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Pollyanna's eternal optimism has made her one of the most beloved characters in American literature. First published in 1913, her story spawned the formation of "Glad" clubs all over the country, devoted to playing Pollyanna's famous game. Pollyanna has since sold over one million copies, been translated into several languages, and has become both a Broadway play and a Disney motion picture.

Topics: Orphans, Childhood, Family, Made into a Movie, Female Protagonist, Inspirational, Adventurous, and 1910s

Published: Aladdin on
ISBN: 9781442458345
List price: $7.99
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Originally published in 1913, this tale of a young orphan girl who comes to live with her aunt in a small Vermont town, transforming everyone she meets with her "glad game," is one of those classic stories featuring a hero or heroine whose name has become a byword for a particular quality or idea. Just as we speak of someone who refuses to act maturely as having a "Peter Pan complex," or describe a rags-to-riches transformation as a "Cinderella story," so too do we refer to someone with a tendency toward optimism as a "Pollyanna." Before we had an entire industry of self-help gurus advising us of the power of positive thinking, we had Eleanor H. Porter's Pollyanna, which follows the story of the eponymous Pollyanna Whittier, and her "overwhelming, unquenchable gladness for everything that has ever happened or is going to happen."Arriving in Beldingsville, Vermont from the western prairie, where her missionary father has just recently died, Pollyanna eagerly anticipates living with her Aunt Polly Harrington, for whom she is (partially) named. Although her reception is far from ideal - stern Aunt Polly looks upon her young niece as a duty, rather than a joyful addition to her well-to-do household - she perseveres in looking on the bright side of matters, viewing punishments as rewards, and laughing off many of the cold rebuffs she receives. Finding friendship elsewhere, Pollyanna teaches everyone in town, from the Harrington housemaid, Nancy, to reclusive neighbor John Pendleton, how to play the "game" - in which the player looks for something to be glad about in every occurrence in their lives - taught to her by her father as a young girl. When Pollyanna is struck by an automobile, and loses the use of her legs, the "glad girl" suddenly finds that she can no longer play the game, and that it is she who needs a little cheering up.Chosen as our February selection over in The L.M. Montgomery Book Club to which I belong, where we sometimes like to read book that are "in the spirit" of L.M. Montgomery, Pollyanna is one of those classics of which I have long been aware, but which I have never happened to pick up. Being familiar with the general story, I have always associated it in my mind with the kind of orphan narrative to be found in books like Anne of Green Gables, or Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm. I'm very glad it was chosen by the club, as this has given me the push I needed to finally read it, thereby confirming my impression of it as being akin to L.M. Montgomery and Kate Douglas Wiggin's work. That said, although I found it readable enough (I got through most of it in one sitting), it wasn't quite as appealing as I'd expected it to be, and I thought that the charm sometimes wore a little thin. I appreciate the message of trying to find the good around us, but discovered that Pollyanna was just a little too positive for my taste - so positive that I started to become irritated with her. There was a point, midway through the book, when I felt that if I had to read one more scene involving Pollyanna laughing off something nasty, I would tear my hair out!I vacillated quite a bit between a two and three star rating with this one, trying to balance my irritation with the heroine, and my overall engagement in the story. I can't deny that I enjoyed reading Pollyanna, despite my irritation, so I rounded up. Of course, I'm not sure I enjoyed it enough to hunt down the sequels any time soon.more
Pollyanna (1913) by Eleanor H. Porter is now mainly read as a children's book, but is wasn't written or intended as such. It was an immediate bestseller and influenced many people and popular culture during the first quarter of the twentieth century.The story is about a young girl, who, as an orphan, is sent to live with her aunt, the stern Miss Polly. Pollyanna's father has taught her a game, which consists of always seeing things and situations in a positive light, and always being delighted with anything, in short, always be glad. The young, bright, innocent Polyanna spreads this belief, and starts influencing the people around her.Within a few months she has made friends with most people in the community, even people, such as Mr Pendleton, who was considered to be unapproachable. Her unlimited optimism cheers up all the people around her, and brings people together, who were separated through years of miserly sorrow and anguish.Underlying Polyanna's "glad game" lies the idea that everyone should be happy with small things. There are subtle suggestions that money is not the most important thing in life, and that apart from money there are many other things that may make people happy. The novel also suggests that Americans should care for each other before caring for others, far away, as there were still many poor and needy people within the US, at that time.To the modern reader the book may appear repetitive and very simple, probably why it is now seen as a children's book. Because of its young protagonist, and its message, the novel also seems aimed at children. However, it is likely that children will merely focus on the superficial and rather simplistic message about being happy with anything, while missing the more subtle criticism on a society which is increasingly ruled by money, turning people in miserly Scrooges, having a lot of money, but unable to find happiness in life.more
This was one of my childhood favourites and I was prepared to be disillusioned - I read What Katy Did last year and came away wondering why I had ever enjoyed something so apparently sanctimonious - but that didn't happen. I could see exactly why I had loved Pollyanna as a child and sat sniffing at the sad bits and wishing I has a tissue.For those that don't know the book, here goes. Incredibly happy young orphan girl Pollyanna goes to live with her bad-tempered spinster Aunt Polly in the early years of the twentieth century. Pollyanna's cheerfulness touches the heart of everyone she meets, changing lives and eventually melting the heart of the stone-faced Aunt Polly. Obviously there's more plot than that but that's it in a nutshell. Incredibly sentimental and I loved every minute of it.I have to say though that I can't imagine a modern child reading and enjoying it the way I did. Childhood's moved on too much. But I still loved it.more
This book is definitely a retread of themes that had already surfaced in children's literature like "Anne of Green Gables" and "Heidi:" a girl with an insufferably positive spirit brightens the world of the gloomy adults around her. However, in spite of the repetition throughout the book of that single theme, it is still an enjoyable read and probably strengthened by the author's willingness to permit tragedy to befall the main character, testing her resolve and creating a chance to show maturity and depth. There are a couple of secrets that are supposed to seem mysterious to some of the characters within the book, but that I at least figured out quite quickly. I don't remember whether the answers seemed that obvious when I was a child reading this book, but even if they did, the fact that you're in the know and proven right about your assumptions always feels a little bit good, and there is at least one red herring to throw a wrench in what otherwise might be a predictable plot. This is an appealing story for girls of all ages.more
Orphaned Pollyanna is a very bright and cheerful girl who are sent to live with her cold and reserved aunt. Throughout the novel she plays "the glad game" - always finding something positive in the most unhappy circumstances - and she befriends several persons and helps them while the aunt is kept completely in the dark. Her "glad game" comes to a difficult personal test in the last part of the story.It reminded me a lot both in story line and spirit of Heidi and Little Lord Fauntleroy - also both children who have a very innocent and gullible nature - thinking always the best of people. I liked this american Children's classic a lot. The audiobook was read by S. Patricia Bailey - with just the right innocent voice for Pollyanna.more
Pollyanna is that joyful book character that we never find in contemporary children’s literature. It was so refreshing to read this old story and revel in her ability to play the Glad Game, to find something good in any situation, and to see how this ability changed the lives of all who were around her. Pollyanna, to my surprise, was not the priggish, bamby-pamby, goody-goody-two-shoes I’d been led to believe she was. Instead she was a real girl who actually put into action the ideas of joy and service to others in her everyday life. A delightful read.more
Pollyanna is that joyful book character that we never find in contemporary children’s literature. It was so refreshing to read this old story and revel in her ability to play the Glad Game, to find something good in any situation, and to see how this ability changed the lives of all who were around her. Pollyanna, to my surprise, was not the priggish, bamby-pamby, goody-goody-two-shoes I’d been led to believe she was. Instead she was a real girl who actually put into action the ideas of joy and service to others in her everyday life. A delightful read.more
Unloved and unwanted, orphan Pollyanna Whittier boards an eastbound train to live with her Aunt Polly, a wealthy spinster. Aunt Polly treats the child insensitively, giving her a musty room in the attic and expecting her to keep quiet and stay out of the way. Pollyanna, with her optimistic outlook on life, turns all the lemons thrown her way into lemonade; punishments are viewed as rewards, unfriendly people in town are befriended. Pollyanna's "Glad Game" is soon played by all the people of the town. A terrible accident with a motor car as she is crossing the street finally breaks Pollyanna's spirit. When long-held secrets are finally revealed, even Aunt Polly comes around to warming up not only to her niece, but to a relationship she had long denied herself.more
Unloved and unwanted, orphan Pollyanna Whittier boards an eastbound train to live with her Aunt Polly, a wealthy spinster. Aunt Polly treats the child insensitively, giving her a musty room in the attic and expecting her to keep quiet and stay out of the way. Pollyanna, with her optimistic outlook on life, turns all the lemons thrown her way into lemonade; punishments are viewed as rewards, unfriendly people in town are befriended. Pollyanna's "Glad Game" is soon played by all the people of the town. A terrible accident with a motor car as she is crossing the street finally breaks Pollyanna's spirit. When long-held secrets are finally revealed, even Aunt Polly comes around to warming up not only to her niece, but to a relationship she had long denied herself.more
There are many classics that I did not read as a child. Treasure Island, Frankenstein, Robinson Crusoe, Around the World in 80 Days, and Little Women are but a few.However, I vow to systematically read these treasures in the next few months. Today I read Pollyanna.Published in 1913, this gem stands the test of time. It is delightfully sappy, corny and wonderfully filled with old fashioned fun.Pollyanna is an orphan whose father left her with the wonderful gift of optimism and the ability to find something to be glad about even in the most difficult situations.When chatty, gregarious Pollyanna is taken in by her stern, hardened Aunt Polly, magic occurs. Not only is Aunt Polly changed, but the entire town is transformed as well.If you haven't read this classic, I recommend you do so! Grab a pair of rose colored glasses, a cup of sugared hot chocolate, a sprinkling of holiday cheer and be prepared to smile.more
There are many classics that I did not read as a child. Treasure Island, Frankenstein, Robinson Crusoe, Around the World in 80 Days, and Little Women are but a few.However, I vow to systematically read these treasures in the next few months. Today I read Pollyanna.Published in 1913, this gem stands the test of time. It is delightfully sappy, corny and wonderfully filled with old fashioned fun.Pollyanna is an orphan whose father left her with the wonderful gift of optimism and the ability to find something to be glad about even in the most difficult situations.When chatty, gregarious Pollyanna is taken in by her stern, hardened Aunt Polly, magic occurs. Not only is Aunt Polly changed, but the entire town is transformed as well.If you haven't read this classic, I recommend you do so! Grab a pair of rose colored glasses, a cup of sugared hot chocolate, a sprinkling of holiday cheer and be prepared to smile.more
I remember reading the Golden Books version of this story as a kid, and wanted to read the novel now given it's status as a classic. I was pleased to find that although the language has dated, the moral of the story is still very valid in today's society (usually the case in a classic). Pollyanna was an easy and uplifting read, and I would recommend it to anyone wanting a break from reading heavy crime novels, and who need a little 'sunlight' between the pages.more
I remember reading the Golden Books version of this story as a kid, and wanted to read the novel now given it's status as a classic. I was pleased to find that although the language has dated, the moral of the story is still very valid in today's society (usually the case in a classic). Pollyanna was an easy and uplifting read, and I would recommend it to anyone wanting a break from reading heavy crime novels, and who need a little 'sunlight' between the pages.more
I've just finished a re-read of Eleanor Porter's "Pollyanna," which apparently I had read a number of times when I was younger, because I remembered every single little aspect of the plot. I suppose many people already have at least a passing familiarity with this tale, which was first published in 1912 and has been reprinted many times since then, as well as having been adapted for the screen on numerous occasions.I confess, I was surprised at how well this story held up when read through adult eyes. Oh, it's rather sentimental, true enough, but perhaps I'm not as jaded as I would like to think I am because some of the sentimental/emotional passages totally did a number on me!Obviously this book has staying power, though the nearly dozen sequels that followed (written by a number of various authors) have long since faded from the public's memory. To the best of my recollection, the first Pollyanna book is far superior to those that followed, but I still wouldn't call it perfect. The "plucky orphan" character has long been a staple of children's literature and has appeared in many guises throughout the years, but immediately after I started reading the book I got a very strong "Anne of Green Gables" vibe, "Anne" having been published four years previously to the first printing of this story. This feeling of déjà vu continued on and off throughout the novel, and I couldn't help but wonder if Porter was influenced by Maud Montgomery's work.Despite a number of interesting little sub-plots, the narrative of Pollyanna is rather loose and episodic, and I think I would have liked to see all the story elements woven together more completely. I also noted that a handful of key scenes were played off-stage, and only referred to by the characters in passing, which seemed a bit odd to me.But, I suppose the primary problem I have with Pollyanna is the heroine herself. She's just TOO good, TOO sweet, TOO everlastingly charming and upbeat to be the least bit believable. Now, I wouldn't say that she is OFFENSIVELY good---unlike the horribly sanctimonious Elsie Dinsmore (a favourite Victorian child heroine), Pollyanna doesn't preach to the other characters or give the impression that she's morally superior to everyone else. But Pollyanna didn't come across as a natural little girl for me; she pales not only into insignificance, but into invisibility, in comparison to the marvellous Anne Shirley of the "Green Gables" books. In addition, I would say that Pollyanna's general naïveté might have a certain charm in a child half her age, but in a ten- or eleven-year-old character, it just seems a bit odd. I don't want to sound too mean-spirited, but you'd almost think that she has some sort of developmental disability. So, the portrayal of the main character is kind of a major drawback to the novel.Still, despite a somewhat mixed review, I'm going to recommend this story; I think at least some young people of today would enjoy it, though obviously it will probably have more appeal to young girls than to young boys. And if you have even a passing interest in vintage children's literature, this book should be read at least once, as it's been so iconic in the field of American juvenile lit. I'll give it four stars, with the high rating due in part to the nostalgia factor, since I did enjoy this very much when I was young.(You know, from my youthful reading I remember Aunt Polly as being very old in this book---so imagine my surprise to learn that the character is actually five years younger than I am at present. Man, I am so totally depressed now...)This book has been published in many varying editions over the years (including an abridged paperback version for the school market, sold by Scholastic). The copy I've just read is the same one that I had as a child, published by The Page Company in 1914. It really is a lovely edition, and I would recommend this particular version if you can find it. The boards are covered in a green patterned cloth that catches the light in different ways, depending on the angle you look at it. Tilt it one way and you'll see a diamond pattern of light fleur-de-lis on a dark background, tilt again and it's dark fleur-de-lis over stripes, tilt again and you'll mostly see just the stripes, tilt again and the light stripes turn dark and the dark stripes turn light----okay, okay---you get the idea I'm sure! Now, I know there must be a name for this sort of material---but I know almost nothing about fabric and so can't describe it using the correct terminology.This edition also has eight illustrations tipped in; full-page black-and-white paintings printed on glossy paper. This once again reminds me that it's a real shame so few juvenile titles contain pictures in the present day---these are quite nice.more
I've just finished a re-read of Eleanor Porter's "Pollyanna," which apparently I had read a number of times when I was younger, because I remembered every single little aspect of the plot. I suppose many people already have at least a passing familiarity with this tale, which was first published in 1912 and has been reprinted many times since then, as well as having been adapted for the screen on numerous occasions.I confess, I was surprised at how well this story held up when read through adult eyes. Oh, it's rather sentimental, true enough, but perhaps I'm not as jaded as I would like to think I am because some of the sentimental/emotional passages totally did a number on me!Obviously this book has staying power, though the nearly dozen sequels that followed (written by a number of various authors) have long since faded from the public's memory. To the best of my recollection, the first Pollyanna book is far superior to those that followed, but I still wouldn't call it perfect. The "plucky orphan" character has long been a staple of children's literature and has appeared in many guises throughout the years, but immediately after I started reading the book I got a very strong "Anne of Green Gables" vibe, "Anne" having been published four years previously to the first printing of this story. This feeling of déjà vu continued on and off throughout the novel, and I couldn't help but wonder if Porter was influenced by Maud Montgomery's work.Despite a number of interesting little sub-plots, the narrative of Pollyanna is rather loose and episodic, and I think I would have liked to see all the story elements woven together more completely. I also noted that a handful of key scenes were played off-stage, and only referred to by the characters in passing, which seemed a bit odd to me.But, I suppose the primary problem I have with Pollyanna is the heroine herself. She's just TOO good, TOO sweet, TOO everlastingly charming and upbeat to be the least bit believable. Now, I wouldn't say that she is OFFENSIVELY good---unlike the horribly sanctimonious Elsie Dinsmore (a favourite Victorian child heroine), Pollyanna doesn't preach to the other characters or give the impression that she's morally superior to everyone else. But Pollyanna didn't come across as a natural little girl for me; she pales not only into insignificance, but into invisibility, in comparison to the marvellous Anne Shirley of the "Green Gables" books. In addition, I would say that Pollyanna's general naïveté might have a certain charm in a child half her age, but in a ten- or eleven-year-old character, it just seems a bit odd. I don't want to sound too mean-spirited, but you'd almost think that she has some sort of developmental disability. So, the portrayal of the main character is kind of a major drawback to the novel.Still, despite a somewhat mixed review, I'm going to recommend this story; I think at least some young people of today would enjoy it, though obviously it will probably have more appeal to young girls than to young boys. And if you have even a passing interest in vintage children's literature, this book should be read at least once, as it's been so iconic in the field of American juvenile lit. I'll give it four stars, with the high rating due in part to the nostalgia factor, since I did enjoy this very much when I was young.(You know, from my youthful reading I remember Aunt Polly as being very old in this book---so imagine my surprise to learn that the character is actually five years younger than I am at present. Man, I am so totally depressed now...)This book has been published in many varying editions over the years (including an abridged paperback version for the school market, sold by Scholastic). The copy I've just read is the same one that I had as a child, published by The Page Company in 1914. It really is a lovely edition, and I would recommend this particular version if you can find it. The boards are covered in a green patterned cloth that catches the light in different ways, depending on the angle you look at it. Tilt it one way and you'll see a diamond pattern of light fleur-de-lis on a dark background, tilt again and it's dark fleur-de-lis over stripes, tilt again and you'll mostly see just the stripes, tilt again and the light stripes turn dark and the dark stripes turn light----okay, okay---you get the idea I'm sure! Now, I know there must be a name for this sort of material---but I know almost nothing about fabric and so can't describe it using the correct terminology.This edition also has eight illustrations tipped in; full-page black-and-white paintings printed on glossy paper. This once again reminds me that it's a real shame so few juvenile titles contain pictures in the present day---these are quite nice.more
Although I've heard many references to people being too "Pollyanne-ish" I had never actually read the book - and I have to say that Pollyanna gets a bad rap. If more of us had the habit of finding things to be grateful for, we'd find that we were happier - even in the face of terrible troubles. Pollyanna didn't deny that things were bad - she just didn't dwell on them and she tried to look for the best in everyone and in all situations. The story is an old-fashioned one, but is enjoyable even so - and there's even a little romance at the end!more
Although I've heard many references to people being too "Pollyanne-ish" I had never actually read the book - and I have to say that Pollyanna gets a bad rap. If more of us had the habit of finding things to be grateful for, we'd find that we were happier - even in the face of terrible troubles. Pollyanna didn't deny that things were bad - she just didn't dwell on them and she tried to look for the best in everyone and in all situations. The story is an old-fashioned one, but is enjoyable even so - and there's even a little romance at the end!more
This was another of my favourites as a child. Well worth giving to your kids to read.Hardcover. Reserved for the xmas fair.more
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Reviews

Originally published in 1913, this tale of a young orphan girl who comes to live with her aunt in a small Vermont town, transforming everyone she meets with her "glad game," is one of those classic stories featuring a hero or heroine whose name has become a byword for a particular quality or idea. Just as we speak of someone who refuses to act maturely as having a "Peter Pan complex," or describe a rags-to-riches transformation as a "Cinderella story," so too do we refer to someone with a tendency toward optimism as a "Pollyanna." Before we had an entire industry of self-help gurus advising us of the power of positive thinking, we had Eleanor H. Porter's Pollyanna, which follows the story of the eponymous Pollyanna Whittier, and her "overwhelming, unquenchable gladness for everything that has ever happened or is going to happen."Arriving in Beldingsville, Vermont from the western prairie, where her missionary father has just recently died, Pollyanna eagerly anticipates living with her Aunt Polly Harrington, for whom she is (partially) named. Although her reception is far from ideal - stern Aunt Polly looks upon her young niece as a duty, rather than a joyful addition to her well-to-do household - she perseveres in looking on the bright side of matters, viewing punishments as rewards, and laughing off many of the cold rebuffs she receives. Finding friendship elsewhere, Pollyanna teaches everyone in town, from the Harrington housemaid, Nancy, to reclusive neighbor John Pendleton, how to play the "game" - in which the player looks for something to be glad about in every occurrence in their lives - taught to her by her father as a young girl. When Pollyanna is struck by an automobile, and loses the use of her legs, the "glad girl" suddenly finds that she can no longer play the game, and that it is she who needs a little cheering up.Chosen as our February selection over in The L.M. Montgomery Book Club to which I belong, where we sometimes like to read book that are "in the spirit" of L.M. Montgomery, Pollyanna is one of those classics of which I have long been aware, but which I have never happened to pick up. Being familiar with the general story, I have always associated it in my mind with the kind of orphan narrative to be found in books like Anne of Green Gables, or Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm. I'm very glad it was chosen by the club, as this has given me the push I needed to finally read it, thereby confirming my impression of it as being akin to L.M. Montgomery and Kate Douglas Wiggin's work. That said, although I found it readable enough (I got through most of it in one sitting), it wasn't quite as appealing as I'd expected it to be, and I thought that the charm sometimes wore a little thin. I appreciate the message of trying to find the good around us, but discovered that Pollyanna was just a little too positive for my taste - so positive that I started to become irritated with her. There was a point, midway through the book, when I felt that if I had to read one more scene involving Pollyanna laughing off something nasty, I would tear my hair out!I vacillated quite a bit between a two and three star rating with this one, trying to balance my irritation with the heroine, and my overall engagement in the story. I can't deny that I enjoyed reading Pollyanna, despite my irritation, so I rounded up. Of course, I'm not sure I enjoyed it enough to hunt down the sequels any time soon.more
Pollyanna (1913) by Eleanor H. Porter is now mainly read as a children's book, but is wasn't written or intended as such. It was an immediate bestseller and influenced many people and popular culture during the first quarter of the twentieth century.The story is about a young girl, who, as an orphan, is sent to live with her aunt, the stern Miss Polly. Pollyanna's father has taught her a game, which consists of always seeing things and situations in a positive light, and always being delighted with anything, in short, always be glad. The young, bright, innocent Polyanna spreads this belief, and starts influencing the people around her.Within a few months she has made friends with most people in the community, even people, such as Mr Pendleton, who was considered to be unapproachable. Her unlimited optimism cheers up all the people around her, and brings people together, who were separated through years of miserly sorrow and anguish.Underlying Polyanna's "glad game" lies the idea that everyone should be happy with small things. There are subtle suggestions that money is not the most important thing in life, and that apart from money there are many other things that may make people happy. The novel also suggests that Americans should care for each other before caring for others, far away, as there were still many poor and needy people within the US, at that time.To the modern reader the book may appear repetitive and very simple, probably why it is now seen as a children's book. Because of its young protagonist, and its message, the novel also seems aimed at children. However, it is likely that children will merely focus on the superficial and rather simplistic message about being happy with anything, while missing the more subtle criticism on a society which is increasingly ruled by money, turning people in miserly Scrooges, having a lot of money, but unable to find happiness in life.more
This was one of my childhood favourites and I was prepared to be disillusioned - I read What Katy Did last year and came away wondering why I had ever enjoyed something so apparently sanctimonious - but that didn't happen. I could see exactly why I had loved Pollyanna as a child and sat sniffing at the sad bits and wishing I has a tissue.For those that don't know the book, here goes. Incredibly happy young orphan girl Pollyanna goes to live with her bad-tempered spinster Aunt Polly in the early years of the twentieth century. Pollyanna's cheerfulness touches the heart of everyone she meets, changing lives and eventually melting the heart of the stone-faced Aunt Polly. Obviously there's more plot than that but that's it in a nutshell. Incredibly sentimental and I loved every minute of it.I have to say though that I can't imagine a modern child reading and enjoying it the way I did. Childhood's moved on too much. But I still loved it.more
This book is definitely a retread of themes that had already surfaced in children's literature like "Anne of Green Gables" and "Heidi:" a girl with an insufferably positive spirit brightens the world of the gloomy adults around her. However, in spite of the repetition throughout the book of that single theme, it is still an enjoyable read and probably strengthened by the author's willingness to permit tragedy to befall the main character, testing her resolve and creating a chance to show maturity and depth. There are a couple of secrets that are supposed to seem mysterious to some of the characters within the book, but that I at least figured out quite quickly. I don't remember whether the answers seemed that obvious when I was a child reading this book, but even if they did, the fact that you're in the know and proven right about your assumptions always feels a little bit good, and there is at least one red herring to throw a wrench in what otherwise might be a predictable plot. This is an appealing story for girls of all ages.more
Orphaned Pollyanna is a very bright and cheerful girl who are sent to live with her cold and reserved aunt. Throughout the novel she plays "the glad game" - always finding something positive in the most unhappy circumstances - and she befriends several persons and helps them while the aunt is kept completely in the dark. Her "glad game" comes to a difficult personal test in the last part of the story.It reminded me a lot both in story line and spirit of Heidi and Little Lord Fauntleroy - also both children who have a very innocent and gullible nature - thinking always the best of people. I liked this american Children's classic a lot. The audiobook was read by S. Patricia Bailey - with just the right innocent voice for Pollyanna.more
Pollyanna is that joyful book character that we never find in contemporary children’s literature. It was so refreshing to read this old story and revel in her ability to play the Glad Game, to find something good in any situation, and to see how this ability changed the lives of all who were around her. Pollyanna, to my surprise, was not the priggish, bamby-pamby, goody-goody-two-shoes I’d been led to believe she was. Instead she was a real girl who actually put into action the ideas of joy and service to others in her everyday life. A delightful read.more
Pollyanna is that joyful book character that we never find in contemporary children’s literature. It was so refreshing to read this old story and revel in her ability to play the Glad Game, to find something good in any situation, and to see how this ability changed the lives of all who were around her. Pollyanna, to my surprise, was not the priggish, bamby-pamby, goody-goody-two-shoes I’d been led to believe she was. Instead she was a real girl who actually put into action the ideas of joy and service to others in her everyday life. A delightful read.more
Unloved and unwanted, orphan Pollyanna Whittier boards an eastbound train to live with her Aunt Polly, a wealthy spinster. Aunt Polly treats the child insensitively, giving her a musty room in the attic and expecting her to keep quiet and stay out of the way. Pollyanna, with her optimistic outlook on life, turns all the lemons thrown her way into lemonade; punishments are viewed as rewards, unfriendly people in town are befriended. Pollyanna's "Glad Game" is soon played by all the people of the town. A terrible accident with a motor car as she is crossing the street finally breaks Pollyanna's spirit. When long-held secrets are finally revealed, even Aunt Polly comes around to warming up not only to her niece, but to a relationship she had long denied herself.more
Unloved and unwanted, orphan Pollyanna Whittier boards an eastbound train to live with her Aunt Polly, a wealthy spinster. Aunt Polly treats the child insensitively, giving her a musty room in the attic and expecting her to keep quiet and stay out of the way. Pollyanna, with her optimistic outlook on life, turns all the lemons thrown her way into lemonade; punishments are viewed as rewards, unfriendly people in town are befriended. Pollyanna's "Glad Game" is soon played by all the people of the town. A terrible accident with a motor car as she is crossing the street finally breaks Pollyanna's spirit. When long-held secrets are finally revealed, even Aunt Polly comes around to warming up not only to her niece, but to a relationship she had long denied herself.more
There are many classics that I did not read as a child. Treasure Island, Frankenstein, Robinson Crusoe, Around the World in 80 Days, and Little Women are but a few.However, I vow to systematically read these treasures in the next few months. Today I read Pollyanna.Published in 1913, this gem stands the test of time. It is delightfully sappy, corny and wonderfully filled with old fashioned fun.Pollyanna is an orphan whose father left her with the wonderful gift of optimism and the ability to find something to be glad about even in the most difficult situations.When chatty, gregarious Pollyanna is taken in by her stern, hardened Aunt Polly, magic occurs. Not only is Aunt Polly changed, but the entire town is transformed as well.If you haven't read this classic, I recommend you do so! Grab a pair of rose colored glasses, a cup of sugared hot chocolate, a sprinkling of holiday cheer and be prepared to smile.more
There are many classics that I did not read as a child. Treasure Island, Frankenstein, Robinson Crusoe, Around the World in 80 Days, and Little Women are but a few.However, I vow to systematically read these treasures in the next few months. Today I read Pollyanna.Published in 1913, this gem stands the test of time. It is delightfully sappy, corny and wonderfully filled with old fashioned fun.Pollyanna is an orphan whose father left her with the wonderful gift of optimism and the ability to find something to be glad about even in the most difficult situations.When chatty, gregarious Pollyanna is taken in by her stern, hardened Aunt Polly, magic occurs. Not only is Aunt Polly changed, but the entire town is transformed as well.If you haven't read this classic, I recommend you do so! Grab a pair of rose colored glasses, a cup of sugared hot chocolate, a sprinkling of holiday cheer and be prepared to smile.more
I remember reading the Golden Books version of this story as a kid, and wanted to read the novel now given it's status as a classic. I was pleased to find that although the language has dated, the moral of the story is still very valid in today's society (usually the case in a classic). Pollyanna was an easy and uplifting read, and I would recommend it to anyone wanting a break from reading heavy crime novels, and who need a little 'sunlight' between the pages.more
I remember reading the Golden Books version of this story as a kid, and wanted to read the novel now given it's status as a classic. I was pleased to find that although the language has dated, the moral of the story is still very valid in today's society (usually the case in a classic). Pollyanna was an easy and uplifting read, and I would recommend it to anyone wanting a break from reading heavy crime novels, and who need a little 'sunlight' between the pages.more
I've just finished a re-read of Eleanor Porter's "Pollyanna," which apparently I had read a number of times when I was younger, because I remembered every single little aspect of the plot. I suppose many people already have at least a passing familiarity with this tale, which was first published in 1912 and has been reprinted many times since then, as well as having been adapted for the screen on numerous occasions.I confess, I was surprised at how well this story held up when read through adult eyes. Oh, it's rather sentimental, true enough, but perhaps I'm not as jaded as I would like to think I am because some of the sentimental/emotional passages totally did a number on me!Obviously this book has staying power, though the nearly dozen sequels that followed (written by a number of various authors) have long since faded from the public's memory. To the best of my recollection, the first Pollyanna book is far superior to those that followed, but I still wouldn't call it perfect. The "plucky orphan" character has long been a staple of children's literature and has appeared in many guises throughout the years, but immediately after I started reading the book I got a very strong "Anne of Green Gables" vibe, "Anne" having been published four years previously to the first printing of this story. This feeling of déjà vu continued on and off throughout the novel, and I couldn't help but wonder if Porter was influenced by Maud Montgomery's work.Despite a number of interesting little sub-plots, the narrative of Pollyanna is rather loose and episodic, and I think I would have liked to see all the story elements woven together more completely. I also noted that a handful of key scenes were played off-stage, and only referred to by the characters in passing, which seemed a bit odd to me.But, I suppose the primary problem I have with Pollyanna is the heroine herself. She's just TOO good, TOO sweet, TOO everlastingly charming and upbeat to be the least bit believable. Now, I wouldn't say that she is OFFENSIVELY good---unlike the horribly sanctimonious Elsie Dinsmore (a favourite Victorian child heroine), Pollyanna doesn't preach to the other characters or give the impression that she's morally superior to everyone else. But Pollyanna didn't come across as a natural little girl for me; she pales not only into insignificance, but into invisibility, in comparison to the marvellous Anne Shirley of the "Green Gables" books. In addition, I would say that Pollyanna's general naïveté might have a certain charm in a child half her age, but in a ten- or eleven-year-old character, it just seems a bit odd. I don't want to sound too mean-spirited, but you'd almost think that she has some sort of developmental disability. So, the portrayal of the main character is kind of a major drawback to the novel.Still, despite a somewhat mixed review, I'm going to recommend this story; I think at least some young people of today would enjoy it, though obviously it will probably have more appeal to young girls than to young boys. And if you have even a passing interest in vintage children's literature, this book should be read at least once, as it's been so iconic in the field of American juvenile lit. I'll give it four stars, with the high rating due in part to the nostalgia factor, since I did enjoy this very much when I was young.(You know, from my youthful reading I remember Aunt Polly as being very old in this book---so imagine my surprise to learn that the character is actually five years younger than I am at present. Man, I am so totally depressed now...)This book has been published in many varying editions over the years (including an abridged paperback version for the school market, sold by Scholastic). The copy I've just read is the same one that I had as a child, published by The Page Company in 1914. It really is a lovely edition, and I would recommend this particular version if you can find it. The boards are covered in a green patterned cloth that catches the light in different ways, depending on the angle you look at it. Tilt it one way and you'll see a diamond pattern of light fleur-de-lis on a dark background, tilt again and it's dark fleur-de-lis over stripes, tilt again and you'll mostly see just the stripes, tilt again and the light stripes turn dark and the dark stripes turn light----okay, okay---you get the idea I'm sure! Now, I know there must be a name for this sort of material---but I know almost nothing about fabric and so can't describe it using the correct terminology.This edition also has eight illustrations tipped in; full-page black-and-white paintings printed on glossy paper. This once again reminds me that it's a real shame so few juvenile titles contain pictures in the present day---these are quite nice.more
I've just finished a re-read of Eleanor Porter's "Pollyanna," which apparently I had read a number of times when I was younger, because I remembered every single little aspect of the plot. I suppose many people already have at least a passing familiarity with this tale, which was first published in 1912 and has been reprinted many times since then, as well as having been adapted for the screen on numerous occasions.I confess, I was surprised at how well this story held up when read through adult eyes. Oh, it's rather sentimental, true enough, but perhaps I'm not as jaded as I would like to think I am because some of the sentimental/emotional passages totally did a number on me!Obviously this book has staying power, though the nearly dozen sequels that followed (written by a number of various authors) have long since faded from the public's memory. To the best of my recollection, the first Pollyanna book is far superior to those that followed, but I still wouldn't call it perfect. The "plucky orphan" character has long been a staple of children's literature and has appeared in many guises throughout the years, but immediately after I started reading the book I got a very strong "Anne of Green Gables" vibe, "Anne" having been published four years previously to the first printing of this story. This feeling of déjà vu continued on and off throughout the novel, and I couldn't help but wonder if Porter was influenced by Maud Montgomery's work.Despite a number of interesting little sub-plots, the narrative of Pollyanna is rather loose and episodic, and I think I would have liked to see all the story elements woven together more completely. I also noted that a handful of key scenes were played off-stage, and only referred to by the characters in passing, which seemed a bit odd to me.But, I suppose the primary problem I have with Pollyanna is the heroine herself. She's just TOO good, TOO sweet, TOO everlastingly charming and upbeat to be the least bit believable. Now, I wouldn't say that she is OFFENSIVELY good---unlike the horribly sanctimonious Elsie Dinsmore (a favourite Victorian child heroine), Pollyanna doesn't preach to the other characters or give the impression that she's morally superior to everyone else. But Pollyanna didn't come across as a natural little girl for me; she pales not only into insignificance, but into invisibility, in comparison to the marvellous Anne Shirley of the "Green Gables" books. In addition, I would say that Pollyanna's general naïveté might have a certain charm in a child half her age, but in a ten- or eleven-year-old character, it just seems a bit odd. I don't want to sound too mean-spirited, but you'd almost think that she has some sort of developmental disability. So, the portrayal of the main character is kind of a major drawback to the novel.Still, despite a somewhat mixed review, I'm going to recommend this story; I think at least some young people of today would enjoy it, though obviously it will probably have more appeal to young girls than to young boys. And if you have even a passing interest in vintage children's literature, this book should be read at least once, as it's been so iconic in the field of American juvenile lit. I'll give it four stars, with the high rating due in part to the nostalgia factor, since I did enjoy this very much when I was young.(You know, from my youthful reading I remember Aunt Polly as being very old in this book---so imagine my surprise to learn that the character is actually five years younger than I am at present. Man, I am so totally depressed now...)This book has been published in many varying editions over the years (including an abridged paperback version for the school market, sold by Scholastic). The copy I've just read is the same one that I had as a child, published by The Page Company in 1914. It really is a lovely edition, and I would recommend this particular version if you can find it. The boards are covered in a green patterned cloth that catches the light in different ways, depending on the angle you look at it. Tilt it one way and you'll see a diamond pattern of light fleur-de-lis on a dark background, tilt again and it's dark fleur-de-lis over stripes, tilt again and you'll mostly see just the stripes, tilt again and the light stripes turn dark and the dark stripes turn light----okay, okay---you get the idea I'm sure! Now, I know there must be a name for this sort of material---but I know almost nothing about fabric and so can't describe it using the correct terminology.This edition also has eight illustrations tipped in; full-page black-and-white paintings printed on glossy paper. This once again reminds me that it's a real shame so few juvenile titles contain pictures in the present day---these are quite nice.more
Although I've heard many references to people being too "Pollyanne-ish" I had never actually read the book - and I have to say that Pollyanna gets a bad rap. If more of us had the habit of finding things to be grateful for, we'd find that we were happier - even in the face of terrible troubles. Pollyanna didn't deny that things were bad - she just didn't dwell on them and she tried to look for the best in everyone and in all situations. The story is an old-fashioned one, but is enjoyable even so - and there's even a little romance at the end!more
Although I've heard many references to people being too "Pollyanne-ish" I had never actually read the book - and I have to say that Pollyanna gets a bad rap. If more of us had the habit of finding things to be grateful for, we'd find that we were happier - even in the face of terrible troubles. Pollyanna didn't deny that things were bad - she just didn't dwell on them and she tried to look for the best in everyone and in all situations. The story is an old-fashioned one, but is enjoyable even so - and there's even a little romance at the end!more
This was another of my favourites as a child. Well worth giving to your kids to read.Hardcover. Reserved for the xmas fair.more
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