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Sixteen-year-old Lucy Szabo is Undead -- at least according to her own theories about vampirism. Lucy believes that the first vampires -- with their pale skin, long teeth, and uncontrollable thirst -- were dying diabetics. And she should know. She's a diabetic herself.
When Lucy becomes involved with Draco -- a self-proclaimed "real" vampire she meets in the Transylvania Internet chat room -- her world begins crashing down around her. Caught up in late-night parties and Goth culture, she begins to lose control of her grades, relationships, and health. Lucy realizes she needs to make some important choices, and fast. But it may already be too late.

Topics: Vampires

Published: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers on Aug 31, 2010
ISBN: 9781439108741
List price: $8.99
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Wow. This book was really good. Lucy, whose online handle is Sweetblood, has diabetes, and doesn’t really have a good handle on it, despite the fact that she’s lived with it for at least 10 years now. She feels ostracized at school because of it, has been pissed off for years about it, and has developed a fascination with vampires. Then this new boy comes to her school and he introduces her to a guy who claims to be a real vampire. This book has some great stuff in it, about vampires, about living with diabetes, about goths, about life in general. It really was a fantastic book.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Sixteen-year-old Lucy Szabo used to get A’s in school. But lately, she wears black, chats online with “vampires,” and considers herself one of the “undead.” She’s even begun to avoid her best friend, because he now seems “too normal.”When Lucy turns in a class assignment describing her theory about how vampires were probably just people with Diabetes, she proclaims herself to be one of them (or, at least, a “Proto-vampire”) since she is also diabetic. Alarmed by their daughter’s changed behavior and attitude, Lucy’s parents take away her computer and insist she see a Psychiatrist. Lucy responds to her punishment by beginning a relationship with a boy who is new to the school, who further involves her in the Goth subculture. Sneaking out for late- night parties at the houses of self-proclaimed vampires with her new boyfriend, Lucy becomes vulnerable to several attempts at seduction by a “Vampire” whom she has chatted with online.She also decides she is tired of being controlled by her diabetes and neglects managing it, which almost results in tragedy. The book accurately conveys how some intelligent teens, angry at their parents, life, the world, etc., may gravitate toward the Goth culture as a means of expressing their dissatisfaction with their situation. The sarcasm and lack of respect Lucy displays toward her parents and other adults appears to be typical of many teens. True to the Young Adult fiction format, the adults in the story are fairly weak and unimportant, so that Lucy’s struggle for self- enlightenment and empowerment is emphasized.While the premise of the story is nothing new, the description of the Goth culture, along with Lucy’s obsessive interest in vampires makes it attractive to many teens, who are intensely curious about such things. Readers will, no doubt, also become much more aware of the impact such a disease as diabetes can have upon a teen. Those readers whohappen to have the disorder themselves will certainly be able to identify with Lucy’s struggle.The book’s message is subtle, but important: making poor choices with one’s health can have drastic consequences; while some people might appear to be cool, they may also be untrustworthy and downright dangerous; the least cool people, namely, one’s parents and childhood friends, could also be one’s best allies.This book is definitely worth adding to any high school library collection. It would also be appropriate for middle school collections, as it contains no inappropriate sexuality, violence, or language.read more
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love it
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Wow. This book was really good. Lucy, whose online handle is Sweetblood, has diabetes, and doesn’t really have a good handle on it, despite the fact that she’s lived with it for at least 10 years now. She feels ostracized at school because of it, has been pissed off for years about it, and has developed a fascination with vampires. Then this new boy comes to her school and he introduces her to a guy who claims to be a real vampire. This book has some great stuff in it, about vampires, about living with diabetes, about goths, about life in general. It really was a fantastic book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Sixteen-year-old Lucy Szabo used to get A’s in school. But lately, she wears black, chats online with “vampires,” and considers herself one of the “undead.” She’s even begun to avoid her best friend, because he now seems “too normal.”When Lucy turns in a class assignment describing her theory about how vampires were probably just people with Diabetes, she proclaims herself to be one of them (or, at least, a “Proto-vampire”) since she is also diabetic. Alarmed by their daughter’s changed behavior and attitude, Lucy’s parents take away her computer and insist she see a Psychiatrist. Lucy responds to her punishment by beginning a relationship with a boy who is new to the school, who further involves her in the Goth subculture. Sneaking out for late- night parties at the houses of self-proclaimed vampires with her new boyfriend, Lucy becomes vulnerable to several attempts at seduction by a “Vampire” whom she has chatted with online.She also decides she is tired of being controlled by her diabetes and neglects managing it, which almost results in tragedy. The book accurately conveys how some intelligent teens, angry at their parents, life, the world, etc., may gravitate toward the Goth culture as a means of expressing their dissatisfaction with their situation. The sarcasm and lack of respect Lucy displays toward her parents and other adults appears to be typical of many teens. True to the Young Adult fiction format, the adults in the story are fairly weak and unimportant, so that Lucy’s struggle for self- enlightenment and empowerment is emphasized.While the premise of the story is nothing new, the description of the Goth culture, along with Lucy’s obsessive interest in vampires makes it attractive to many teens, who are intensely curious about such things. Readers will, no doubt, also become much more aware of the impact such a disease as diabetes can have upon a teen. Those readers whohappen to have the disorder themselves will certainly be able to identify with Lucy’s struggle.The book’s message is subtle, but important: making poor choices with one’s health can have drastic consequences; while some people might appear to be cool, they may also be untrustworthy and downright dangerous; the least cool people, namely, one’s parents and childhood friends, could also be one’s best allies.This book is definitely worth adding to any high school library collection. It would also be appropriate for middle school collections, as it contains no inappropriate sexuality, violence, or language.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
16 year old Lucy has a strange fascination with vampires and spends most of her free time online talking in the Transylvania chat room. Lucy is trying to manage school, her parents, her new crush Dylan, and her diabetes. But when Draco, who claims to be a real vampire, finds Lucy outside of the internet world her life becomes even more complicated.This book shows the struggle of children who have diabetes. It’s written in the diabetic’s point of view and explains that they want to keep their diabetes under control but still retain as much of a normal lifestyle as everyone else.Extension Ideas1. Explain what diabetes is and how it affects your body.2. Discuss internet safety. Have the class perform a skit containing what you should and shouldn’t do.
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Lucy is a 16 year old insulin dependent diabetic who has a theory that the vampire myth originated with untreated diabetics. Poignant, well told story of a girl figuring out who she is and what’s important.
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I really loved this book when I read it. I loved how I was able to relate to the main character. This is a book think I could read over and over. It also seem's like a perfect book for those of us coming of age.
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