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Editor’s Note

“Baseball & Nuclear War...”

A lyric & panoramic evocation of a lost time, this haunting novella about Cold War dread also happens to be one of the most sublime pieces of sportswriting in American literature.
Scribd Editor

From the Publisher


"There's a long drive.

It's gonna be.

I believe.

The Giants win the pennant.

The Giants win the pennant.

The Giants win the pennant.

The Giants win the pennant."

-- Russ Hodges, October 3, 1951


On the fiftieth anniversary of "The Shot Heard Round the World," Don DeLillo reassembles in fiction the larger-than-life characters who on October 3, 1951, witnessed Bobby Thomson's pennant-winning home run in the bottom of the ninth inning. Jackie Gleason is razzing Toots Shor in Leo Durocher's box seats; J. Edgar Hoover, basking in Sinatra's celebrity, is about to be told that the Russians have tested an atomic bomb; and Russ Hodges, raw-throated and excitable, announces the game -- the Giants and the Dodgers at the Polo Grounds in New York. DeLillo's transcendent account of one of the iconic events of the twentieth century is a masterpiece of American sportswriting.
Published: Scribner on
ISBN: 9781439105443
List price: $2.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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