cares little for his inmates' safety. Bo will have to decide what's worse: a society that locks people up for road rage, or a prison where the wrong move could make you polar bear food.

Topics: Dystopia

Published: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers on
ISBN: 9781439115268
List price: $9.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Rash
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
In the United Safer States of America, personal safety has become society’s obsession. French fries are illegal, contact sports have been banned, and obesity is a crime punishable by imprisonment.Teenager Bo Marsten has grown up in this ultra-safe environment, but he has trouble following the many rules. Rash is the story of how his “rash” behavior lands him in a prison camp run by a sadistic former football coach, where he must play an illegal and almost forgotten sport: tackle football. Wonderful narration with voices characterizing each individual. Probably boys from 6-9th grade will especially like it but I loved it as an adult too. As someone who grew up with concrete under my playstructure and riding my bike for years without a helmet, I can relate to the over emphasis on "safety".more
It was just kinda blah. And the female characters kept saying "Oh, Bo." Who says that? What kinda of response is that? Sure its nit-picking, but when it happens withing the first 30 pages and I have a stack of books at home. Yeah.more
Bo is from a family with a history: both his father and brother are incarcerated for anger-based crimes (road rage and a fistfight, respectively), and Bo is acutely aware of his own struggles with self-control. His rival, Karlohs, intentionally needles him, going so far as to give himself a rash and blame it on Bo. The resulting school-wide psychosomatic rash lands Bo in a heap of trouble, in spite of it not actually being his fault.. Name-calling has already put him on probation, so throwing a punch at Karlohs, while satisfying, seals his fate. Bo is off to the Canadian tundra to fill his 36-month sentence in a pizza factory, miles from nowhere and surrounded by hungry polar bears.

Work in the pizza factory isn’t unbearable, but it’s far from pleasant. However, things take a turn for the better when he’s accepted into the factory’s highly-selective, highly-illegal football team. Playing football gives Bo the outlet he never knew he’d been looking for, but it’s not enough to help him overcome all his fears. There are still those hungry polar bears on the other side of the fence, after all.

In between Bo’s athletic and personal problems, there’s the matter of his science-project AI he’d been working on when he was kicked out of school: Bork has somehow, against all odds, developed sentience and a sense of humor, and is now creeping through the WindO, a webghost with legal aspirations.

And thank goodness the government has stepped up to the plate to ensure the safety of its citizens! The United Safer States of America have outlawed virtually anything dangerous: alcohol, pocketknives, self-mutilation (tattoos and body piercing, mainly), even name-calling, which could damage the victim's feelings. The penal system, incarcerating nearly 25% of the population, is more about a labor force than corrections.

Lots of football details for the sports fans, plus humor and a main character you honestly root for, despite how many of his problems are entirely of his own making. 8th grade and up would likely enjoy this (older readers will get more out of it, of course), particularly reluctant-reader boys.more
I originally picked up this book because the opening lines looked interesting. It seemed to be a humorous look at life in the future. As I further read the book, though, I realized that I was not the demographic that the book was meant to hit. In lieu of a teenage boy reading this novel, here I was, a woman in my sixties wondering how I was going to get through this book or even whether to give up on it. I kept reading. I liked Bork, the cybernetic creation of Bo Marsten, who had built him as part of a high school project to create an intelligent personality from a part of his school's computer. Sadly, anger was not permitted in this future scenario so when Kharlos Minx moved in on Bo's love interest Maddy, Bo acted up to the point that he was sent to prison in the Canadian tundra. Should I continue reading, I wondered? Well, Bork came back and, irises spinning, amused me greatly. At one point in Bo's imprisonment, he was made to play football. This reader had just finished watching the (real life) Washington Redskin-Dallas Cowboys game so I took note when I read of a football team in this story called the RedShirts. Football to me is great. All of a sudden, I finished the book...and I liked it! No going back now.more
Read all 23 reviews

Reviews

In the United Safer States of America, personal safety has become society’s obsession. French fries are illegal, contact sports have been banned, and obesity is a crime punishable by imprisonment.Teenager Bo Marsten has grown up in this ultra-safe environment, but he has trouble following the many rules. Rash is the story of how his “rash” behavior lands him in a prison camp run by a sadistic former football coach, where he must play an illegal and almost forgotten sport: tackle football. Wonderful narration with voices characterizing each individual. Probably boys from 6-9th grade will especially like it but I loved it as an adult too. As someone who grew up with concrete under my playstructure and riding my bike for years without a helmet, I can relate to the over emphasis on "safety".more
It was just kinda blah. And the female characters kept saying "Oh, Bo." Who says that? What kinda of response is that? Sure its nit-picking, but when it happens withing the first 30 pages and I have a stack of books at home. Yeah.more
Bo is from a family with a history: both his father and brother are incarcerated for anger-based crimes (road rage and a fistfight, respectively), and Bo is acutely aware of his own struggles with self-control. His rival, Karlohs, intentionally needles him, going so far as to give himself a rash and blame it on Bo. The resulting school-wide psychosomatic rash lands Bo in a heap of trouble, in spite of it not actually being his fault.. Name-calling has already put him on probation, so throwing a punch at Karlohs, while satisfying, seals his fate. Bo is off to the Canadian tundra to fill his 36-month sentence in a pizza factory, miles from nowhere and surrounded by hungry polar bears.

Work in the pizza factory isn’t unbearable, but it’s far from pleasant. However, things take a turn for the better when he’s accepted into the factory’s highly-selective, highly-illegal football team. Playing football gives Bo the outlet he never knew he’d been looking for, but it’s not enough to help him overcome all his fears. There are still those hungry polar bears on the other side of the fence, after all.

In between Bo’s athletic and personal problems, there’s the matter of his science-project AI he’d been working on when he was kicked out of school: Bork has somehow, against all odds, developed sentience and a sense of humor, and is now creeping through the WindO, a webghost with legal aspirations.

And thank goodness the government has stepped up to the plate to ensure the safety of its citizens! The United Safer States of America have outlawed virtually anything dangerous: alcohol, pocketknives, self-mutilation (tattoos and body piercing, mainly), even name-calling, which could damage the victim's feelings. The penal system, incarcerating nearly 25% of the population, is more about a labor force than corrections.

Lots of football details for the sports fans, plus humor and a main character you honestly root for, despite how many of his problems are entirely of his own making. 8th grade and up would likely enjoy this (older readers will get more out of it, of course), particularly reluctant-reader boys.more
I originally picked up this book because the opening lines looked interesting. It seemed to be a humorous look at life in the future. As I further read the book, though, I realized that I was not the demographic that the book was meant to hit. In lieu of a teenage boy reading this novel, here I was, a woman in my sixties wondering how I was going to get through this book or even whether to give up on it. I kept reading. I liked Bork, the cybernetic creation of Bo Marsten, who had built him as part of a high school project to create an intelligent personality from a part of his school's computer. Sadly, anger was not permitted in this future scenario so when Kharlos Minx moved in on Bo's love interest Maddy, Bo acted up to the point that he was sent to prison in the Canadian tundra. Should I continue reading, I wondered? Well, Bork came back and, irises spinning, amused me greatly. At one point in Bo's imprisonment, he was made to play football. This reader had just finished watching the (real life) Washington Redskin-Dallas Cowboys game so I took note when I read of a football team in this story called the RedShirts. Football to me is great. All of a sudden, I finished the book...and I liked it! No going back now.more
Rash by Pete Hautman is set in the future in United States. Regulations have taken over and made everything extremely safe. Bo Marsten is a teenager that has an anger management issue. In this society, he is sent to jail for punching someone. At the prison, Bo is recruited to join the factory’s illegal football team. Bork, the artificial intelligence that Bo made, gets him released from prison. Bo then returns home but feels unsatisfied being so restricted. In the end, Bo goes to South America to get away from all the regulations. The cover is quite intriguing with an outline of an animal’s face and a man running. It tempts the reader to find out what that is all about. Those who like books with futuristic societies should read this book.more
Futuristic Sports Fiction. Middle School to HS average reader. Main Characters: Bo Marsten, (Gramps, “Rhino”, “Hammer”)After losing his temper too many times in a future world regulated for complete citizen safety, Bo is sent to work in a prison pizza factory (a McDonalds merger!) in the northern tundra. Many of his fellow inmates are in for similar misdemeanors, and Rhino is in for unsafe, self-destructive eating habits. The USA is now the USSA (the extra S for “safer”) and runs on the manpower provided by the large percentage of citizens imprisoned in work camps for misdemeanors. Any aggression, any strenuous contact sport, any reckless behavior is enough to go on record. USSA laws and municipal regulations are fear-of-litigation driven. Medication, Levelor, suppresses any emotional outbursts.Bo (who doesn’t take his Levelor, a misdemeanor in itself) is jealous about his girlfriend’s interaction with an arch track (running) rival. He loses his temper once too often after being blamed for a rash outbreak that is in fact a reaction to a skin cream. He ends up on a prison football squad coached by an ex-pro footballer, playing illegal contact sports against other prison teams (Coke!)When Bo’s computer A.I. creation, Bork, manages to arrange an early release, Bo is thrown out of the prison to fight his way to the nearest arctic town while avoiding polar bear attacks.Back home again, Bo must face hard realities: he doesn’t like his father, he has outgrown the soft high school life, and he knows he doesn’t want to live either like his maverick grandfather (a beer swilling relic of the late 20th century) or in obeisance to the minutiae of safety regulations. A move to another continent is inevitable.Some appeal, but this story doesn’t have the power or the strong social message of Feed. It does point out the power of teamwork and determination.more
Load more
scribd