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From the Publisher

"An important step towards a new consciousness that will change the planet." -- Paolo Coelho
Have you ever ignored a coincidence -- and wished you hadn't?
Have you ever denied the truth of a dream -- and wished you didn't?
Have you ever disregarded a hunch -- only to regret it?

Then you have heard the new language of God.
Albert Clayton Gaulden, founder and director of the Sedona Intensive, believes that the new language is God's mother tongue, the language in which His messages and guidance are expressed. Experiential and laden with messages, the new language isn't spoken chiefly in words (though sometimes it comes to us that way); it is rich in signs, symbols, wonders, and coincidences. When we open ourselves up to the new language, we can open ourselves to a larger and better life. When we learn to be receptive to the new language, we can begin to understand its unique grammar and rules, and to benefit from its grace.
Signs and Wonders is an innovative work that offers practical strategies, anecdotes, case studies, and stories of personal transformation to expand our awareness of the new language. It teaches us how to listen to God and to understand the answers to our prayers, to know if we are on the right track when plagued by worry, doubt, and uncertainty. Focusing on the process that the author uses in his groundbreaking work as director of the Sedona Intensive, Signs and Wonders can help us all to learn how to clear "God's channel" and to master a new form of communication.
"If prayer is about talking to God, the new language is about listening for His answers."

Topics: Angels

Published: Atria Books on
ISBN: 9780743480215
List price: $11.99
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