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This deluxe ebook package features Mary Shelley’s classic gothic novel plus an extended excerpt of award winning author Kenneth Oppel’s thrilling prequel, This Dark Endeavor!

What happens when an obsession defies your control?

Victor Frankenstein has long sought the answer to creating new life. When he finally achieves his goal, he’s horrified by the results and abandons his creation, ready to forget what he’s done. But when tragedy befalls his family, Victor returns home to discover his creation is hiding nearby. To save his family from further despair, Frankenstein’s creature asks him to do the one thing he swore he never would do again.

Mary Shelley’s novel explores with chilling dimensions the questions that reside at our core. What is the fabric of life and the soul? Where are the limits of our imagination? Can man’s reach shatter the boundaries between science, nature and God?
Published: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers on Sep 6, 2011
ISBN: 9781442450219
List price: $0.99
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This is a short but sweet book. It's about a mother ,speaking to her daughter, stating how she will always be there to watch her grow.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was Mary Shelly's first novel, published when she was 21, and talked about ever since. I recommend it, but note that it starts slowly: the first 40 pages are all setup. Reread them after you're done and you'll see lots of things you missed the first time. And try to forget the various movie versions you may have seen.[WARNING: spoilers]I'll just say that I was surprised -- there are a few moments here that can still shock, for example Victor's flight from the newly-awakened creature, and the death of Justine. But the 'horror' in this book comes from dwelling inside the mind of Victor Frankenstein -- he's presented very attractively, but slowly it dawns on you that he's literally insane.One wonders, probably foolishly, if Mary Shelly consciously compared Frankenstein's fleeing the monster's 'birth' to her own mother's death a few days after Mary was born.Plot SummaryFraming story (Walton's letters): The novel begins with letters from Walton to his sister in England. He is leading an expedition to discover a sea route over the North Pole. His ship picks up a man drifting on an iceberg. This is Victor Frankenstein, who then takes over the narration.(Frankenstein's tale:) [Ch 1-4] Frankenstein is a brilliant student of natural philosophy in Ingolstadt. [Ch 5] He creates a humanoid creature, but when it begins to awaken he is horrified by it and flees. When he returns, it has disappeared. His friend Clerval arrives from their hometown of Geneva. The monster reappears for a moment, and Frankenstein, terrified, falls into a fever which lasts several months. [Ch 6] After he recovers, they journey to Geneva. [Ch 7] Just before they arrive, Frankenstein's young brother William is murdered. Justine, a servant girl, is arrested, but Victor suspects the monster. [Ch 8] Justine is tried, convicted, and executed. [Ch 9-10] Victor, seeking solace in the mountains, encounters the monster, who is fully articulate and demands that Victor listen to his story. (The monster's tale:) [Ch 11-16] The monster tells of his coming to consciousness, learning to speak and read, and his persecutions at the hand of mankind on account of his hideous appearance. He admits to the murder of William. [Ch 17] The monster promises to leave human society if Victor creates a mate for him. Victor reluctantly agrees.(Frankenstein resumes:) [Ch 18] Victor must travel to England to resume this work. He departs, with Clerval as companion. [Ch 19] They travel through England and Scotland. Victor leaves Clerval in Perth, then continues to the Orkneys, where he begins to create the new creature. [Ch 20] The monster appears, and Victor, convinced that his actions may threaten the entire human race, destroys his work-in-progress. The monster vows to pursue him forever, and leaves. Victor's boat goes adrift and lands in Ireland, where he is arrested: last night a murdered body was discovered.[Ch 21] The body is Clerval, clearly a victim of the monster. Victor becomes delirious and again spends several weeks in a fever. His father arrives; Victor is acquitted of the murder, and they prepare to return to Geneva. [Ch 22] They arrive in Geneva, and ten days later Victor and Elizabeth, his intended, are married. [Ch 23] On their wedding night, Elizabeth is murdered by the monster; the shock of this causes Victor's father's death several days later. Victor vows to track down and destroy his creation. He pursues the monster for years, and the monster in turn goads him onward and steadily northward, which brings the story to the present, in the Arctic.(Walton resumes:) Victor weakens and dies. The monster appears and weeps over his dead creator. He tells Walton his revenge is complete, and now he will immolate himself; he departs on his ice-raft.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
First line:~ I am by birth a Genevese; and my family is one of the most distinguished of that republic. ~Once again, she asks, why have I not read this book before? I loved Mary Shelley’s writing style. Not too much detail and she builds the characters and the story skilfully. No one comes out of this story unscathed. Dr. Frankenstein attempts to create ‘life’ and creates something he cannot accept. The creature abandoned by his ‘creator’, his ‘father’, is also rejected by everyone he comes in contact with. He lives his life alone, abandoned by society. Every effort he makes to approach humans with kindness and compassion is met with rebuke. In the pain and agony of his frustration he gives vent to his anger, this being the only thing he really knows. Dr. Frankenstein is equally abandoned by and abandons society. It is a tragic tale of fathers and sons, of prejudice and anger. Very sad. No one ever gives him a chance.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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This is a short but sweet book. It's about a mother ,speaking to her daughter, stating how she will always be there to watch her grow.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was Mary Shelly's first novel, published when she was 21, and talked about ever since. I recommend it, but note that it starts slowly: the first 40 pages are all setup. Reread them after you're done and you'll see lots of things you missed the first time. And try to forget the various movie versions you may have seen.[WARNING: spoilers]I'll just say that I was surprised -- there are a few moments here that can still shock, for example Victor's flight from the newly-awakened creature, and the death of Justine. But the 'horror' in this book comes from dwelling inside the mind of Victor Frankenstein -- he's presented very attractively, but slowly it dawns on you that he's literally insane.One wonders, probably foolishly, if Mary Shelly consciously compared Frankenstein's fleeing the monster's 'birth' to her own mother's death a few days after Mary was born.Plot SummaryFraming story (Walton's letters): The novel begins with letters from Walton to his sister in England. He is leading an expedition to discover a sea route over the North Pole. His ship picks up a man drifting on an iceberg. This is Victor Frankenstein, who then takes over the narration.(Frankenstein's tale:) [Ch 1-4] Frankenstein is a brilliant student of natural philosophy in Ingolstadt. [Ch 5] He creates a humanoid creature, but when it begins to awaken he is horrified by it and flees. When he returns, it has disappeared. His friend Clerval arrives from their hometown of Geneva. The monster reappears for a moment, and Frankenstein, terrified, falls into a fever which lasts several months. [Ch 6] After he recovers, they journey to Geneva. [Ch 7] Just before they arrive, Frankenstein's young brother William is murdered. Justine, a servant girl, is arrested, but Victor suspects the monster. [Ch 8] Justine is tried, convicted, and executed. [Ch 9-10] Victor, seeking solace in the mountains, encounters the monster, who is fully articulate and demands that Victor listen to his story. (The monster's tale:) [Ch 11-16] The monster tells of his coming to consciousness, learning to speak and read, and his persecutions at the hand of mankind on account of his hideous appearance. He admits to the murder of William. [Ch 17] The monster promises to leave human society if Victor creates a mate for him. Victor reluctantly agrees.(Frankenstein resumes:) [Ch 18] Victor must travel to England to resume this work. He departs, with Clerval as companion. [Ch 19] They travel through England and Scotland. Victor leaves Clerval in Perth, then continues to the Orkneys, where he begins to create the new creature. [Ch 20] The monster appears, and Victor, convinced that his actions may threaten the entire human race, destroys his work-in-progress. The monster vows to pursue him forever, and leaves. Victor's boat goes adrift and lands in Ireland, where he is arrested: last night a murdered body was discovered.[Ch 21] The body is Clerval, clearly a victim of the monster. Victor becomes delirious and again spends several weeks in a fever. His father arrives; Victor is acquitted of the murder, and they prepare to return to Geneva. [Ch 22] They arrive in Geneva, and ten days later Victor and Elizabeth, his intended, are married. [Ch 23] On their wedding night, Elizabeth is murdered by the monster; the shock of this causes Victor's father's death several days later. Victor vows to track down and destroy his creation. He pursues the monster for years, and the monster in turn goads him onward and steadily northward, which brings the story to the present, in the Arctic.(Walton resumes:) Victor weakens and dies. The monster appears and weeps over his dead creator. He tells Walton his revenge is complete, and now he will immolate himself; he departs on his ice-raft.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
First line:~ I am by birth a Genevese; and my family is one of the most distinguished of that republic. ~Once again, she asks, why have I not read this book before? I loved Mary Shelley’s writing style. Not too much detail and she builds the characters and the story skilfully. No one comes out of this story unscathed. Dr. Frankenstein attempts to create ‘life’ and creates something he cannot accept. The creature abandoned by his ‘creator’, his ‘father’, is also rejected by everyone he comes in contact with. He lives his life alone, abandoned by society. Every effort he makes to approach humans with kindness and compassion is met with rebuke. In the pain and agony of his frustration he gives vent to his anger, this being the only thing he really knows. Dr. Frankenstein is equally abandoned by and abandons society. It is a tragic tale of fathers and sons, of prejudice and anger. Very sad. No one ever gives him a chance.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This classical story of a mad scientist illustrates the tragedies that can happen when science or technology go too far. The basic story line is that a bright but demented scientist uses his talent to create another human being, but in the process he creates a monster. Ironically the monster is child-like, innocent, and full of wisdom and kindness. Yet, he is feared and hated by humanity because of the way he looks. The themes are deep since they beg the question, “When has science gone too far?” and “Why is humanity so shallow and quick to judge another human being when they are different?” I think this book can be used for excellent class discussion.
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A true classic. It is nothing like the movies. It is better! Not a scary as I had believed but a psychological thriller.
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This was one of the 'classics' that stood up fairly well when I re-read it, I thought.
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