Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
The character of Peter Pan first came to life in the stories J. M. Barrie told to five brothers -- three of whom were named Peter, John, and Michael. Peter Pan is considered one of the greatest children's stories of all time and continues to charm readers one hundred years after its first appearance as a play in 1904.

Topics: Folk and Fairy Tales, Pirates, Fairies, Childhood, Magic, Family, Orphans, Dark, Adventurous, Heartfelt, 1910s, London, Island, Illustrated, and Speculative Fiction

Published: Aladdin on Feb 14, 2012
ISBN: 9781442457713
List price: $6.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Peter Pan
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

A good old-fashioned fairy tale, perfect to help one "get away" from real life. And since Barrie's writing is so much more fanciful and creative than any movie could imitate, too, reading the book is more than worth it even if you know the story through and through. I'd like to have this on my shelf once I have kids...read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This copy is really beautifully done, the pictures are really beautiful. As far as the story, does it really need a review?read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Man, I do not remember Barrie/Narrator being as angry and hateful during the end when I first read it. Issues.Way more fun than any version based on it, pretty much. More violent, more histrionic, more like children in general. We are simply beasts when we're young and I swear only folks from the that whole UK area are spiteful enough to capture that.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

A good old-fashioned fairy tale, perfect to help one "get away" from real life. And since Barrie's writing is so much more fanciful and creative than any movie could imitate, too, reading the book is more than worth it even if you know the story through and through. I'd like to have this on my shelf once I have kids...
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This copy is really beautifully done, the pictures are really beautiful. As far as the story, does it really need a review?
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Man, I do not remember Barrie/Narrator being as angry and hateful during the end when I first read it. Issues.Way more fun than any version based on it, pretty much. More violent, more histrionic, more like children in general. We are simply beasts when we're young and I swear only folks from the that whole UK area are spiteful enough to capture that.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Peter Pan is about fighting and he lives in Neverland and he doesn't want to grow up. What does he do? He saves people, and he also fights people.Captain Hook is the captain of the pirate ship. Captain Hook is mean and scared sometimes. That's all I'm going to say about him.I want to talk about Wendy. She's nice. She's kind. And she also cries a lot. I want to talk about Tink now. Tink is very grumpy. She doesn't like Wendy, and she thinks she's better than everyone. The redskins, we don't talk much about them in the book. The redskins talk funny. And the redskins walk funny, and that's all I'm going to say about the redskins. Here's what I like about Peter Pan: I liked the part Mr. Darling sat in the dog house, and I also liked when Peter said, "No, no, I'll never grow up!." Here's another thing that I liked: when Captain Hook fell into the water.Here's what I didn't like: I didn't like the part where Tink and Peter Pan shut the windows so Wendy couldn't come back. by Naomi Fotenos (~age 5)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm not sure what I thought of this. It's the classic story of the boy who never grows up and his interactions with children who do. Peter is an interesting character. He is essentially inhuman, and, the story seems to say, he must be, since growth and change are essential to humanity. The Neverland he plays in is the embodiment of the collective childhood imagination, full of pirates and fairies, and with a fair dose of infantile racism in the form of highly stereotyped "redskins." On the one hand, there's a lot more going on here than just the childhood fantasy. There's a lot going on under the surface: social commentary (Hook went to Eton), Freudian sexuality (not as much of a stretch as you'd think), romance and love triangles, and the inevitable philosophy that gets involved when you contemplate who Peter is. On the other hand, the book seems to try really hard to ignore it's own more interesting themes. I wanted to like this book. I like the idea, I like a lot of the motifs, I like the exploration of memory and imagination, and I like the coming of age (or not) theme. In the end though, I didn't enjoy it much. Reading the actual book added less than I expected to my general understanding of the story (based largely on adaptations, I suppose), and I found the writing style irritatingly juvenile. The narration is given almost in the tone of one of the flighty, none-too-smart children in the story itself. Think Rudyard Kipling's style, but without any ridiculousness and about half as much whimsy. I didn't hate the book: I like the story, and the growing up part at the end did get to me, but I was hoping for more, and it just wasn't there.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Much deeper than the movies with serious meanings behind the silliness and fun. A classic and a must read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Load more
scribd