Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
Entre los objetos personales de Frida Kahlo había una pequeña libreta negra a la que llamaba “El Libro de Hierba Santa” con su colección de recetas de cocina dedicadas a la Santa Muerte. Esta se exhibiría por primera vez en el Palacio de Bellas Artes con motivo de la fecha de su natalicio. El día que se abrió la exhibición al público la libreta desapareció.

F. G. Haghenbeck, uno de los escritores más aclamados en México, se inspiró en este hecho y escribió esta maravillosa novela, la cual trae una vez más a la vida a la famosa artista Frida Kahlo.

Haghenbeck imagina que esta libreta fue un regalo de su amante Tina Modotti, después de que Frida sobrevivió al terrible accidente de tráfico que marcó su vida. Desde este punto, Haghenbeck intercala recetas con pasajes vividos por la artista y reconstruye de una forma magistral la tumultuosa pero fascinante vida de Frida Kahlo, desde su romance con el amor de su vida y afamado pintor Diego Rivera, hasta sus relaciones con personajes famosos como Georgia O’Keeffe, Ernest Hemingway y Salvador Dalí, entre otros.
Published: Atria Books on Sep 25, 2012
ISBN: 9781451641455
List price: $11.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for El libro secreto de Frida Kahlo
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

She had such a pain filled life, but it was interesting and she met so many people who would become famous or infamous. This book combines the story of her life, with her many passions including food where the author includes some of her favorite recipes. There is some magical realism inserted in the form of the messenger and the godmother, with who she makes deals in order to keep living. This was a very interesting book with a non-typical form but I enjoyed quite a bit. My favorite parts were learning about the Mexican culture, including the food, superstitions, and day of the dead. Different for sure, but worth reading.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Frida, Frida, horny chiquita. She didn't get to live long, but she made sure not to get shortchanged in physical pleasure. She suffered such relentless, excruciating pain that she can't be blamed for wanting to drown it with carnal delights. At the age of six, Frida had polio, which left her with one withered and shortened leg. When she was a teenager, the trolley she was riding on was hit by a train. This accident left her with extensive injuries, including spinal damage and a punctured uterus that prevented her from having children. While bedridden after that accident, Frida took up painting as a way to escape the pain and hopelessness. Her fury and suffering formed her style as an artist. As portrayed in this novel, Frida Kahlo had two obsessions -- sex and Death. She was a boldly bi-sexual seductress, bedding everyone from Georgia O'Keefe to Leon Trotsky. Aside from Frida herself, character development is minimal in this novel. Even Diego Rivera is never fully personified. The story is in large part told using straight narrative. Sometimes it feels like an expository recitation of Frida's encounters with famous people, with few immediate scenes to bring life to these events. Where the author really shines is in his magical realism and dream sequences. As a native of Mexico, Haghenbeck understands the Mexican mindset that blurs the lines between the living and the dead, waking and dreamtime, and real versus magical.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.

Reviews

She had such a pain filled life, but it was interesting and she met so many people who would become famous or infamous. This book combines the story of her life, with her many passions including food where the author includes some of her favorite recipes. There is some magical realism inserted in the form of the messenger and the godmother, with who she makes deals in order to keep living. This was a very interesting book with a non-typical form but I enjoyed quite a bit. My favorite parts were learning about the Mexican culture, including the food, superstitions, and day of the dead. Different for sure, but worth reading.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Frida, Frida, horny chiquita. She didn't get to live long, but she made sure not to get shortchanged in physical pleasure. She suffered such relentless, excruciating pain that she can't be blamed for wanting to drown it with carnal delights. At the age of six, Frida had polio, which left her with one withered and shortened leg. When she was a teenager, the trolley she was riding on was hit by a train. This accident left her with extensive injuries, including spinal damage and a punctured uterus that prevented her from having children. While bedridden after that accident, Frida took up painting as a way to escape the pain and hopelessness. Her fury and suffering formed her style as an artist. As portrayed in this novel, Frida Kahlo had two obsessions -- sex and Death. She was a boldly bi-sexual seductress, bedding everyone from Georgia O'Keefe to Leon Trotsky. Aside from Frida herself, character development is minimal in this novel. Even Diego Rivera is never fully personified. The story is in large part told using straight narrative. Sometimes it feels like an expository recitation of Frida's encounters with famous people, with few immediate scenes to bring life to these events. Where the author really shines is in his magical realism and dream sequences. As a native of Mexico, Haghenbeck understands the Mexican mindset that blurs the lines between the living and the dead, waking and dreamtime, and real versus magical.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
scribd