Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
Ciudad Juárez, México, queda en la frontera sur del Río Bravo, frente a El Paso, Texas. Por más de doce años, aquí se ha llevado a cabo un sinnúmero de crímenes atroces contra mujeres y niñas que incluyen secuestros, violaciones, mutilaciones y asesinatos. Según Amnistía Internacional, para 2006, se habían encontrado más de 400 cadáveres, sin contar centenares de desaparecidas.

Muchos creen que las muertes se deben a la violencia e impunidad que imperan en la ciudad. Entre las teorías que se proponen están uno o varios asesinos en serie, los sacrificios en rituales satánicos, el poderoso cartel del narcotráfico de Juárez y hasta corruptos funcionarios mexicanos que encubren a los responsables.
Las hijas de Juárez promete ser una reveladora obra literaria que revela no sólo la brutalidad tras estos sangrientos hechos, sino las violaciones de los derechos humanos de la mujer en México.
Published: Atria Books on Aug 25, 2009
ISBN: 9781439178195
List price: $13.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Las Hijas de Juarez (Daughters of Juarez) by Teresa Rodri...
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

Just across the United States-Mexico border in Juarez, nearly 400 bodies of women who had been tortured, raped, and murdered had been recovered by 2005 – with at least as many women counted in the ranks of the missing. Many of the bodies bore striking resemblances in the wounds and violence done to them, suggesting the work of one or more serial killers at work. Corrupt and inept government agencies, including the police and prosecutors, have still not closed more than a handful of the investigations, and even those that have been closed suggest frame-ups.Teresa Rodriguez, a Univision investigative reporter, describes the murders and failed investigations in minute detail, beginning with the earliest discoveries of brutalized and murdered women in the harsh desert outside Juarez, Mexico in 1995. Since that time, hundreds of women have gone missing, some resurfacing as partially skeletonized remains that bear the marks of extreme torture and violence. The question of who is responsible – one or more serial killers, narco-traffickers, police – remains unanswered. The only thing that rivals the brutalization of the victims is the brutalization of many of the ‘suspects’ in the search for ‘confessions.’ Ultimately, the story points as much to a disregard for human rights on any level as it does to a story of crime and justice. Rodriguez’ only failing is the sometimes melodramatic tone she sets with her prose. The story is urgent and gripping without any dressing up, and Rodriguez would have done well to stick to a more ‘just the facts, ma’am’ style to get her point across. Bottom Line: A largely unknown but important story – well-researched and well-told, if a little melodramatic sometimes.4 bones!!!!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the most disturbing book I have read. It is really hard to believe that it is true. I remember saying, "Oh my goodness", in my head several times while reading this book. I really hope that the people resposible for these crimes are found and brought to justice. I pray that Juarez will one day be a safe place to live.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.

Reviews

Just across the United States-Mexico border in Juarez, nearly 400 bodies of women who had been tortured, raped, and murdered had been recovered by 2005 – with at least as many women counted in the ranks of the missing. Many of the bodies bore striking resemblances in the wounds and violence done to them, suggesting the work of one or more serial killers at work. Corrupt and inept government agencies, including the police and prosecutors, have still not closed more than a handful of the investigations, and even those that have been closed suggest frame-ups.Teresa Rodriguez, a Univision investigative reporter, describes the murders and failed investigations in minute detail, beginning with the earliest discoveries of brutalized and murdered women in the harsh desert outside Juarez, Mexico in 1995. Since that time, hundreds of women have gone missing, some resurfacing as partially skeletonized remains that bear the marks of extreme torture and violence. The question of who is responsible – one or more serial killers, narco-traffickers, police – remains unanswered. The only thing that rivals the brutalization of the victims is the brutalization of many of the ‘suspects’ in the search for ‘confessions.’ Ultimately, the story points as much to a disregard for human rights on any level as it does to a story of crime and justice. Rodriguez’ only failing is the sometimes melodramatic tone she sets with her prose. The story is urgent and gripping without any dressing up, and Rodriguez would have done well to stick to a more ‘just the facts, ma’am’ style to get her point across. Bottom Line: A largely unknown but important story – well-researched and well-told, if a little melodramatic sometimes.4 bones!!!!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the most disturbing book I have read. It is really hard to believe that it is true. I remember saying, "Oh my goodness", in my head several times while reading this book. I really hope that the people resposible for these crimes are found and brought to justice. I pray that Juarez will one day be a safe place to live.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
scribd