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In this classic adventure story, a wealthy gentleman, Phileas Fogg, makes a bet that he can travel around the world in eighty days. Fogg and his servant set off immediately, determined to win this race against time. Little do they know they aren't making the journey alone.... Fogg has been fingered as the culprit in a bank robbery, and a detective in hot pursuit is trailing them as they cross every continent.
Published: Aladdin on
ISBN: 9781442457959
List price: $6.99
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A literary standard if you want to judge a book by its enjoyment level as opposed to its "literary quality."more
A literary standard if you want to judge a book by its enjoyment level as opposed to its "literary quality."more
A literary standard if you want to judge a book by its enjoyment level as opposed to its "literary quality."more
I read the Project Gutenberg version of this, in the end: I don't know who translated it, but the translation was really quite nice. I enjoyed this book more than I expected to. For all that he bribes his way around the world, really, Phileas Fogg has some interesting adventures, including saving a lovely young woman and commandeering a ship. I thought the characters were all quite fun. There are stereotypes and so on, and it's very very biased toward all things English, seemingly, but knowing about that in advance, I could ignore it.

I loved the end a lot more than I expected to. I thought it was clever, and I enjoyed seeing a softer side of Phileas Fogg (one that I had, of course, been suspecting for a while).more
I read the Project Gutenberg version of this, in the end: I don't know who translated it, but the translation was really quite nice. I enjoyed this book more than I expected to. For all that he bribes his way around the world, really, Phileas Fogg has some interesting adventures, including saving a lovely young woman and commandeering a ship. I thought the characters were all quite fun. There are stereotypes and so on, and it's very very biased toward all things English, seemingly, but knowing about that in advance, I could ignore it.

I loved the end a lot more than I expected to. I thought it was clever, and I enjoyed seeing a softer side of Phileas Fogg (one that I had, of course, been suspecting for a while).more
Wonderful narrator and includes some music from the movie. There is 7 hours and 53 minutes of listening. Phileas Fogg is the main character who wages a bet with his friends from his club that he could go around the world in 80 days. The bet was a considerable fortune and considering the time period of the 1870's, it would be an almost impossible feat. Mr. Fogg, with his attention to precise detail had quiet confidence that he would be able to be back at his club at 8:45 pm in exactly 80 days. Along the way, a Scotland Yard policeman Mr. Fix, decides Mr. Fogg is in reality a thief and decides it is his duty to follow Mr. Fog and arrest him if he can. Is Phileas Fogg a thief? His character shows great courage and so the reader is left to find out if wealthy Mr. Fogg is a thief and if he will win his bet.Much better than the movie!!!!!!!more
Wonderful narrator and includes some music from the movie. There is 7 hours and 53 minutes of listening. Phileas Fogg is the main character who wages a bet with his friends from his club that he could go around the world in 80 days. The bet was a considerable fortune and considering the time period of the 1870's, it would be an almost impossible feat. Mr. Fogg, with his attention to precise detail had quiet confidence that he would be able to be back at his club at 8:45 pm in exactly 80 days. Along the way, a Scotland Yard policeman Mr. Fix, decides Mr. Fogg is in reality a thief and decides it is his duty to follow Mr. Fog and arrest him if he can. Is Phileas Fogg a thief? His character shows great courage and so the reader is left to find out if wealthy Mr. Fogg is a thief and if he will win his bet.Much better than the movie!!!!!!!more
As I recall this book was a lot of fun! Oddly enough I have yet to see either of the movies, but the original Mike Todd one is "in my queue." Because of my lack of interest in "hard science fiction" it's the only Jules Verne book I've read, but it appears he was a good storyteller based on that.more
As I recall this book was a lot of fun! Oddly enough I have yet to see either of the movies, but the original Mike Todd one is "in my queue." Because of my lack of interest in "hard science fiction" it's the only Jules Verne book I've read, but it appears he was a good storyteller based on that.more
I love Jules Verne. He's a ton of fun to read. The adventure stuff is fun, of course, but he also creates awesome characters. Nemo's probably his best-known, but the supremely phlegmatic Phineas Fogg of this book is nearly as memorable. His complete disinterest in exploring the places he passes through is sortof anathema to me, but maybe that's what makes him so fascinating; when I think of traveling around the world, it's with the purpose of seeing it, whereas he sees the entire thing simply as a series of obstacles to be overcome. It's remarkable in its pointlessness; at the end of the trip he has gained no money and experienced little of the cultures he's passed through. He made the trip solely to prove he could do it. (Sure, there's that one gain he seems pleased by at the end, but he hardly planned for that, so it has to be removed as a motive.)

The only thing I remembered about this story was that the climax involves a hot air balloon, which turns out not to be true. So that was a surprise.

ps phlegmatic is my new word. This book taught it to me. I'm gonna use it all the time. Sweet.more
I love Jules Verne. He's a ton of fun to read. The adventure stuff is fun, of course, but he also creates awesome characters. Nemo's probably his best-known, but the supremely phlegmatic Phineas Fogg of this book is nearly as memorable. His complete disinterest in exploring the places he passes through is sortof anathema to me, but maybe that's what makes him so fascinating; when I think of traveling around the world, it's with the purpose of seeing it, whereas he sees the entire thing simply as a series of obstacles to be overcome. It's remarkable in its pointlessness; at the end of the trip he has gained no money and experienced little of the cultures he's passed through. He made the trip solely to prove he could do it. (Sure, there's that one gain he seems pleased by at the end, but he hardly planned for that, so it has to be removed as a motive.)

The only thing I remembered about this story was that the climax involves a hot air balloon, which turns out not to be true. So that was a surprise.

ps phlegmatic is my new word. This book taught it to me. I'm gonna use it all the time. Sweet.more
So much fun! Phileas Fogg has definitely become one of my favorite characters of fiction ever, and Jules Verne proves to be far more interesting than I expected. I will definitely be looking into his other Voyages Extraordinaires.more
So much fun! Phileas Fogg has definitely become one of my favorite characters of fiction ever, and Jules Verne proves to be far more interesting than I expected. I will definitely be looking into his other Voyages Extraordinaires.more
Verne's tale of a 19th century Englishman's travels around the world is most notable for its depiction of local cultures now far gone. Often quaint, sometimes humorous and occasionally a bit too dated for the modern reader. Hardly a great work, but still a fun read.more
Verne's tale of a 19th century Englishman's travels around the world is most notable for its depiction of local cultures now far gone. Often quaint, sometimes humorous and occasionally a bit too dated for the modern reader. Hardly a great work, but still a fun read.more
I read this classic without actually knowing anything about it other than title and author. The adventure aspect was more or less what I expected, but the humor was quite unexpected, and much appreciated. Passepartout, and to a lesser degree Detective Fix, provide a constant stream of humor throughout the novel.Phileas Fogg has made a bet with the members of his "gentleman's club" that he can circumnavigate the world and be back in the club within 80 days. Setting off with his newly hired valet, Passepartout, he is followed by Detective Fix, who is certain that Mr Fogg has robbed the bank of England and is seeking escape.This is not a classic in the sense of having any profound themes, symbolism or hidden meanings. It is a light, humorous, fun adventure story, well told.(Minor spoiler note: Look at the many cover art options available in Library Thing. Many of them feature balloons... one of the few modes of transport never mentioned in the book at all! The cover that best illustrates the book is actually the Apple Classics children's version for Scholastic.)more
I read this classic without actually knowing anything about it other than title and author. The adventure aspect was more or less what I expected, but the humor was quite unexpected, and much appreciated. Passepartout, and to a lesser degree Detective Fix, provide a constant stream of humor throughout the novel.Phileas Fogg has made a bet with the members of his "gentleman's club" that he can circumnavigate the world and be back in the club within 80 days. Setting off with his newly hired valet, Passepartout, he is followed by Detective Fix, who is certain that Mr Fogg has robbed the bank of England and is seeking escape.This is not a classic in the sense of having any profound themes, symbolism or hidden meanings. It is a light, humorous, fun adventure story, well told.(Minor spoiler note: Look at the many cover art options available in Library Thing. Many of them feature balloons... one of the few modes of transport never mentioned in the book at all! The cover that best illustrates the book is actually the Apple Classics children's version for Scholastic.)more
I read this classic without actually knowing anything about it other than title and author. The adventure aspect was more or less what I expected, but the humor was quite unexpected, and much appreciated. Passepartout, and to a lesser degree Detective Fix, provide a constant stream of humor throughout the novel.Phileas Fogg has made a bet with the members of his "gentleman's club" that he can circumnavigate the world and be back in the club within 80 days. Setting off with his newly hired valet, Passepartout, he is followed by Detective Fix, who is certain that Mr Fogg has robbed the bank of England and is seeking escape.This is not a classic in the sense of having any profound themes, symbolism or hidden meanings. It is a light, humorous, fun adventure story, well told.(Minor spoiler note: Look at the many cover art options available in Library Thing. Many of them feature balloons... one of the few modes of transport never mentioned in the book at all! The cover that best illustrates the book is actually the Apple Classics children's version for Scholastic.)more
For some reason I had never before got round to reading this classic, nor seen any of the adaptations on screen, despite my enjoyment of other Verne works, especially 'Journey to the Centre of the Earth' which has resonated with me since childhood. I am glad now that I saved this pleasure to savour it all the more today.Like our hero, I was transported from start to finish of Phileas Fogg's incredible journey; before that, in fact, for his introduction by the author and his calm placing of a £20,000 wager against his friends in the Reform Club had me immediately engaged.Verne's adroit use of point of view is one example of his masterful skills as story-teller. He never permits the reader Fogg's internal perspective on a situation - instead telling the story partly authorially and partly though Passepartout or Fix, fellow-passengers with opposing views of the protagonist. As a result we never lose the sense of Fogg as an enigma (note his name), never have any advance notice of his planning, while his ability to extemporise solutions to overcome seemingly impossible barriers is our constant surprise and delight.Paradoxically, the less we know about him the more interesting and intriguing he becomes, and the stronger the bond we feel both for Fogg and those he protects. We can easily comprehend the hero-worship of Passepartout and the love interest of Aouda, for we share it.Fogg has few compeers in English literature that I can think of, though it strikes me that Ian Fleming may have had something of Fogg in mind when he created the generally imperturbable and resourceful James Bond. Verne's creation, though, for me is the greater hero, and the more memorable.more
For some reason I had never before got round to reading this classic, nor seen any of the adaptations on screen, despite my enjoyment of other Verne works, especially 'Journey to the Centre of the Earth' which has resonated with me since childhood. I am glad now that I saved this pleasure to savour it all the more today.Like our hero, I was transported from start to finish of Phileas Fogg's incredible journey; before that, in fact, for his introduction by the author and his calm placing of a £20,000 wager against his friends in the Reform Club had me immediately engaged.Verne's adroit use of point of view is one example of his masterful skills as story-teller. He never permits the reader Fogg's internal perspective on a situation - instead telling the story partly authorially and partly though Passepartout or Fix, fellow-passengers with opposing views of the protagonist. As a result we never lose the sense of Fogg as an enigma (note his name), never have any advance notice of his planning, while his ability to extemporise solutions to overcome seemingly impossible barriers is our constant surprise and delight.Paradoxically, the less we know about him the more interesting and intriguing he becomes, and the stronger the bond we feel both for Fogg and those he protects. We can easily comprehend the hero-worship of Passepartout and the love interest of Aouda, for we share it.Fogg has few compeers in English literature that I can think of, though it strikes me that Ian Fleming may have had something of Fogg in mind when he created the generally imperturbable and resourceful James Bond. Verne's creation, though, for me is the greater hero, and the more memorable.more
For some reason I had never before got round to reading this classic, nor seen any of the adaptations on screen, despite my enjoyment of other Verne works, especially 'Journey to the Centre of the Earth' which has resonated with me since childhood. I am glad now that I saved this pleasure to savour it all the more today.Like our hero, I was transported from start to finish of Phileas Fogg's incredible journey; before that, in fact, for his introduction by the author and his calm placing of a £20,000 wager against his friends in the Reform Club had me immediately engaged.Verne's adroit use of point of view is one example of his masterful skills as story-teller. He never permits the reader Fogg's internal perspective on a situation - instead telling the story partly authorially and partly though Passepartout or Fix, fellow-passengers with opposing views of the protagonist. As a result we never lose the sense of Fogg as an enigma (note his name), never have any advance notice of his planning, while his ability to extemporise solutions to overcome seemingly impossible barriers is our constant surprise and delight.Paradoxically, the less we know about him the more interesting and intriguing he becomes, and the stronger the bond we feel both for Fogg and those he protects. We can easily comprehend the hero-worship of Passepartout and the love interest of Aouda, for we share it.Fogg has few compeers in English literature that I can think of, though it strikes me that Ian Fleming may have had something of Fogg in mind when he created the generally imperturbable and resourceful James Bond. Verne's creation, though, for me is the greater hero, and the more memorable.more
This is a fun book filled with out-dated stereotypes, unlikely luck and a kick-ass ending. It should be required reading for travel students everywhere ;)more
This is a fun book filled with out-dated stereotypes, unlikely luck and a kick-ass ending. It should be required reading for travel students everywhere ;)more
The book "Around the World in 80 Days" by Jules Verne is a decent book. It is very slow in the beginning and has annoying old words. As the story progesses it gets a little better, but still not very good. The book is about a guy (Phileas Fogg) who bets he can make it around the world in 80 days. The book is just a boring account of the stuff he does. This book is very slow and boring and is not recommended to read unless you need to.more
The book "Around the World in 80 Days" by Jules Verne is a decent book. It is very slow in the beginning and has annoying old words. As the story progesses it gets a little better, but still not very good. The book is about a guy (Phileas Fogg) who bets he can make it around the world in 80 days. The book is just a boring account of the stuff he does. This book is very slow and boring and is not recommended to read unless you need to.more
The book "Around the World in 80 Days" by Jules Verne is a decent book. It is very slow in the beginning and has annoying old words. As the story progesses it gets a little better, but still not very good. The book is about a guy (Phileas Fogg) who bets he can make it around the world in 80 days. The book is just a boring account of the stuff he does. This book is very slow and boring and is not recommended to read unless you need to.more
For my Independent Reading Book Project, I read "Around the World in Eighty Days" by Jules Verne. The novel is about an English man named Phileas Fogg, his servant, Jean Passepartout, and their journey in hopes of circumnavigating the world in a mere eighty days. His motivation? Winning a bet of twenty-thousand pounds. Well, that and bragging rights. Immediately after the bet was made, Mr. Fogg and Passepartout depart the continent. In this very suspenseful plot line, the travelers jump from steamer to railway, all the while being trailed by a sneaky detective. With several twists and turns woven into the book, you are on edge from cover to cover. Moreover, in the back of your mind you are always thinking: Will they finish the journey in time?I appreciated how geographically educational this book was (although some chapters were a bit ‘school-syllabus’ type). In addition, there was always something arising—never a dull moment in this fast-paced book. Even though the character development was lacking, Verne wrote it in such a way that you felt as if you were tagging alongside the main characters, experiencing the great enterprise with them. Overall, this great read is a classic adventure story that has stood the test of time. If you want to have a laugh while reading a well-written book, "Around the World in Eighty Days" is for you!more
For my Independent Reading Book Project, I read "Around the World in Eighty Days" by Jules Verne. The novel is about an English man named Phileas Fogg, his servant, Jean Passepartout, and their journey in hopes of circumnavigating the world in a mere eighty days. His motivation? Winning a bet of twenty-thousand pounds. Well, that and bragging rights. Immediately after the bet was made, Mr. Fogg and Passepartout depart the continent. In this very suspenseful plot line, the travelers jump from steamer to railway, all the while being trailed by a sneaky detective. With several twists and turns woven into the book, you are on edge from cover to cover. Moreover, in the back of your mind you are always thinking: Will they finish the journey in time?I appreciated how geographically educational this book was (although some chapters were a bit ‘school-syllabus’ type). In addition, there was always something arising—never a dull moment in this fast-paced book. Even though the character development was lacking, Verne wrote it in such a way that you felt as if you were tagging alongside the main characters, experiencing the great enterprise with them. Overall, this great read is a classic adventure story that has stood the test of time. If you want to have a laugh while reading a well-written book, "Around the World in Eighty Days" is for you!more
“Around the World in 80 days” by Jules Verne is about the adventures of Mr. Fogg’s and his hired, French, hand Passepartout. After making a bet that he, Mr. Fogg, could make it around the world in 80 days he and Passepartout set out to win. I believe that Jules Verne wrote this book to show how anything is possible and even if something might seem ridiculous at first, things can turn out to be quite an adventure.In the book, Mr. Fogg is often ridiculed and questioned. He still keeps going and ends up saving and meeting Auoda, who he will later marry. Mr. Fogg brings joy because of his easiness and his courage to keep going, even though there were many challenges in his way. With his courage he is able to travel around the world in 80 days and do the unthinkable in that time.Another example would be at this part in the book were Mr. Fogg and Passepartout are charged with thievery. While Passepartout is freaking out, Mr. Fogg stays relax and bails them out. Staying calm and relaxed keeps them on their way and adds a new adventure to their trip. Through this all you’re just hoping that they will keep their heads and keep on their way so that they can arrive on time. The last example would be how at the beginning this bet and trip around the world in 80 days seemed ridiculous but later it brought them this new knowledge of the world and plenty new adventures. On just his belief and faith that they could make it around the world in 80 days made the whole trip possible because it brought fierceness into reaching their goal. In conclusion, this book brings a new idea of sticking to an idea and following it through because in the end you will gain new stories and memories. That is exactly what happens to Mr. Fogg and Passepartout, they stuck to this insane idea and in the end got a garden full of memories.more
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Reviews

A literary standard if you want to judge a book by its enjoyment level as opposed to its "literary quality."more
A literary standard if you want to judge a book by its enjoyment level as opposed to its "literary quality."more
A literary standard if you want to judge a book by its enjoyment level as opposed to its "literary quality."more
I read the Project Gutenberg version of this, in the end: I don't know who translated it, but the translation was really quite nice. I enjoyed this book more than I expected to. For all that he bribes his way around the world, really, Phileas Fogg has some interesting adventures, including saving a lovely young woman and commandeering a ship. I thought the characters were all quite fun. There are stereotypes and so on, and it's very very biased toward all things English, seemingly, but knowing about that in advance, I could ignore it.

I loved the end a lot more than I expected to. I thought it was clever, and I enjoyed seeing a softer side of Phileas Fogg (one that I had, of course, been suspecting for a while).more
I read the Project Gutenberg version of this, in the end: I don't know who translated it, but the translation was really quite nice. I enjoyed this book more than I expected to. For all that he bribes his way around the world, really, Phileas Fogg has some interesting adventures, including saving a lovely young woman and commandeering a ship. I thought the characters were all quite fun. There are stereotypes and so on, and it's very very biased toward all things English, seemingly, but knowing about that in advance, I could ignore it.

I loved the end a lot more than I expected to. I thought it was clever, and I enjoyed seeing a softer side of Phileas Fogg (one that I had, of course, been suspecting for a while).more
Wonderful narrator and includes some music from the movie. There is 7 hours and 53 minutes of listening. Phileas Fogg is the main character who wages a bet with his friends from his club that he could go around the world in 80 days. The bet was a considerable fortune and considering the time period of the 1870's, it would be an almost impossible feat. Mr. Fogg, with his attention to precise detail had quiet confidence that he would be able to be back at his club at 8:45 pm in exactly 80 days. Along the way, a Scotland Yard policeman Mr. Fix, decides Mr. Fogg is in reality a thief and decides it is his duty to follow Mr. Fog and arrest him if he can. Is Phileas Fogg a thief? His character shows great courage and so the reader is left to find out if wealthy Mr. Fogg is a thief and if he will win his bet.Much better than the movie!!!!!!!more
Wonderful narrator and includes some music from the movie. There is 7 hours and 53 minutes of listening. Phileas Fogg is the main character who wages a bet with his friends from his club that he could go around the world in 80 days. The bet was a considerable fortune and considering the time period of the 1870's, it would be an almost impossible feat. Mr. Fogg, with his attention to precise detail had quiet confidence that he would be able to be back at his club at 8:45 pm in exactly 80 days. Along the way, a Scotland Yard policeman Mr. Fix, decides Mr. Fogg is in reality a thief and decides it is his duty to follow Mr. Fog and arrest him if he can. Is Phileas Fogg a thief? His character shows great courage and so the reader is left to find out if wealthy Mr. Fogg is a thief and if he will win his bet.Much better than the movie!!!!!!!more
As I recall this book was a lot of fun! Oddly enough I have yet to see either of the movies, but the original Mike Todd one is "in my queue." Because of my lack of interest in "hard science fiction" it's the only Jules Verne book I've read, but it appears he was a good storyteller based on that.more
As I recall this book was a lot of fun! Oddly enough I have yet to see either of the movies, but the original Mike Todd one is "in my queue." Because of my lack of interest in "hard science fiction" it's the only Jules Verne book I've read, but it appears he was a good storyteller based on that.more
I love Jules Verne. He's a ton of fun to read. The adventure stuff is fun, of course, but he also creates awesome characters. Nemo's probably his best-known, but the supremely phlegmatic Phineas Fogg of this book is nearly as memorable. His complete disinterest in exploring the places he passes through is sortof anathema to me, but maybe that's what makes him so fascinating; when I think of traveling around the world, it's with the purpose of seeing it, whereas he sees the entire thing simply as a series of obstacles to be overcome. It's remarkable in its pointlessness; at the end of the trip he has gained no money and experienced little of the cultures he's passed through. He made the trip solely to prove he could do it. (Sure, there's that one gain he seems pleased by at the end, but he hardly planned for that, so it has to be removed as a motive.)

The only thing I remembered about this story was that the climax involves a hot air balloon, which turns out not to be true. So that was a surprise.

ps phlegmatic is my new word. This book taught it to me. I'm gonna use it all the time. Sweet.more
I love Jules Verne. He's a ton of fun to read. The adventure stuff is fun, of course, but he also creates awesome characters. Nemo's probably his best-known, but the supremely phlegmatic Phineas Fogg of this book is nearly as memorable. His complete disinterest in exploring the places he passes through is sortof anathema to me, but maybe that's what makes him so fascinating; when I think of traveling around the world, it's with the purpose of seeing it, whereas he sees the entire thing simply as a series of obstacles to be overcome. It's remarkable in its pointlessness; at the end of the trip he has gained no money and experienced little of the cultures he's passed through. He made the trip solely to prove he could do it. (Sure, there's that one gain he seems pleased by at the end, but he hardly planned for that, so it has to be removed as a motive.)

The only thing I remembered about this story was that the climax involves a hot air balloon, which turns out not to be true. So that was a surprise.

ps phlegmatic is my new word. This book taught it to me. I'm gonna use it all the time. Sweet.more
So much fun! Phileas Fogg has definitely become one of my favorite characters of fiction ever, and Jules Verne proves to be far more interesting than I expected. I will definitely be looking into his other Voyages Extraordinaires.more
So much fun! Phileas Fogg has definitely become one of my favorite characters of fiction ever, and Jules Verne proves to be far more interesting than I expected. I will definitely be looking into his other Voyages Extraordinaires.more
Verne's tale of a 19th century Englishman's travels around the world is most notable for its depiction of local cultures now far gone. Often quaint, sometimes humorous and occasionally a bit too dated for the modern reader. Hardly a great work, but still a fun read.more
Verne's tale of a 19th century Englishman's travels around the world is most notable for its depiction of local cultures now far gone. Often quaint, sometimes humorous and occasionally a bit too dated for the modern reader. Hardly a great work, but still a fun read.more
I read this classic without actually knowing anything about it other than title and author. The adventure aspect was more or less what I expected, but the humor was quite unexpected, and much appreciated. Passepartout, and to a lesser degree Detective Fix, provide a constant stream of humor throughout the novel.Phileas Fogg has made a bet with the members of his "gentleman's club" that he can circumnavigate the world and be back in the club within 80 days. Setting off with his newly hired valet, Passepartout, he is followed by Detective Fix, who is certain that Mr Fogg has robbed the bank of England and is seeking escape.This is not a classic in the sense of having any profound themes, symbolism or hidden meanings. It is a light, humorous, fun adventure story, well told.(Minor spoiler note: Look at the many cover art options available in Library Thing. Many of them feature balloons... one of the few modes of transport never mentioned in the book at all! The cover that best illustrates the book is actually the Apple Classics children's version for Scholastic.)more
I read this classic without actually knowing anything about it other than title and author. The adventure aspect was more or less what I expected, but the humor was quite unexpected, and much appreciated. Passepartout, and to a lesser degree Detective Fix, provide a constant stream of humor throughout the novel.Phileas Fogg has made a bet with the members of his "gentleman's club" that he can circumnavigate the world and be back in the club within 80 days. Setting off with his newly hired valet, Passepartout, he is followed by Detective Fix, who is certain that Mr Fogg has robbed the bank of England and is seeking escape.This is not a classic in the sense of having any profound themes, symbolism or hidden meanings. It is a light, humorous, fun adventure story, well told.(Minor spoiler note: Look at the many cover art options available in Library Thing. Many of them feature balloons... one of the few modes of transport never mentioned in the book at all! The cover that best illustrates the book is actually the Apple Classics children's version for Scholastic.)more
I read this classic without actually knowing anything about it other than title and author. The adventure aspect was more or less what I expected, but the humor was quite unexpected, and much appreciated. Passepartout, and to a lesser degree Detective Fix, provide a constant stream of humor throughout the novel.Phileas Fogg has made a bet with the members of his "gentleman's club" that he can circumnavigate the world and be back in the club within 80 days. Setting off with his newly hired valet, Passepartout, he is followed by Detective Fix, who is certain that Mr Fogg has robbed the bank of England and is seeking escape.This is not a classic in the sense of having any profound themes, symbolism or hidden meanings. It is a light, humorous, fun adventure story, well told.(Minor spoiler note: Look at the many cover art options available in Library Thing. Many of them feature balloons... one of the few modes of transport never mentioned in the book at all! The cover that best illustrates the book is actually the Apple Classics children's version for Scholastic.)more
For some reason I had never before got round to reading this classic, nor seen any of the adaptations on screen, despite my enjoyment of other Verne works, especially 'Journey to the Centre of the Earth' which has resonated with me since childhood. I am glad now that I saved this pleasure to savour it all the more today.Like our hero, I was transported from start to finish of Phileas Fogg's incredible journey; before that, in fact, for his introduction by the author and his calm placing of a £20,000 wager against his friends in the Reform Club had me immediately engaged.Verne's adroit use of point of view is one example of his masterful skills as story-teller. He never permits the reader Fogg's internal perspective on a situation - instead telling the story partly authorially and partly though Passepartout or Fix, fellow-passengers with opposing views of the protagonist. As a result we never lose the sense of Fogg as an enigma (note his name), never have any advance notice of his planning, while his ability to extemporise solutions to overcome seemingly impossible barriers is our constant surprise and delight.Paradoxically, the less we know about him the more interesting and intriguing he becomes, and the stronger the bond we feel both for Fogg and those he protects. We can easily comprehend the hero-worship of Passepartout and the love interest of Aouda, for we share it.Fogg has few compeers in English literature that I can think of, though it strikes me that Ian Fleming may have had something of Fogg in mind when he created the generally imperturbable and resourceful James Bond. Verne's creation, though, for me is the greater hero, and the more memorable.more
For some reason I had never before got round to reading this classic, nor seen any of the adaptations on screen, despite my enjoyment of other Verne works, especially 'Journey to the Centre of the Earth' which has resonated with me since childhood. I am glad now that I saved this pleasure to savour it all the more today.Like our hero, I was transported from start to finish of Phileas Fogg's incredible journey; before that, in fact, for his introduction by the author and his calm placing of a £20,000 wager against his friends in the Reform Club had me immediately engaged.Verne's adroit use of point of view is one example of his masterful skills as story-teller. He never permits the reader Fogg's internal perspective on a situation - instead telling the story partly authorially and partly though Passepartout or Fix, fellow-passengers with opposing views of the protagonist. As a result we never lose the sense of Fogg as an enigma (note his name), never have any advance notice of his planning, while his ability to extemporise solutions to overcome seemingly impossible barriers is our constant surprise and delight.Paradoxically, the less we know about him the more interesting and intriguing he becomes, and the stronger the bond we feel both for Fogg and those he protects. We can easily comprehend the hero-worship of Passepartout and the love interest of Aouda, for we share it.Fogg has few compeers in English literature that I can think of, though it strikes me that Ian Fleming may have had something of Fogg in mind when he created the generally imperturbable and resourceful James Bond. Verne's creation, though, for me is the greater hero, and the more memorable.more
For some reason I had never before got round to reading this classic, nor seen any of the adaptations on screen, despite my enjoyment of other Verne works, especially 'Journey to the Centre of the Earth' which has resonated with me since childhood. I am glad now that I saved this pleasure to savour it all the more today.Like our hero, I was transported from start to finish of Phileas Fogg's incredible journey; before that, in fact, for his introduction by the author and his calm placing of a £20,000 wager against his friends in the Reform Club had me immediately engaged.Verne's adroit use of point of view is one example of his masterful skills as story-teller. He never permits the reader Fogg's internal perspective on a situation - instead telling the story partly authorially and partly though Passepartout or Fix, fellow-passengers with opposing views of the protagonist. As a result we never lose the sense of Fogg as an enigma (note his name), never have any advance notice of his planning, while his ability to extemporise solutions to overcome seemingly impossible barriers is our constant surprise and delight.Paradoxically, the less we know about him the more interesting and intriguing he becomes, and the stronger the bond we feel both for Fogg and those he protects. We can easily comprehend the hero-worship of Passepartout and the love interest of Aouda, for we share it.Fogg has few compeers in English literature that I can think of, though it strikes me that Ian Fleming may have had something of Fogg in mind when he created the generally imperturbable and resourceful James Bond. Verne's creation, though, for me is the greater hero, and the more memorable.more
This is a fun book filled with out-dated stereotypes, unlikely luck and a kick-ass ending. It should be required reading for travel students everywhere ;)more
This is a fun book filled with out-dated stereotypes, unlikely luck and a kick-ass ending. It should be required reading for travel students everywhere ;)more
The book "Around the World in 80 Days" by Jules Verne is a decent book. It is very slow in the beginning and has annoying old words. As the story progesses it gets a little better, but still not very good. The book is about a guy (Phileas Fogg) who bets he can make it around the world in 80 days. The book is just a boring account of the stuff he does. This book is very slow and boring and is not recommended to read unless you need to.more
The book "Around the World in 80 Days" by Jules Verne is a decent book. It is very slow in the beginning and has annoying old words. As the story progesses it gets a little better, but still not very good. The book is about a guy (Phileas Fogg) who bets he can make it around the world in 80 days. The book is just a boring account of the stuff he does. This book is very slow and boring and is not recommended to read unless you need to.more
The book "Around the World in 80 Days" by Jules Verne is a decent book. It is very slow in the beginning and has annoying old words. As the story progesses it gets a little better, but still not very good. The book is about a guy (Phileas Fogg) who bets he can make it around the world in 80 days. The book is just a boring account of the stuff he does. This book is very slow and boring and is not recommended to read unless you need to.more
For my Independent Reading Book Project, I read "Around the World in Eighty Days" by Jules Verne. The novel is about an English man named Phileas Fogg, his servant, Jean Passepartout, and their journey in hopes of circumnavigating the world in a mere eighty days. His motivation? Winning a bet of twenty-thousand pounds. Well, that and bragging rights. Immediately after the bet was made, Mr. Fogg and Passepartout depart the continent. In this very suspenseful plot line, the travelers jump from steamer to railway, all the while being trailed by a sneaky detective. With several twists and turns woven into the book, you are on edge from cover to cover. Moreover, in the back of your mind you are always thinking: Will they finish the journey in time?I appreciated how geographically educational this book was (although some chapters were a bit ‘school-syllabus’ type). In addition, there was always something arising—never a dull moment in this fast-paced book. Even though the character development was lacking, Verne wrote it in such a way that you felt as if you were tagging alongside the main characters, experiencing the great enterprise with them. Overall, this great read is a classic adventure story that has stood the test of time. If you want to have a laugh while reading a well-written book, "Around the World in Eighty Days" is for you!more
For my Independent Reading Book Project, I read "Around the World in Eighty Days" by Jules Verne. The novel is about an English man named Phileas Fogg, his servant, Jean Passepartout, and their journey in hopes of circumnavigating the world in a mere eighty days. His motivation? Winning a bet of twenty-thousand pounds. Well, that and bragging rights. Immediately after the bet was made, Mr. Fogg and Passepartout depart the continent. In this very suspenseful plot line, the travelers jump from steamer to railway, all the while being trailed by a sneaky detective. With several twists and turns woven into the book, you are on edge from cover to cover. Moreover, in the back of your mind you are always thinking: Will they finish the journey in time?I appreciated how geographically educational this book was (although some chapters were a bit ‘school-syllabus’ type). In addition, there was always something arising—never a dull moment in this fast-paced book. Even though the character development was lacking, Verne wrote it in such a way that you felt as if you were tagging alongside the main characters, experiencing the great enterprise with them. Overall, this great read is a classic adventure story that has stood the test of time. If you want to have a laugh while reading a well-written book, "Around the World in Eighty Days" is for you!more
“Around the World in 80 days” by Jules Verne is about the adventures of Mr. Fogg’s and his hired, French, hand Passepartout. After making a bet that he, Mr. Fogg, could make it around the world in 80 days he and Passepartout set out to win. I believe that Jules Verne wrote this book to show how anything is possible and even if something might seem ridiculous at first, things can turn out to be quite an adventure.In the book, Mr. Fogg is often ridiculed and questioned. He still keeps going and ends up saving and meeting Auoda, who he will later marry. Mr. Fogg brings joy because of his easiness and his courage to keep going, even though there were many challenges in his way. With his courage he is able to travel around the world in 80 days and do the unthinkable in that time.Another example would be at this part in the book were Mr. Fogg and Passepartout are charged with thievery. While Passepartout is freaking out, Mr. Fogg stays relax and bails them out. Staying calm and relaxed keeps them on their way and adds a new adventure to their trip. Through this all you’re just hoping that they will keep their heads and keep on their way so that they can arrive on time. The last example would be how at the beginning this bet and trip around the world in 80 days seemed ridiculous but later it brought them this new knowledge of the world and plenty new adventures. On just his belief and faith that they could make it around the world in 80 days made the whole trip possible because it brought fierceness into reaching their goal. In conclusion, this book brings a new idea of sticking to an idea and following it through because in the end you will gain new stories and memories. That is exactly what happens to Mr. Fogg and Passepartout, they stuck to this insane idea and in the end got a garden full of memories.more
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