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Treasure Island: Since its publication in 1883, generations have enjoyed this captivating tale of young Jim Hawkins and Long John Silver, the pirate rogue. This adventure of all adventures embodies the search for romance and excitement for which every heart yearns.
Published: Aladdin on
ISBN: 9781442457584
List price: $6.99
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Grandly entertaining story of a a young man's acquistion of a treasure map and the ensuing treasure hunt. Not as engaging as it could have been due to the way the story is segmented, but still a great read I enjoyed very much.more
Bedtime reading for my son who really enjoyed it. I was surprised how different it is to the tv versions, and I enjoyed doing pirate impressions out loud! Good read.more
I liked this a lot -- very exciting. I think the first few times I only read the beginning few chapters, though.more
This was great, with a thrilling read by B.J. Harrison of the The Classic Tales podcast. I thought I had read this before, but I think that was just all the movies I have seen over the years. The actual book is so much more developed than I expected. I really need to check out more of these classic adventure stories.more
This vastly influential pirate novel, first published 1881 (but with its story set in the middle 1700s) is of course superb, warmly recommended for everyone.But first a warning on what *not* to expect from its pirates. With all the pop-glamour surrounding buccaneering today, it's a surprise to see how the pirates in Treasure Island are depicted. Dangerous & bloodthirsty, but also seemingly rotten & somewhat incapable, with the only benefit of the doubt befalling Long John Silver.There may be undertones & hidden messages, but at face value most of the demonstrated competence is on the side of the British Empire, with her apparently disciplined sailors, stern captains, effective gentry, & fearless magistrates. Not to mention the Union Jack flag, furiously pitted against the skull & crossbones Jolly Roger.Modern pirate stories, in which imperial Britain may come out less favourably, have many fans. But the more old-fashioned point of view in Treasure Island is precisely what makes it interesting to modern readers. It highlights the multiple myths surrounding this pioneering age of global navigation.Also, to grasp the mystique of the treasure, it helps to understand how outlandish it is. The treasure buried on the island is estimated at £700,000. This sum was at the time of the story vast almost beyond comprehension. A booty share of £100,000 placed at, say, 5% interest, would yield the annual income of £5,000, enough to compete with the (extremely select) truly wealthy gentry, even with parts of the aristocracy. In Jane Austen's regency novel Emma, the heroine's father has a fortune of £30,000, repeatedly pegging him as "rich", certainly the richest man in the area. Yet his income is merely £1,500 a year.Even £1,000 a year (an elite threshold already) gave you resources for a good house & a private carriage - with all the needed servants. This is exactly the sort of respectability that many of the book's pirates & misfits articulate so loudly. Repeatedly, almost hypnotically, they utter their ultimate fantasy: owning a carriage.This isn't mere greed. It's the longing for an existence redeemed.more
Rereading Treasure Island for the first time since adolescence, I was struck by how tightly plotted the story is, and also how much of the story I had missed as a young reader. Stevenson writes with what is surely deadpan humor - for example, an over-the-top passage where the Squire begs forgiveness from his mortally-wounded gamekeeper for having dragged him on a wild-goose chase for buried treasure, only to have the servant (1) reply that it wouldn't be proper for him to forgive his master, (2) forgive him, and (3) promptly die. When the young protagonist kills a pirate in self-defense, Stevenson wastes no time on the notion that a good character must throw up or feel paralyzed by the knowledge they have taken a life; instead he describes, coolly, the way the pirate sinks to the bottom of the crystal clear bay. The story moves at a steady clip, is totally unsentimental, and lets the protagonist drive all the main action of the story through his choices, wise and otherwise. This book has aged well.more
Treasure Island stands out as a classic of young adventure fiction for good reason. Robert Louis Stevenson’s tale has survived the test of time because it is fast paced enough for the modern reader, packed with action and heroism that the young readily take to, and populated mostly with characters who leave little doubt about whose side they’re on. I say mostly, because one exception added a new element to this type of adventure fiction in the 1880’s—moral ambiguity. But more about that below.I recently revisited Stevenson’s young hero, Jim Hawkins, because his tale is one of the most read of all time. And it has gone on to become a story to be savored beyond the printed word. Without including the scads of TV serializations in many languages, at least seventeen movie versions of the story have been filmed since the first one in 1912.In case you’ve forgotten Jim, or were never aware of him in the first place, he is a 14 year-old who is helping his struggling parents run a quiet country inn when events overtake him. The inn is chosen as a hideaway by a frightening sailor with a dark secret. The sailor, Billy Bones, stays on long after his money runs out because Jim’s parents are too intimidated to send the man packing. Eventually, several rogues Bones has double crossed catch up to him. In the turmoil that follows, Jim’s father dies, his mother loses the inn, and Jim comes away with a treasure map.It’s here that the real adventure starts when the second most famous character from the book, Long John Silver, joins the crew that sets out on the voyage to recover the treasure. Silver is the model for all the later fiction pirates with parrots on their shoulders and peg-legs. The plotting begins soon after the ship hoists anchor, but the actual skullduggery doesn’t begin in earnest until arrival at the destination, the tropical Caribbean island marked on Jim’s map. There the two sides become clear. They become even clearer at the actual site of the X marked on the map.Jim sees what needs to be done to save his friends and confronts the various pirate mutineers several times. Because Jim’s companions are unaware that he is responding to the threats he uncovers, they come to question his reliability and loyalty. However, it is Jim’s brave actions that more than once allow his friends to stay half a step ahead of the pirates.Jim proves himself when he is captured by the pirates and puts his word and honor above his own safety. His actions eventually redeem him in the eyes of his friends and set him free, but only after he learns everything is not always black and white in the adult world. This is where the moral ambiguity comes in because Jim accepts help from the dubious character alluded to in the opening paragraph. I am speaking of Long John Silver, of course.more
As noted by a prior reviewer, Stevenson's classic adventure tale was clearly written for young people. However, the book goes no further. Its simplistic characters and lack of depth or story line will leave the adult reader wanting more. Personally, I thought the book was unimpressive. Read Stevenson's Doctor Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde instead.more
Treasure Island, a classic young adult adventure novel by Robert Louis Stevenson, is largely deserving of its fame. Although the plot is fundamentally simple, it's tightly written and manages to include a couple small, unexpected twists. Surprisingly, the characters are one of the book's strengths: while none of them are terribly deep, they are all rendered with such color and personality that you get to know them (and like or dislike them) by the end of the book. Treasure Island is also unlike many modern novels in its combination of brevity and completeness: it successfully includes the entirety of a satisfying tale in a single, fairly slim book.Treasure Island tells of a turning point in the life of Jim Hawkins, a young, British teenager in the 1760s or 1770s. Partially by happenstance and partially through his own thoughtless actions, he uncovers a treasure map and becomes cabin boy on a voyage to recover gold buried on a remote island by the infamous pirate Captain Flint.Stevenson's writing doesn't give you a look inside Jim's head, so we only get to know him through his words and actions. Thus, the reader only comes to the gradual realization that Jim is a surprisingly dumb and foolish protagonist. Early on, it is evident that he has an excess of bravery. But apart from that, as scene follows scene, Jim repeatedly exhibits a certain naivete about the world that is not cured by his repeated realizations that he has erred. This may or may not be realistic- it's hard for me to say- but it's certainly not common for novel protagonists, who tend to be of above-average intelligence.We also get to know the other characters through their words and actions. Jim seldom passes judgment on any of the characters- and when he does, you have no confidence whatsoever in his feelings- leaving you to decide what you think of men like Squire Trelawney, Doctor Livesey, and above all, Long John Silver.Long John Silver is the star of the book- more complex, colorful, and just plain fun-to-read-about than any other character. Getting to know him is an important part of the book, so I won't say more about him here.The book does have flaws. It lacks any female or minority characters or viewpoints. The protagonist isn't particularly appealing, nor is he a good role model. The story leaves a glaring loose end (Trelawney's failure to keep the island's latitude and longitude a secret), the consequences of which I was waiting for throughout the entire book. And lastly, the simplicity of the tale precludes any particularly brilliant or impactful scenes or lessons. In short, the book doesn't attain greatness. But it's pretty good, and it achieves what it attempts to achieve.more
Re-reading this was an absolute pleasure from the first sentence to the last. Or to be precise, listening the audiobook with outstanding narration by Alfred Molina.Long John Silver is one of the extraordinary characters of literature, at times he almost feels on par with the creations of Shakespeare and Dickens. His extraordinary physical and psychological aptitude, his ambiguous amorality, and the way in which he controls from a position of servitude. The narrator, Jim Hawkins, and his group are more cookie cutter cardboard romantic heroes, but still interesting and compelling. And many of the characters with walk on parts, like Billy Bones and the blind pirate Pew, are fascinating.The plot moves along briskly, although the terrors are considerably greater in the first quarter--before the mutineers declare themselves--and toward the end when Jim ends up back with the pirates. In between is a decent amount of fighting and straight up adventure, which is well told and interesting but hardly something that on its own would stand the test of time.Occasionally all of the pirate talk feels a little oppressive and cliched, but then you remind yourself that this is the novel that invented all of it. But mostly the language lends a strong scent of salty reality to this classic boys adventure novel.more
A copy of this text is in my personal library. Actually in a junior high theatre class I'm teaching they are reading the musical version of this text. I wanted to read it to see the way it compared to the script. The reason I gave it three stars is I believe certain portions of this text contained words and phrases students would struggle comprehending. I wouldn't make it a class wide assignment, reading the book independently, but rather read it as a whole class. I would love to use this book as a read aloud and then select a scene from the play to act out. I think it would work well for readers theatre.more
Classic tale of Pirates and TreasureA pirate from Captain Flint’s ship who has Flint's treasure map stays at the Admiral Benbow Inn and when he dies Jim Hawkins (who becomes the cabin boy) finds the map and so begins the adventure. Sadly I’d never read this classic before although have seen a variety of adaptations. It’s a rollicking adventure tale that has had a massive impact on what we all think of when we think of pirates. Treasure maps marked with an X, parrots saying “pieces of eight”, 1 legged pirates (Long John Silver), the black spot etc etc. Although the language is a little dated it really doesn’t make the story any less readable.Overall – If your at all interested in pirates I think this is a must read!more
Title: Treasure IslandAuthor: Robert Louis StevensonRelease Date: February 25, 2006 [EBook #120][Last Updated: November 10, 2010]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ASCIIPROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK TREASURE ISLAND Produced by Judy Boss, John Hamm and David Widgermore
this book is not a book for me not enough action and just boringmore
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson was an excellent book that I enjoyed reading. I like adventures and have not read a lot of pirate stories but this was one that I liked. I could see this story being well perceived by young and old as well. I would recommend this to be read by others.more
Never having been a fan of the pirate genre I entered communication with Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island, one of its pillars, with some trepidation especially since as the author’s biographer Claire Harmon notes like his Jekyl and Hyde, it’s so well known that it hardly requires being read at all, “Long John Silver is more real to most people than any historical buccaneer.” I’d like to offer a narrative of rediscovering the genre, but young Jim Hawkins is such a greedy, repellent narrator and the various pirates so difficult to understand and the story points so subtly telegraphed, I was less thrilled than appalled. That Silver and Gunn are the most entertaining figures it does go without saying, but as Harmon hints because their old bones have been resurrected so many times since, the original now seems prosaic and slothful. But such things are not Stevenson’s fault, of course.more
Wow! This is the first time I experience a novel on audio. My reading experience was magnified, the story seemed more alive and personal. I don't know why I waited so long to hear a novel on audio. I will definitely give my future students the choice of enjoying stories this way too. I didn't care too much about the plot of the story and the words were a bit complicated for me, but I really enjoyed many of the character traits. I gets pirate stories have never appealed to me.more
I endeavored to read Treasure Island as an entry point into a chronological approach to adventure stories, golden-age science fiction, and later speculative ventures. It seems to me that this classic novel has done well to satisfy in that role, and I will also add that the Oxford World's Classics introduction, explanatory notes, and other supplements were useful, if unessential.That said, I am afraid there is little to recommend Treasure Island to the modern reader. The story itself has been surpassed many times over, and the archaic maritime language is a double-edged sword of charm and impediment; the writing is fun and quotable for the same reasons that often render it a right chore to comprehend. If one's sole purpose in selecting Stevenson's tale of the stalwart Hispaniola crew's quest for buried booty amid the treachery of Long John Silver upon Skeleton Island is merely to be entertained by a hardy lads' romp, it must be said that many superior (and less frustrating) options have become available since it was published in 1883. You and I are simply too removed from this work by time to enjoy it properly.However, I am ultimately glad that I read Treasure Island. Its historical value is clear both as a genre pioneer and as the origin for so many well-known pirate tropes, and, although it can be difficult in the telling, to be sure, the tale is not an unpleasant one.more
I thought this book was pretty neat. I read a super old edition my dad had when he was in school. It totally made me want to watch Muppet treasure island, one of my favorite movies growing up. After reading the book i am better able to appreciate some of the humor in the movie, like "you killed dead tom" and the talking crab that is supposed to be the parrot captain flint.more
This is a fun adventure book, and introduced all our pirate stereotypes. For adults, its a good lighthearted jaunt, for younger reader it would be very exciting. Hidden treasure, pirates, the sea..what's not to like?more
A rollicking adventure story, a coming of age, a swashbuckling sea-tale, a boy's book. I read this to my son over many nights before bed, and while I feared the violence would frighten him and cause nightmares, it did not; but it did hold his attention and get him talking and thinking (and drawing treasure maps). What fun!more
I know this is a classic and a must read for all children, but I'd never read it until now. The book stars Jim Hawkins, son of an inn keeper, who acquires a treasure map and sets out to find his fortune. Along the way he teams up with various characters, including Dr Livesey, Long John Silver and Ben Gunn. There are lots of twists and turns to keep you guessing what will happen next. Of course the ending is predictable (they get the treasure) but it's what happens along the way that makes this a great children's adventure. In my book the level of violence makes it unsuitable for reading to younger children, best wait until they are old enough to read it themselves.more
I read Kidnapped in 2010 and quite liked it, so I figured I’d give Treasure Island a go. Now I’m reflecting on whether perhaps Kidnapped was a book I enjoyed because it provided me with entertainment at a time when I didn’t have much else to do.Treasure Island is the classic pirate story, a book that spawned thousands of imitators and almost single-handedly created a genre. Young Jim Hawkins, the poor son of innkeepers, is swept up into excitement and adventure after one of his lodgers entrusts him with a treasure map before dying. Jim promptly takes the map to Dr. Livesey, local magistrate and gentleman, and together they assemble an expedition to recover the treasure from the titular Caribbean Island. All doesn’t go to plan, of course, with the crew turning out to be half pirates, and upon arrival on Treasure Island all manner of mutinous hijinks break out in the scramble to seize the treasure.Treasure Island is a pirate story with 19th century mores, where the good guys are upstanding English gentlemen and the pirates are villainous scoundrels – unlike modern incarnations, where Johnny Depp is cast as a dashing and romantic figure of fun, the script neatly sidestepping the fact that pirates are bad people who do bad things. (I dearly love Mister Gibbs, but I expect he’s raped his fair share.) Treasure Island contains a good amount of betrayal, cold-blooded murder and terrible fates, and to his credit, Stevenson does not shy away from the fact that this is the sort of thing that can utterly ruin a boy’s fantasised adventure:Although the sun shone bright and hot, and the shore birds were fishing and crying all around us, and you would have thought anyone would be glad to get to land after so long at sea, my heart sank, as the saying is, into my boots, and from that first look onward I hated the very thought of Treasure Island.And although the book has what you’d technically call a happy ending, it finishes on a dark note, with Jim still haunted by what happened on the island.These good points aside, I can’t recommend Treasure Island, largely because I had trouble maintaining an interest in it. It starts out and finishes well enough, yet drags in the centre, as Jim’s crew hold out a stockade against the pirates. There’s far too much technical detail, a wholly unnecessary switch to Dr. Livesey as narrator, and it’s all just poorly paced. As the book goes on, far too much time is spent debating the loyalties and power struggles of the various crews, and the men within the crews, with overly-wrought dialogue. I also felt that Stevenson was treating the plot like a chess game, moving pieces here and there, and having certain characters do things which made no sense simply because it was necessary for the plot (Jim sneaking off and recovering the ship against all odds is the prime offender here.) Kidnapped, in comparison, contained a number of unexpected twists and turns which never felt out of place or contrived.Not a bad book, but not a good one either – certainly a disappointment compared to its reputation, and not as good as Stevenson’s less-famous Kidnapped.more
This is not the classic I was expecting. I can see the roots of adventure stories, all the original establishment of what have become pirate cliches, but I just wasn't grabbed for most of the story and I'm not sure why that is. Some of Jim Hawkin's actions were too reckless for me to believe and I never grew close to his character, but then I lack the 19th century sense of British forthrightness that might have made me think his decisions more rational. Long John Silver I did like and appreciate throughout, and I was disappointed that his story's ending lacked any sort of power; you can see how this has been corrected in any movie rendition. Among RLS' works, his Jekyl and Hyde remains my favourite.more
A classic. Pirates are bad people. Let me add to that. Glamorous evil is a problem in fiction. I say 'a problem' not because positive representation of wicked characters has bad effects (although doubtless it does), but because it is so false to fact as to be jarring, to break fictional tone. There are exceptions to this rule. Satan is glamorous, but he's an angel -- and as the first or second most powerful created being, of course he's going to have some pace on the ball. But in general, wickedness is not glamorous, or inventive, or interesting. It's a person who will kill a stranger for money, and then spend the money on trash -- as squalid, loathsome, and weak as a humanity gets. That's the type of person who becomes a pirate, in point of fact; that's who a pirate is. Simone Weil has a great quote to this effect: “Imaginary evil is romantic and varied; real evil is gloomy, monotonous, barren, boring. Imaginary good is boring; real good is always new, marvelous, intoxicating.” Stevenson invests his pirates with real evil, in Weil's sense, and it's the critical tone-setting choice in the novel....my name is Alexander Smollett, I've flown my sovereign's colours, and I'll see you all to Davy Jones. You can't find the treasure. You can't sail the ship—there's not a man among you fit to sail the ship. You can't fight us—Gray, there, got away from five of you. Your ship's in irons, Master Silver; you're on a lee shore, and so you'll find. I stand here and tell you so; and they're the last good words you'll get from me, for in the name of heaven, I'll put a bullet in your back when next I meet youmore
Young Jim Hawkins finds adventure when a "gentleman of fortune" stays at his father's inn, and the old pirate's compatriots come looking for him -- and a treasure map!Treasure Island is the quintessential adventure tale: a daring hero, a treasure, and dastardly pirates. I had a few false starts trying to read it as a kid, but I drowned in the antiquated language due to a book that's a hundred years old set in the 1700s. But when I was without power for several days, it was the perfect book to take me far and away from my circumstances. Partly because I knew much of the storyline (mostly, I am embarrassed to admit, through watching Muppet Treasure Island as a kid), partly because Jim is clearly narrating events that happened before, there was never any doubt that our English heroes would make it through unscathed, but this true blue adventure tale is certainly entertaining.more
A beautifully rendered and surprisingly complex and morally ambivalent adventure tale about magical (if horrid) places like Treasure Island. A great rendering of fantasy and so convincing about the heroic role that a young man can play that one might forgive the bosh about "God save the Queen," English patriotism, and true men.more
When people are amazed that the Harry Potter books are for kids but they are fun for any age, I giggle and think about this book; Ms. Rowling was not the first.more
Today is International Talk Like a Pirate Day and the perfect opportunity to review Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson. The narrator and young hero of the book, Jim Hawkins is a very likeable character and I can definitely understand why this book was so popular with boys; who wouldn't want to be young Jim? It was interesting to finally meet the characters of Captain Flint and Long John Silver and I enjoyed the pirate dialogue by thunder!I was somewhat surprised to find the plot a little more layered than I expected, being written for young boys. I can definitely imagine a young reader enjoying the adventure the first time through, but discovering and understanding more about the nature of men on the second read, perhaps several years later.I confess I feel a little late to the party - only reading Treasure Island in my 30s - but it's never too late to catch up on a classic. Having read it now, I can't rightly say what makes Treasure Island a classic though, or why it has endured. It was first published in 1883, but is still popular today.more
Treasure Island is perhaps THE classic pirate's tale. Robert Louis Stevenson, the author, created a rich story of adventure and treachery on the high seas all seen through the eyes of a boy named Jim Hawkins. Jim starts off as the son of tavern owners in a humble little port village. When an old seaman stays at the tavern, trouble soon follows him in the form of a pirate crew seeking revenge. I will not give away any more specific plot points, but events move forward to a great treasure hunt, treachery, and a surprisingly engaging story for adults as well as children.more
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Reviews

Grandly entertaining story of a a young man's acquistion of a treasure map and the ensuing treasure hunt. Not as engaging as it could have been due to the way the story is segmented, but still a great read I enjoyed very much.more
Bedtime reading for my son who really enjoyed it. I was surprised how different it is to the tv versions, and I enjoyed doing pirate impressions out loud! Good read.more
I liked this a lot -- very exciting. I think the first few times I only read the beginning few chapters, though.more
This was great, with a thrilling read by B.J. Harrison of the The Classic Tales podcast. I thought I had read this before, but I think that was just all the movies I have seen over the years. The actual book is so much more developed than I expected. I really need to check out more of these classic adventure stories.more
This vastly influential pirate novel, first published 1881 (but with its story set in the middle 1700s) is of course superb, warmly recommended for everyone.But first a warning on what *not* to expect from its pirates. With all the pop-glamour surrounding buccaneering today, it's a surprise to see how the pirates in Treasure Island are depicted. Dangerous & bloodthirsty, but also seemingly rotten & somewhat incapable, with the only benefit of the doubt befalling Long John Silver.There may be undertones & hidden messages, but at face value most of the demonstrated competence is on the side of the British Empire, with her apparently disciplined sailors, stern captains, effective gentry, & fearless magistrates. Not to mention the Union Jack flag, furiously pitted against the skull & crossbones Jolly Roger.Modern pirate stories, in which imperial Britain may come out less favourably, have many fans. But the more old-fashioned point of view in Treasure Island is precisely what makes it interesting to modern readers. It highlights the multiple myths surrounding this pioneering age of global navigation.Also, to grasp the mystique of the treasure, it helps to understand how outlandish it is. The treasure buried on the island is estimated at £700,000. This sum was at the time of the story vast almost beyond comprehension. A booty share of £100,000 placed at, say, 5% interest, would yield the annual income of £5,000, enough to compete with the (extremely select) truly wealthy gentry, even with parts of the aristocracy. In Jane Austen's regency novel Emma, the heroine's father has a fortune of £30,000, repeatedly pegging him as "rich", certainly the richest man in the area. Yet his income is merely £1,500 a year.Even £1,000 a year (an elite threshold already) gave you resources for a good house & a private carriage - with all the needed servants. This is exactly the sort of respectability that many of the book's pirates & misfits articulate so loudly. Repeatedly, almost hypnotically, they utter their ultimate fantasy: owning a carriage.This isn't mere greed. It's the longing for an existence redeemed.more
Rereading Treasure Island for the first time since adolescence, I was struck by how tightly plotted the story is, and also how much of the story I had missed as a young reader. Stevenson writes with what is surely deadpan humor - for example, an over-the-top passage where the Squire begs forgiveness from his mortally-wounded gamekeeper for having dragged him on a wild-goose chase for buried treasure, only to have the servant (1) reply that it wouldn't be proper for him to forgive his master, (2) forgive him, and (3) promptly die. When the young protagonist kills a pirate in self-defense, Stevenson wastes no time on the notion that a good character must throw up or feel paralyzed by the knowledge they have taken a life; instead he describes, coolly, the way the pirate sinks to the bottom of the crystal clear bay. The story moves at a steady clip, is totally unsentimental, and lets the protagonist drive all the main action of the story through his choices, wise and otherwise. This book has aged well.more
Treasure Island stands out as a classic of young adventure fiction for good reason. Robert Louis Stevenson’s tale has survived the test of time because it is fast paced enough for the modern reader, packed with action and heroism that the young readily take to, and populated mostly with characters who leave little doubt about whose side they’re on. I say mostly, because one exception added a new element to this type of adventure fiction in the 1880’s—moral ambiguity. But more about that below.I recently revisited Stevenson’s young hero, Jim Hawkins, because his tale is one of the most read of all time. And it has gone on to become a story to be savored beyond the printed word. Without including the scads of TV serializations in many languages, at least seventeen movie versions of the story have been filmed since the first one in 1912.In case you’ve forgotten Jim, or were never aware of him in the first place, he is a 14 year-old who is helping his struggling parents run a quiet country inn when events overtake him. The inn is chosen as a hideaway by a frightening sailor with a dark secret. The sailor, Billy Bones, stays on long after his money runs out because Jim’s parents are too intimidated to send the man packing. Eventually, several rogues Bones has double crossed catch up to him. In the turmoil that follows, Jim’s father dies, his mother loses the inn, and Jim comes away with a treasure map.It’s here that the real adventure starts when the second most famous character from the book, Long John Silver, joins the crew that sets out on the voyage to recover the treasure. Silver is the model for all the later fiction pirates with parrots on their shoulders and peg-legs. The plotting begins soon after the ship hoists anchor, but the actual skullduggery doesn’t begin in earnest until arrival at the destination, the tropical Caribbean island marked on Jim’s map. There the two sides become clear. They become even clearer at the actual site of the X marked on the map.Jim sees what needs to be done to save his friends and confronts the various pirate mutineers several times. Because Jim’s companions are unaware that he is responding to the threats he uncovers, they come to question his reliability and loyalty. However, it is Jim’s brave actions that more than once allow his friends to stay half a step ahead of the pirates.Jim proves himself when he is captured by the pirates and puts his word and honor above his own safety. His actions eventually redeem him in the eyes of his friends and set him free, but only after he learns everything is not always black and white in the adult world. This is where the moral ambiguity comes in because Jim accepts help from the dubious character alluded to in the opening paragraph. I am speaking of Long John Silver, of course.more
As noted by a prior reviewer, Stevenson's classic adventure tale was clearly written for young people. However, the book goes no further. Its simplistic characters and lack of depth or story line will leave the adult reader wanting more. Personally, I thought the book was unimpressive. Read Stevenson's Doctor Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde instead.more
Treasure Island, a classic young adult adventure novel by Robert Louis Stevenson, is largely deserving of its fame. Although the plot is fundamentally simple, it's tightly written and manages to include a couple small, unexpected twists. Surprisingly, the characters are one of the book's strengths: while none of them are terribly deep, they are all rendered with such color and personality that you get to know them (and like or dislike them) by the end of the book. Treasure Island is also unlike many modern novels in its combination of brevity and completeness: it successfully includes the entirety of a satisfying tale in a single, fairly slim book.Treasure Island tells of a turning point in the life of Jim Hawkins, a young, British teenager in the 1760s or 1770s. Partially by happenstance and partially through his own thoughtless actions, he uncovers a treasure map and becomes cabin boy on a voyage to recover gold buried on a remote island by the infamous pirate Captain Flint.Stevenson's writing doesn't give you a look inside Jim's head, so we only get to know him through his words and actions. Thus, the reader only comes to the gradual realization that Jim is a surprisingly dumb and foolish protagonist. Early on, it is evident that he has an excess of bravery. But apart from that, as scene follows scene, Jim repeatedly exhibits a certain naivete about the world that is not cured by his repeated realizations that he has erred. This may or may not be realistic- it's hard for me to say- but it's certainly not common for novel protagonists, who tend to be of above-average intelligence.We also get to know the other characters through their words and actions. Jim seldom passes judgment on any of the characters- and when he does, you have no confidence whatsoever in his feelings- leaving you to decide what you think of men like Squire Trelawney, Doctor Livesey, and above all, Long John Silver.Long John Silver is the star of the book- more complex, colorful, and just plain fun-to-read-about than any other character. Getting to know him is an important part of the book, so I won't say more about him here.The book does have flaws. It lacks any female or minority characters or viewpoints. The protagonist isn't particularly appealing, nor is he a good role model. The story leaves a glaring loose end (Trelawney's failure to keep the island's latitude and longitude a secret), the consequences of which I was waiting for throughout the entire book. And lastly, the simplicity of the tale precludes any particularly brilliant or impactful scenes or lessons. In short, the book doesn't attain greatness. But it's pretty good, and it achieves what it attempts to achieve.more
Re-reading this was an absolute pleasure from the first sentence to the last. Or to be precise, listening the audiobook with outstanding narration by Alfred Molina.Long John Silver is one of the extraordinary characters of literature, at times he almost feels on par with the creations of Shakespeare and Dickens. His extraordinary physical and psychological aptitude, his ambiguous amorality, and the way in which he controls from a position of servitude. The narrator, Jim Hawkins, and his group are more cookie cutter cardboard romantic heroes, but still interesting and compelling. And many of the characters with walk on parts, like Billy Bones and the blind pirate Pew, are fascinating.The plot moves along briskly, although the terrors are considerably greater in the first quarter--before the mutineers declare themselves--and toward the end when Jim ends up back with the pirates. In between is a decent amount of fighting and straight up adventure, which is well told and interesting but hardly something that on its own would stand the test of time.Occasionally all of the pirate talk feels a little oppressive and cliched, but then you remind yourself that this is the novel that invented all of it. But mostly the language lends a strong scent of salty reality to this classic boys adventure novel.more
A copy of this text is in my personal library. Actually in a junior high theatre class I'm teaching they are reading the musical version of this text. I wanted to read it to see the way it compared to the script. The reason I gave it three stars is I believe certain portions of this text contained words and phrases students would struggle comprehending. I wouldn't make it a class wide assignment, reading the book independently, but rather read it as a whole class. I would love to use this book as a read aloud and then select a scene from the play to act out. I think it would work well for readers theatre.more
Classic tale of Pirates and TreasureA pirate from Captain Flint’s ship who has Flint's treasure map stays at the Admiral Benbow Inn and when he dies Jim Hawkins (who becomes the cabin boy) finds the map and so begins the adventure. Sadly I’d never read this classic before although have seen a variety of adaptations. It’s a rollicking adventure tale that has had a massive impact on what we all think of when we think of pirates. Treasure maps marked with an X, parrots saying “pieces of eight”, 1 legged pirates (Long John Silver), the black spot etc etc. Although the language is a little dated it really doesn’t make the story any less readable.Overall – If your at all interested in pirates I think this is a must read!more
Title: Treasure IslandAuthor: Robert Louis StevensonRelease Date: February 25, 2006 [EBook #120][Last Updated: November 10, 2010]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ASCIIPROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK TREASURE ISLAND Produced by Judy Boss, John Hamm and David Widgermore
this book is not a book for me not enough action and just boringmore
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson was an excellent book that I enjoyed reading. I like adventures and have not read a lot of pirate stories but this was one that I liked. I could see this story being well perceived by young and old as well. I would recommend this to be read by others.more
Never having been a fan of the pirate genre I entered communication with Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island, one of its pillars, with some trepidation especially since as the author’s biographer Claire Harmon notes like his Jekyl and Hyde, it’s so well known that it hardly requires being read at all, “Long John Silver is more real to most people than any historical buccaneer.” I’d like to offer a narrative of rediscovering the genre, but young Jim Hawkins is such a greedy, repellent narrator and the various pirates so difficult to understand and the story points so subtly telegraphed, I was less thrilled than appalled. That Silver and Gunn are the most entertaining figures it does go without saying, but as Harmon hints because their old bones have been resurrected so many times since, the original now seems prosaic and slothful. But such things are not Stevenson’s fault, of course.more
Wow! This is the first time I experience a novel on audio. My reading experience was magnified, the story seemed more alive and personal. I don't know why I waited so long to hear a novel on audio. I will definitely give my future students the choice of enjoying stories this way too. I didn't care too much about the plot of the story and the words were a bit complicated for me, but I really enjoyed many of the character traits. I gets pirate stories have never appealed to me.more
I endeavored to read Treasure Island as an entry point into a chronological approach to adventure stories, golden-age science fiction, and later speculative ventures. It seems to me that this classic novel has done well to satisfy in that role, and I will also add that the Oxford World's Classics introduction, explanatory notes, and other supplements were useful, if unessential.That said, I am afraid there is little to recommend Treasure Island to the modern reader. The story itself has been surpassed many times over, and the archaic maritime language is a double-edged sword of charm and impediment; the writing is fun and quotable for the same reasons that often render it a right chore to comprehend. If one's sole purpose in selecting Stevenson's tale of the stalwart Hispaniola crew's quest for buried booty amid the treachery of Long John Silver upon Skeleton Island is merely to be entertained by a hardy lads' romp, it must be said that many superior (and less frustrating) options have become available since it was published in 1883. You and I are simply too removed from this work by time to enjoy it properly.However, I am ultimately glad that I read Treasure Island. Its historical value is clear both as a genre pioneer and as the origin for so many well-known pirate tropes, and, although it can be difficult in the telling, to be sure, the tale is not an unpleasant one.more
I thought this book was pretty neat. I read a super old edition my dad had when he was in school. It totally made me want to watch Muppet treasure island, one of my favorite movies growing up. After reading the book i am better able to appreciate some of the humor in the movie, like "you killed dead tom" and the talking crab that is supposed to be the parrot captain flint.more
This is a fun adventure book, and introduced all our pirate stereotypes. For adults, its a good lighthearted jaunt, for younger reader it would be very exciting. Hidden treasure, pirates, the sea..what's not to like?more
A rollicking adventure story, a coming of age, a swashbuckling sea-tale, a boy's book. I read this to my son over many nights before bed, and while I feared the violence would frighten him and cause nightmares, it did not; but it did hold his attention and get him talking and thinking (and drawing treasure maps). What fun!more
I know this is a classic and a must read for all children, but I'd never read it until now. The book stars Jim Hawkins, son of an inn keeper, who acquires a treasure map and sets out to find his fortune. Along the way he teams up with various characters, including Dr Livesey, Long John Silver and Ben Gunn. There are lots of twists and turns to keep you guessing what will happen next. Of course the ending is predictable (they get the treasure) but it's what happens along the way that makes this a great children's adventure. In my book the level of violence makes it unsuitable for reading to younger children, best wait until they are old enough to read it themselves.more
I read Kidnapped in 2010 and quite liked it, so I figured I’d give Treasure Island a go. Now I’m reflecting on whether perhaps Kidnapped was a book I enjoyed because it provided me with entertainment at a time when I didn’t have much else to do.Treasure Island is the classic pirate story, a book that spawned thousands of imitators and almost single-handedly created a genre. Young Jim Hawkins, the poor son of innkeepers, is swept up into excitement and adventure after one of his lodgers entrusts him with a treasure map before dying. Jim promptly takes the map to Dr. Livesey, local magistrate and gentleman, and together they assemble an expedition to recover the treasure from the titular Caribbean Island. All doesn’t go to plan, of course, with the crew turning out to be half pirates, and upon arrival on Treasure Island all manner of mutinous hijinks break out in the scramble to seize the treasure.Treasure Island is a pirate story with 19th century mores, where the good guys are upstanding English gentlemen and the pirates are villainous scoundrels – unlike modern incarnations, where Johnny Depp is cast as a dashing and romantic figure of fun, the script neatly sidestepping the fact that pirates are bad people who do bad things. (I dearly love Mister Gibbs, but I expect he’s raped his fair share.) Treasure Island contains a good amount of betrayal, cold-blooded murder and terrible fates, and to his credit, Stevenson does not shy away from the fact that this is the sort of thing that can utterly ruin a boy’s fantasised adventure:Although the sun shone bright and hot, and the shore birds were fishing and crying all around us, and you would have thought anyone would be glad to get to land after so long at sea, my heart sank, as the saying is, into my boots, and from that first look onward I hated the very thought of Treasure Island.And although the book has what you’d technically call a happy ending, it finishes on a dark note, with Jim still haunted by what happened on the island.These good points aside, I can’t recommend Treasure Island, largely because I had trouble maintaining an interest in it. It starts out and finishes well enough, yet drags in the centre, as Jim’s crew hold out a stockade against the pirates. There’s far too much technical detail, a wholly unnecessary switch to Dr. Livesey as narrator, and it’s all just poorly paced. As the book goes on, far too much time is spent debating the loyalties and power struggles of the various crews, and the men within the crews, with overly-wrought dialogue. I also felt that Stevenson was treating the plot like a chess game, moving pieces here and there, and having certain characters do things which made no sense simply because it was necessary for the plot (Jim sneaking off and recovering the ship against all odds is the prime offender here.) Kidnapped, in comparison, contained a number of unexpected twists and turns which never felt out of place or contrived.Not a bad book, but not a good one either – certainly a disappointment compared to its reputation, and not as good as Stevenson’s less-famous Kidnapped.more
This is not the classic I was expecting. I can see the roots of adventure stories, all the original establishment of what have become pirate cliches, but I just wasn't grabbed for most of the story and I'm not sure why that is. Some of Jim Hawkin's actions were too reckless for me to believe and I never grew close to his character, but then I lack the 19th century sense of British forthrightness that might have made me think his decisions more rational. Long John Silver I did like and appreciate throughout, and I was disappointed that his story's ending lacked any sort of power; you can see how this has been corrected in any movie rendition. Among RLS' works, his Jekyl and Hyde remains my favourite.more
A classic. Pirates are bad people. Let me add to that. Glamorous evil is a problem in fiction. I say 'a problem' not because positive representation of wicked characters has bad effects (although doubtless it does), but because it is so false to fact as to be jarring, to break fictional tone. There are exceptions to this rule. Satan is glamorous, but he's an angel -- and as the first or second most powerful created being, of course he's going to have some pace on the ball. But in general, wickedness is not glamorous, or inventive, or interesting. It's a person who will kill a stranger for money, and then spend the money on trash -- as squalid, loathsome, and weak as a humanity gets. That's the type of person who becomes a pirate, in point of fact; that's who a pirate is. Simone Weil has a great quote to this effect: “Imaginary evil is romantic and varied; real evil is gloomy, monotonous, barren, boring. Imaginary good is boring; real good is always new, marvelous, intoxicating.” Stevenson invests his pirates with real evil, in Weil's sense, and it's the critical tone-setting choice in the novel....my name is Alexander Smollett, I've flown my sovereign's colours, and I'll see you all to Davy Jones. You can't find the treasure. You can't sail the ship—there's not a man among you fit to sail the ship. You can't fight us—Gray, there, got away from five of you. Your ship's in irons, Master Silver; you're on a lee shore, and so you'll find. I stand here and tell you so; and they're the last good words you'll get from me, for in the name of heaven, I'll put a bullet in your back when next I meet youmore
Young Jim Hawkins finds adventure when a "gentleman of fortune" stays at his father's inn, and the old pirate's compatriots come looking for him -- and a treasure map!Treasure Island is the quintessential adventure tale: a daring hero, a treasure, and dastardly pirates. I had a few false starts trying to read it as a kid, but I drowned in the antiquated language due to a book that's a hundred years old set in the 1700s. But when I was without power for several days, it was the perfect book to take me far and away from my circumstances. Partly because I knew much of the storyline (mostly, I am embarrassed to admit, through watching Muppet Treasure Island as a kid), partly because Jim is clearly narrating events that happened before, there was never any doubt that our English heroes would make it through unscathed, but this true blue adventure tale is certainly entertaining.more
A beautifully rendered and surprisingly complex and morally ambivalent adventure tale about magical (if horrid) places like Treasure Island. A great rendering of fantasy and so convincing about the heroic role that a young man can play that one might forgive the bosh about "God save the Queen," English patriotism, and true men.more
When people are amazed that the Harry Potter books are for kids but they are fun for any age, I giggle and think about this book; Ms. Rowling was not the first.more
Today is International Talk Like a Pirate Day and the perfect opportunity to review Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson. The narrator and young hero of the book, Jim Hawkins is a very likeable character and I can definitely understand why this book was so popular with boys; who wouldn't want to be young Jim? It was interesting to finally meet the characters of Captain Flint and Long John Silver and I enjoyed the pirate dialogue by thunder!I was somewhat surprised to find the plot a little more layered than I expected, being written for young boys. I can definitely imagine a young reader enjoying the adventure the first time through, but discovering and understanding more about the nature of men on the second read, perhaps several years later.I confess I feel a little late to the party - only reading Treasure Island in my 30s - but it's never too late to catch up on a classic. Having read it now, I can't rightly say what makes Treasure Island a classic though, or why it has endured. It was first published in 1883, but is still popular today.more
Treasure Island is perhaps THE classic pirate's tale. Robert Louis Stevenson, the author, created a rich story of adventure and treachery on the high seas all seen through the eyes of a boy named Jim Hawkins. Jim starts off as the son of tavern owners in a humble little port village. When an old seaman stays at the tavern, trouble soon follows him in the form of a pirate crew seeking revenge. I will not give away any more specific plot points, but events move forward to a great treasure hunt, treachery, and a surprisingly engaging story for adults as well as children.more
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