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Publicada originalmente en seis partes, la novela gótica de King sobre la pena de muerte, envuelve a tres personajes: un guardia de seguridad, un asesino acusado de matar a dos niñas y un ratón con poderes sobrenaturales dentro de una prisión durante la época de la Depresión económica.
Published: Atria Books on
ISBN: 9781439183779
List price: $7.99
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I read this when I was a teenager, and I don't remember enjoying it very much. It's probably one of those that needs a re-read, since I'm seeing glowing reviews everywhere.more
A long time ago, I watched about half of the film, The Green Mile. I think my mum has the DVD, I'll have to get it out when I'm home at Easter, because I've read that the movie was pretty faithful to the book, and I want to see that. I actually read the book, all of it, today, putting it down now and again to eat, wash my hair and do some school work. Very reluctantly, I'll have you know.

I didn't actually cry at it, but I came pretty close. Ouch. Particularly this part, for me:

"He kill them with they love," John said. "They love for each other. You see how it was?"
I nodded, incapable of speech.
He smiled. The tears were flowing again, but he smiled. "That's how it is every day," he said, "all over the worl'." Then he lay down and turned his face to the wall.


The Green Mile is really quick to read, but I wouldn't call it easy. The characters are well-written. In fact, Percy, who is one of the most awful characters, is one of the best, because you can imagine him, right down to not wetting the sponge. You've probably known someone a bit like him, a bully, someone who never understands why people think he did something wrong. The other characters were pretty well-written, but Percy was probably the most memorable for me (just like you probably remember the bully from school, but you don't remember the quiet girl who sat in the corner and followed the rules).

Definitely worth reading. It's not horror, by a long shot, and I don't know why people dismiss Stephen King as "just a horror writer", or "not a writer", when he writes stuff like this.more
My first Stephen King novel, unless you count my reading "The Dead Zone" some 25 years ago or more. King certainly keeps things moving, but what surprised me was finding he is a moral writer in the sense that Tolstoy and John Gardner use the word. I am going to read more King stories.more
Good, but not great. Has it's share of occasional lulls, but generally absorbing. King once again comes up with an astounding character creation. Was more effective as a serial than a novel.more
While this book is very well written, I think on reflection, it is not King's best work. It seems overly sentimental and some of the characters come across as stereotypes. It can make you cry, though.more
This book was originally published in six parts. As a result, it's a bit more repetitive than other King books, but it is still a very good book. There are many similarities to the movie, but some differences as well. If you've seen the movie first (as I have), it's not disturbing however; reading the book adds to your comprehension of the story.more
This is my favorite King book (except for maybe Carrie). A view of what it's like for officers who have the job of working on death row but of course with the addition of some really unbelievable phenomena going on! I hate injustice and it really blew me away that John Coffey wasn't cleared of the murders.more
 Have you ever read a book and been so affected by it that it had you in tears? The Green Mile by Stephen King is amazing!. I sat there tearing every few pages or so. It's incredible - the emotion, the feelings... Just the sadness that's presented. It's a prison story, but moves beyond that, touching on human sensibilities, on human emotions. What I can talk about, however, is the emotions that the books caused to arise in me.Do you believe that people can be evil? Hmm, let me be more specific. Do you believe that a person can be bad, or evil, without having any good in them? After reading this book, I would say yes, there are people who don't have any good in them. I know, I know - the book is fiction, but that doesn't mean that it can't describe what can actually exist in real life. One of the characters in the book was completely... I don't know if I can use the word evil in this context, but I guess bad, vicious, wicked, cruel would seem like the appropriate description. Even when people gave him a break, after seeing the cruelty, it made no difference, he continued the same backbiting, sadistic ways of the past. And it didn't matter how many times he was "forgiven" or let off, it was the same. One particular part that hit me hard was this."Then I understood why he had panicked, why he'd fought us so hard. He thought we were going to put him in with Wild Bill Wharton; that his punishment for the dry sponge was to be a dry cornholing from the resident psychopath. Instead of feeling sympathy for Percy at this realization, I felt disgusted and a hardening of my resolve. He was, after all, judging us by the way he would have behaved, had our positions been reversed.". A person like this can't help but think others will do the same to him as he would to others. I guess that holds true to a certain degree for everyone too. But any how, great book. I read it in 1 week - I couldn't put it down. You really should check it out!...more
still an all time favoritemore
I remember spotting the first book of this series, titled "The Two Dead Girls" at the grocery store one night in the spring of 1996 while shopping. I have been reading SK since the 70's, so naturally I snapped this up. Every week I'd scour the book rack on each visit to the store, looking for the next part in the series. What a joy it was to anticipate each part of the story.I enjoyed reading this in this manner. It made me savor each twist and turn. I wasn't in a hurry to read to the end...as the end hadn't appeared on the book rack yet!more
Ruby's review of The Green Mile by Stephen KingLike everyone, I've seen the film of The Green Mile. Unlike everyone, I've not heard the film as I was in denial about my hearing loss for the past two decades. All the films I've watched have been looked at and not heard, so my attention wandered. I remember the mouse resurrection and that's about it. My recollections of other King stories in film are similar - Carrie and the burning sports hall, The Shining and Jack with the axe. There was an inertia I needed to overcome in even buying a Stephen King novel. I hate to walk with the crowd, Contrary Mary that I am. Eventually I picked up The Green Mile to complete a 3 for €10 offer in a shop in Dingle, Kerry. The title didn't even register with me at the time.Then I opened the book, began to read, recognised the premise of large, unnatural John Coffey on death row and was hooked.King uses Paul Edgecombe as first person narrator to great effect. The full horror of the death penalty is the overriding theme throughout. This is Death Row and execution is by electric chair so there are necessarily graphic scenes but they're gratifying without being gratuitous.Most of the book takes place within E Block at the Cold Mountain State Penitentiary. It's claustrophobic. The sweat and tears of prisoners and guards alike flows before the reader's face and sometimes on the reader's face. Each character comes to life, and some to death, in full 3D technicolor and the story is all about their interaction. The plot is bare bones, the reader wishing that the characters would catch up with what the reader has already divined, praying for the salvation that comes for some and not for others.Coffey's character is truly supernatural and would bring anyone close to Believing. I was simultaneously relieved and disappointed that Coffey let the gang off the hook in the end.The wrap up in the retirement home was very moving - to find love again at the end of the road, an absolution for wrongdoing and acknowledgement of human frailty in the face of death.Once or twice I was perplexed by the repetition at the start of new chapters but the author's afterword explains that the story was originally issued in instalments, so that's why recaps were built in.This is the kind of book that I could read again immediately, but my wife has already swiped it out of my hand!more
Stephen King should stick to writing these sorts of books. Don't get me wrong, I love most of his horror stuff, but it's this sort of subtle supernatural genre that I think really shows his talents as a writer and story-teller since the horror element isn't overshadowing everything else within the novel.The Green Mile is a little long, being comprised of 6 novellas and it is definitely slow-paced. That doesn't mean it isn't exciting, though! The slowness of the story really allowed me to delve into the characters and the story King has created. I felt like I got to know all the characters, especially Paul, whose first-person narrative it is. This made the action parts even better, since I had a connection with the characters and cared about them.I liked how the narrative jumped from Paul as an old man living in a nursing home to Paul as a middle-aged man meeting John Coffey. I think it added a lot to the intrigue, as there were multiple mysteries you were trying to solve at once. The Green Mile has a great message and is a compelling story that will leave you in tears by the end.I saw the movie before reading the book and honestly, if you've seen the movie, the novel won't add all that much for you. The movie is very true to the book and captures the most important events. Naturally, the book has other elements that added to my appreciation of the story. The parallelism between the prison and Paul's nursing home, for example, and a deeper understanding of the characters.There were some things I didn't like -- like I said, the pace sometimes seemed too slow at times. But then again, King's books always seem to drag just a little bit for me. I also didn't like how at times the characters all laughed at something as if it were hilarious, and I didn't think it was funny at all. Besides that, though, it was a good story and I enjoyed the read. I definitely recommend this.more
King's classic writing style. Enjoyed it. May have had a side character that I found annoying, but he was essential to the story.more
Due to the episodic nature of The Green Mile, there is a degree of redundancy in the narrative. Once that is put aside, King's tale of a death row convict who may be more than he seems is gripping and emotionally charged. The blurb claims it's a thriller, however not much happens to offer thrills and spills, the steady build up to the finale is certainly drama, possibly even melodrama. The real win for King with The Green Mile is the character development and the emotional ties he creates; the finale is empowered with an affecting charge and will resonate for some time after the final page has been turned.more
Even though I loved the film very very much I didn't manage to finish the book. After some chapters I gave up, it didn't take hold of me as strong as the film did. Pity great story though. (Maybe because I read it in French)more
This gripping tale of good against evil is impossible to put down. Set in a prison for those awaiting death by electric chair or 'Old Sparky' we see the best of humanity in prison officer Paul Edgecombe and his colleagues. One inmate in particular stands out as being pure evil - and it is not the giant black man guilty of the brutal murder of two little girls.more
King steps out of his genre and presents a novel that isn't riddled in the supernatural horror that usually makes up his books. Instead, he writes a story which focuses on the horrors of human capabilities; a novel that looks into the greatest and most horrifying depths of the human heart. A painfully brutal story that will leave you questioning your take on justice. I have never believed in capital punishment and the depths of emotion on this novel only reinforces my opinion. A must read...possibly King's best ever.more
My favourite by Stephen King. Some sections a bit grisly, but I guess you have to expect that from a horror writer. Chilling, fascinating, very moving, much better than the film, though as films of books go I thought it wasn't bad.more
An excellent series and a great movie. It's been almost 15 years since I read these books, but I remember enjoying them and being bummed I only had the first 3. I got them at the airport thinking they would last me the whole flight. Then after 3 hours of sitting in the plane, on the ground, and the 5 hour flight, I had torn through them. I couldn't wait to get to my destination and read the rest. While I love Stephen King's horror novels, his other works of fiction are just as compelling.more
Green Mile was not a good book at all. I hated it.. i only did read caz i had to read it for my english class.more
I had to think a bit about this one a bit. The serialization of this novel inherently made certain parts of it repetitive from section to section (a trick used by the author to remind the serial reader of what happened in the previous installment). However, I also believe that same (serial) format kept King from falling into some of the more annoying pitfalls he usually can't seem to avoid in his novels. Overall, I found both the story and the characters compelling and would rank this right up there with King's best.more
This is more than generic horror: It’s a human story that makes you question your views and values. Does a death-row inmate deserve respect? Is capital punishment justified at all? What is the significance of the electric chair when it just speeds up the inevitable? Is human vengeance ever warranted?I thought this book might loose something by being released in serial format. Now I’m convinced that its progressive released helped the story. In order to draw the reader back into the story each installment, King used a frame-narrative. An old man in a home for the aged spends the entire book writing out his memoirs (which become the book). In the end, the frame-narrative and the main story interact in marvelous ways.King is prolific enough to have some stinkers under his belt (like Rose Madder). Fortunately, most of his work shines. While this story doesn’t quite stand up to the scope of The Stand or The Dark Tower, The Green Mile (along with his other prison narrative: Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption) is one of his best.more
WARNING!!! This book could seriously disrupt your life on the grounds of it being almost impossible to put down. Originally written in six novellas in the Dickensian tradition The Green Mile tells the story of a group of prisoners and the guards who watch over them in a small 'death house', waiting their turn at the electric chair in 1932. It stands alongside his Dark Tower books as being some of King's finest work. I can only imagine what it must have been like having to read them novella by novella with time in between: It must have been like Hell and Christmas five times in a year.more
A beautiful book, that will make you spit with rage, smile with joy and cry with a deep sense of sadness and loss. For me this is Kings very best, never before and never since had i hated a character as much as Percy and loved one as much As John Coffey. I cried at the end and loved every second of this book, the film is fantastic, but this is in a different league.more
Synopsis:Paul Edgecomb works at the Cold Mountain Penitentiary, on Block E - The Green Mile. Most prisoners who come to the Green Mile, do not leave it alive. They leave on Old Sparky - the electric chair. 1932 was a memorable year for Paul - it was the year he had a severe urinary infection. It was also the year that Eduard Delacroix, John Coffey and William Wharton were prisoners on the Green Mile. John Coffey is giant of a man, who was tried for the rape and murder of twin blonde girls. Paul discovered something else about Coffey, a gift that he has. This gift presents a devastating truth that will follow Paul for the rest of his life.Pros & Cons: This was a great book and I don't know why I waited so long to read it. I have had it for years! I remember watching the movie when it came out and liked it as well. Something I did not realize before I began reading was that Stephen King issued this as a series of 6 books coming out once a month. I do have the complete 6 part novel, but didn't know why it was broken down into 6 books of roughly 90 pages each. King attempted to copy the format that Charles Dickens usually did - write novels in installments to keep the readers in suspense. I don't know if I would have been able to wait for the next book to come out!more
One of a handful of King where non-King fans don't believe you when you say this is a Stephen King book. Made me cry. I loved Coffey and Mr. Jinx.more
Not a typical Stephen King and why I love it. I like that Stephen incorporated his suspense and supernatural theme while drawing me in emotionally with the super sensitive, gentle giant, John Coffey. We follow him as he is arrested, accused, and sent to a 1930's jail for raping and killing two little white girls. Supernatural events begin to occur and key characters begin to wonder if they have the right man. I am so glad that I did not find out about this book when it was being released in six separate volumes! Get out your Kleenex and be prepared to fall in love with Mr. Jingles...more
I read this book when it came out in installments, I would read the book as soon as it came out and pass it on to a friend, I could not wait until the next one came ot. What a book, it is a great read. He tells a great story about John Coffee and his amazing faith. This is a must read book and the movie is so close to the book it isn't even funny.more
Read all 46 reviews

Reviews

I read this when I was a teenager, and I don't remember enjoying it very much. It's probably one of those that needs a re-read, since I'm seeing glowing reviews everywhere.more
A long time ago, I watched about half of the film, The Green Mile. I think my mum has the DVD, I'll have to get it out when I'm home at Easter, because I've read that the movie was pretty faithful to the book, and I want to see that. I actually read the book, all of it, today, putting it down now and again to eat, wash my hair and do some school work. Very reluctantly, I'll have you know.

I didn't actually cry at it, but I came pretty close. Ouch. Particularly this part, for me:

"He kill them with they love," John said. "They love for each other. You see how it was?"
I nodded, incapable of speech.
He smiled. The tears were flowing again, but he smiled. "That's how it is every day," he said, "all over the worl'." Then he lay down and turned his face to the wall.


The Green Mile is really quick to read, but I wouldn't call it easy. The characters are well-written. In fact, Percy, who is one of the most awful characters, is one of the best, because you can imagine him, right down to not wetting the sponge. You've probably known someone a bit like him, a bully, someone who never understands why people think he did something wrong. The other characters were pretty well-written, but Percy was probably the most memorable for me (just like you probably remember the bully from school, but you don't remember the quiet girl who sat in the corner and followed the rules).

Definitely worth reading. It's not horror, by a long shot, and I don't know why people dismiss Stephen King as "just a horror writer", or "not a writer", when he writes stuff like this.more
My first Stephen King novel, unless you count my reading "The Dead Zone" some 25 years ago or more. King certainly keeps things moving, but what surprised me was finding he is a moral writer in the sense that Tolstoy and John Gardner use the word. I am going to read more King stories.more
Good, but not great. Has it's share of occasional lulls, but generally absorbing. King once again comes up with an astounding character creation. Was more effective as a serial than a novel.more
While this book is very well written, I think on reflection, it is not King's best work. It seems overly sentimental and some of the characters come across as stereotypes. It can make you cry, though.more
This book was originally published in six parts. As a result, it's a bit more repetitive than other King books, but it is still a very good book. There are many similarities to the movie, but some differences as well. If you've seen the movie first (as I have), it's not disturbing however; reading the book adds to your comprehension of the story.more
This is my favorite King book (except for maybe Carrie). A view of what it's like for officers who have the job of working on death row but of course with the addition of some really unbelievable phenomena going on! I hate injustice and it really blew me away that John Coffey wasn't cleared of the murders.more
 Have you ever read a book and been so affected by it that it had you in tears? The Green Mile by Stephen King is amazing!. I sat there tearing every few pages or so. It's incredible - the emotion, the feelings... Just the sadness that's presented. It's a prison story, but moves beyond that, touching on human sensibilities, on human emotions. What I can talk about, however, is the emotions that the books caused to arise in me.Do you believe that people can be evil? Hmm, let me be more specific. Do you believe that a person can be bad, or evil, without having any good in them? After reading this book, I would say yes, there are people who don't have any good in them. I know, I know - the book is fiction, but that doesn't mean that it can't describe what can actually exist in real life. One of the characters in the book was completely... I don't know if I can use the word evil in this context, but I guess bad, vicious, wicked, cruel would seem like the appropriate description. Even when people gave him a break, after seeing the cruelty, it made no difference, he continued the same backbiting, sadistic ways of the past. And it didn't matter how many times he was "forgiven" or let off, it was the same. One particular part that hit me hard was this."Then I understood why he had panicked, why he'd fought us so hard. He thought we were going to put him in with Wild Bill Wharton; that his punishment for the dry sponge was to be a dry cornholing from the resident psychopath. Instead of feeling sympathy for Percy at this realization, I felt disgusted and a hardening of my resolve. He was, after all, judging us by the way he would have behaved, had our positions been reversed.". A person like this can't help but think others will do the same to him as he would to others. I guess that holds true to a certain degree for everyone too. But any how, great book. I read it in 1 week - I couldn't put it down. You really should check it out!...more
still an all time favoritemore
I remember spotting the first book of this series, titled "The Two Dead Girls" at the grocery store one night in the spring of 1996 while shopping. I have been reading SK since the 70's, so naturally I snapped this up. Every week I'd scour the book rack on each visit to the store, looking for the next part in the series. What a joy it was to anticipate each part of the story.I enjoyed reading this in this manner. It made me savor each twist and turn. I wasn't in a hurry to read to the end...as the end hadn't appeared on the book rack yet!more
Ruby's review of The Green Mile by Stephen KingLike everyone, I've seen the film of The Green Mile. Unlike everyone, I've not heard the film as I was in denial about my hearing loss for the past two decades. All the films I've watched have been looked at and not heard, so my attention wandered. I remember the mouse resurrection and that's about it. My recollections of other King stories in film are similar - Carrie and the burning sports hall, The Shining and Jack with the axe. There was an inertia I needed to overcome in even buying a Stephen King novel. I hate to walk with the crowd, Contrary Mary that I am. Eventually I picked up The Green Mile to complete a 3 for €10 offer in a shop in Dingle, Kerry. The title didn't even register with me at the time.Then I opened the book, began to read, recognised the premise of large, unnatural John Coffey on death row and was hooked.King uses Paul Edgecombe as first person narrator to great effect. The full horror of the death penalty is the overriding theme throughout. This is Death Row and execution is by electric chair so there are necessarily graphic scenes but they're gratifying without being gratuitous.Most of the book takes place within E Block at the Cold Mountain State Penitentiary. It's claustrophobic. The sweat and tears of prisoners and guards alike flows before the reader's face and sometimes on the reader's face. Each character comes to life, and some to death, in full 3D technicolor and the story is all about their interaction. The plot is bare bones, the reader wishing that the characters would catch up with what the reader has already divined, praying for the salvation that comes for some and not for others.Coffey's character is truly supernatural and would bring anyone close to Believing. I was simultaneously relieved and disappointed that Coffey let the gang off the hook in the end.The wrap up in the retirement home was very moving - to find love again at the end of the road, an absolution for wrongdoing and acknowledgement of human frailty in the face of death.Once or twice I was perplexed by the repetition at the start of new chapters but the author's afterword explains that the story was originally issued in instalments, so that's why recaps were built in.This is the kind of book that I could read again immediately, but my wife has already swiped it out of my hand!more
Stephen King should stick to writing these sorts of books. Don't get me wrong, I love most of his horror stuff, but it's this sort of subtle supernatural genre that I think really shows his talents as a writer and story-teller since the horror element isn't overshadowing everything else within the novel.The Green Mile is a little long, being comprised of 6 novellas and it is definitely slow-paced. That doesn't mean it isn't exciting, though! The slowness of the story really allowed me to delve into the characters and the story King has created. I felt like I got to know all the characters, especially Paul, whose first-person narrative it is. This made the action parts even better, since I had a connection with the characters and cared about them.I liked how the narrative jumped from Paul as an old man living in a nursing home to Paul as a middle-aged man meeting John Coffey. I think it added a lot to the intrigue, as there were multiple mysteries you were trying to solve at once. The Green Mile has a great message and is a compelling story that will leave you in tears by the end.I saw the movie before reading the book and honestly, if you've seen the movie, the novel won't add all that much for you. The movie is very true to the book and captures the most important events. Naturally, the book has other elements that added to my appreciation of the story. The parallelism between the prison and Paul's nursing home, for example, and a deeper understanding of the characters.There were some things I didn't like -- like I said, the pace sometimes seemed too slow at times. But then again, King's books always seem to drag just a little bit for me. I also didn't like how at times the characters all laughed at something as if it were hilarious, and I didn't think it was funny at all. Besides that, though, it was a good story and I enjoyed the read. I definitely recommend this.more
King's classic writing style. Enjoyed it. May have had a side character that I found annoying, but he was essential to the story.more
Due to the episodic nature of The Green Mile, there is a degree of redundancy in the narrative. Once that is put aside, King's tale of a death row convict who may be more than he seems is gripping and emotionally charged. The blurb claims it's a thriller, however not much happens to offer thrills and spills, the steady build up to the finale is certainly drama, possibly even melodrama. The real win for King with The Green Mile is the character development and the emotional ties he creates; the finale is empowered with an affecting charge and will resonate for some time after the final page has been turned.more
Even though I loved the film very very much I didn't manage to finish the book. After some chapters I gave up, it didn't take hold of me as strong as the film did. Pity great story though. (Maybe because I read it in French)more
This gripping tale of good against evil is impossible to put down. Set in a prison for those awaiting death by electric chair or 'Old Sparky' we see the best of humanity in prison officer Paul Edgecombe and his colleagues. One inmate in particular stands out as being pure evil - and it is not the giant black man guilty of the brutal murder of two little girls.more
King steps out of his genre and presents a novel that isn't riddled in the supernatural horror that usually makes up his books. Instead, he writes a story which focuses on the horrors of human capabilities; a novel that looks into the greatest and most horrifying depths of the human heart. A painfully brutal story that will leave you questioning your take on justice. I have never believed in capital punishment and the depths of emotion on this novel only reinforces my opinion. A must read...possibly King's best ever.more
My favourite by Stephen King. Some sections a bit grisly, but I guess you have to expect that from a horror writer. Chilling, fascinating, very moving, much better than the film, though as films of books go I thought it wasn't bad.more
An excellent series and a great movie. It's been almost 15 years since I read these books, but I remember enjoying them and being bummed I only had the first 3. I got them at the airport thinking they would last me the whole flight. Then after 3 hours of sitting in the plane, on the ground, and the 5 hour flight, I had torn through them. I couldn't wait to get to my destination and read the rest. While I love Stephen King's horror novels, his other works of fiction are just as compelling.more
Green Mile was not a good book at all. I hated it.. i only did read caz i had to read it for my english class.more
I had to think a bit about this one a bit. The serialization of this novel inherently made certain parts of it repetitive from section to section (a trick used by the author to remind the serial reader of what happened in the previous installment). However, I also believe that same (serial) format kept King from falling into some of the more annoying pitfalls he usually can't seem to avoid in his novels. Overall, I found both the story and the characters compelling and would rank this right up there with King's best.more
This is more than generic horror: It’s a human story that makes you question your views and values. Does a death-row inmate deserve respect? Is capital punishment justified at all? What is the significance of the electric chair when it just speeds up the inevitable? Is human vengeance ever warranted?I thought this book might loose something by being released in serial format. Now I’m convinced that its progressive released helped the story. In order to draw the reader back into the story each installment, King used a frame-narrative. An old man in a home for the aged spends the entire book writing out his memoirs (which become the book). In the end, the frame-narrative and the main story interact in marvelous ways.King is prolific enough to have some stinkers under his belt (like Rose Madder). Fortunately, most of his work shines. While this story doesn’t quite stand up to the scope of The Stand or The Dark Tower, The Green Mile (along with his other prison narrative: Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption) is one of his best.more
WARNING!!! This book could seriously disrupt your life on the grounds of it being almost impossible to put down. Originally written in six novellas in the Dickensian tradition The Green Mile tells the story of a group of prisoners and the guards who watch over them in a small 'death house', waiting their turn at the electric chair in 1932. It stands alongside his Dark Tower books as being some of King's finest work. I can only imagine what it must have been like having to read them novella by novella with time in between: It must have been like Hell and Christmas five times in a year.more
A beautiful book, that will make you spit with rage, smile with joy and cry with a deep sense of sadness and loss. For me this is Kings very best, never before and never since had i hated a character as much as Percy and loved one as much As John Coffey. I cried at the end and loved every second of this book, the film is fantastic, but this is in a different league.more
Synopsis:Paul Edgecomb works at the Cold Mountain Penitentiary, on Block E - The Green Mile. Most prisoners who come to the Green Mile, do not leave it alive. They leave on Old Sparky - the electric chair. 1932 was a memorable year for Paul - it was the year he had a severe urinary infection. It was also the year that Eduard Delacroix, John Coffey and William Wharton were prisoners on the Green Mile. John Coffey is giant of a man, who was tried for the rape and murder of twin blonde girls. Paul discovered something else about Coffey, a gift that he has. This gift presents a devastating truth that will follow Paul for the rest of his life.Pros & Cons: This was a great book and I don't know why I waited so long to read it. I have had it for years! I remember watching the movie when it came out and liked it as well. Something I did not realize before I began reading was that Stephen King issued this as a series of 6 books coming out once a month. I do have the complete 6 part novel, but didn't know why it was broken down into 6 books of roughly 90 pages each. King attempted to copy the format that Charles Dickens usually did - write novels in installments to keep the readers in suspense. I don't know if I would have been able to wait for the next book to come out!more
One of a handful of King where non-King fans don't believe you when you say this is a Stephen King book. Made me cry. I loved Coffey and Mr. Jinx.more
Not a typical Stephen King and why I love it. I like that Stephen incorporated his suspense and supernatural theme while drawing me in emotionally with the super sensitive, gentle giant, John Coffey. We follow him as he is arrested, accused, and sent to a 1930's jail for raping and killing two little white girls. Supernatural events begin to occur and key characters begin to wonder if they have the right man. I am so glad that I did not find out about this book when it was being released in six separate volumes! Get out your Kleenex and be prepared to fall in love with Mr. Jingles...more
I read this book when it came out in installments, I would read the book as soon as it came out and pass it on to a friend, I could not wait until the next one came ot. What a book, it is a great read. He tells a great story about John Coffee and his amazing faith. This is a must read book and the movie is so close to the book it isn't even funny.more
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