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O enredo de O Sol Nasce Sempre (Fiesta) decorre na Europa após o termo da Primeira Guerra Mundial. Se exceptuarmos o toureiro Pedro Romero, todos os seus outros personagens principais se expatriaram dos Estados Unidos da América ou da Grã-Bretanha. E todos eles, quer tivessem vindo em busca de aventura ou de algo indefinido com que preencher o vazio das suas vidas, tinham acabado por instalar-se em Paris. Esta celebrizara-se, nos anos 20, graças à boémia esfuziante dos seus cafés e da sua intelectualidade. Aí se podiam, com efeito, encontrar pintores como Picasso, Miró ou Matisse, ou mulheres como a americana Gertrude Stein, que criara uma tertúlia onde diversos artistas plásticos ou escritores como James Joyce, F. Scott Fitzgerald e Ernest Hemingway se juntavam para trocar ideias. Mas se Paris garantia assim a todos uma vida interessante, a verdade é que muitos a sentiam também como vazia. De modo que, à semelhança aliás do que acontecera a Hemingway e a alguns dos seus amigos, um certo número de personagens deste romance pretenderão escapar à sofisticação e à corrupção da grande cidade, refugiando-se no universo mais tradicional da Espanha daqueles anos. E porque muitos se reconheceram neste retrato de uma geração sem raízes, O Sol Nasce Sempre (Fiesta) tornou-se rapidamente um romance de culto para os jovens europeus do período de entre as duas guerras.

Topics: Spain, Poignant, Spare, Lost Generation, Bullfighting, Expat Life, War, Love, Ennui, Sexuality, Modernism, Male Author, and American Author

Published: Scribner on
ISBN: 9781451655469
List price: $11.99
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I have looked forward for many years to reading another Hemingway novel. I loved A Farewell to Arms and the characters of Frederick Henry and Catherine Barkley have stayed with me for many years. With the understanding that The Sun Also Rises is considered by many to be Hemingway's finest work, I dove in hoping to be as enthralled as I was with AFTA. And so, because I was not, I wonder if I'm judging TSAR somewhat unfairly. But I cannot escape that fundamentally this book is about celebrating the flaws in characters and commending them for being selfish and hateful. This was simply something I did not enjoy. I rate this with three stars because the plot is good (once you get past the first section, which is essentially only to lay the groundwork for the rest of the novel) and because the characters are unforgettable. But they are unforgettable for very different reasons than Lieutenant Henry and his beloved nurse Barkley; they are unforgettable because they are, quite simply, immature and indecent people.

Perhaps I'm being too harsh here. I did enjoy Hemingway's simple style, and the descriptions of the festival at Pamplona are excellent, particularly of the bull fighting towards the end. But at the end of the day, what we have here are men who drink too much, who hate other men because they all desire the same woman, and that one woman is selfish, superficial and someone who uses men only for her ends. I found it very difficult to sympathize with any of them. Robert Cohn may very well be a petty man who is egotistical, but the characters constantly demean him not for these negative qualities but for his Jewish ethnicity. Michael Campbell is a drunken gentlemen prone to fits of rage and rants, but no one stands up to him and calls him out on it. Jake Barnes stands at the center of all of this, and while he seems to have more redeeming qualities than the rest, he also goes along with the childish antics of his friends and engages in foul behavior even when he is aware of its foulness. He is anti-Semitic towards Cohn like all the others and cannot find the inner strength to tear himself away from the poison that is Lady Brett Ashley. Brett Ashley is possibly the worst offender of them all, as she consistently does damage to everyone around her, seems to be aware of this damage, and simply chooses to ignore it as it does not serve her own selfish ends. If there was anything redeeming of the way these characters carry on, it is this: none of them, perhaps save Ashley, get what they want in the end.

My rating reflects the fact that I don't like the characters and I especially hated the anti-Semitic theme with regards to Cohn. But I will not dispute that it is a valuable book and it is written well. I think if anyone were searching for a novel that shows the fruits of pursuing a life of selfishness, depravity and above all drunkenness (I'm not entirely sure the characters were ever sober), this would be it. But don't expect to find characters you can empathize with, because they simply aren't here.more
I have looked forward for many years to reading another Hemingway novel. I loved A Farewell to Arms and the characters of Frederick Henry and Catherine Barkley have stayed with me for many years. With the understanding that The Sun Also Rises is considered by many to be Hemingway's finest work, I dove in hoping to be as enthralled as I was with AFTA. And so, because I was not, I wonder if I'm judging TSAR somewhat unfairly. But I cannot escape that fundamentally this book is about celebrating the flaws in characters and commending them for being selfish and hateful. This was simply something I did not enjoy. I rate this with three stars because the plot is good (once you get past the first section, which is essentially only to lay the groundwork for the rest of the novel) and because the characters are unforgettable. But they are unforgettable for very different reasons than Lieutenant Henry and his beloved nurse Barkley; they are unforgettable because they are, quite simply, immature and indecent people.

Perhaps I'm being too harsh here. I did enjoy Hemingway's simple style, and the descriptions of the festival at Pamplona are excellent, particularly of the bull fighting towards the end. But at the end of the day, what we have here are men who drink too much, who hate other men because they all desire the same woman, and that one woman is selfish, superficial and someone who uses men only for her ends. I found it very difficult to sympathize with any of them. Robert Cohn may very well be a petty man who is egotistical, but the characters constantly demean him not for these negative qualities but for his Jewish ethnicity. Michael Campbell is a drunken gentlemen prone to fits of rage and rants, but no one stands up to him and calls him out on it. Jake Barnes stands at the center of all of this, and while he seems to have more redeeming qualities than the rest, he also goes along with the childish antics of his friends and engages in foul behavior even when he is aware of its foulness. He is anti-Semitic towards Cohn like all the others and cannot find the inner strength to tear himself away from the poison that is Lady Brett Ashley. Brett Ashley is possibly the worst offender of them all, as she consistently does damage to everyone around her, seems to be aware of this damage, and simply chooses to ignore it as it does not serve her own selfish ends. If there was anything redeeming of the way these characters carry on, it is this: none of them, perhaps save Ashley, get what they want in the end.

My rating reflects the fact that I don't like the characters and I especially hated the anti-Semitic theme with regards to Cohn. But I will not dispute that it is a valuable book and it is written well. I think if anyone were searching for a novel that shows the fruits of pursuing a life of selfishness, depravity and above all drunkenness (I'm not entirely sure the characters were ever sober), this would be it. But don't expect to find characters you can empathize with, because they simply aren't here.more
Doing a re-read of the novel for the Seasonal Reading Challenge (Fall 2009). I loved this book when I studied it in high school, so it will be interesting to see if I feel the same way about it now.more
The whole novel I kept thinking about what kind of novel would the Robert Cohn novel be. Like, we were watching those bit players get drunk. And, really, devoting an entire novel to these rich (well, minus Mike OF COURSE) expats was a little boring at times. All I could think was, how crazy is it that we're not even getting the whole story because these narrators are all so drunk and high that most of the time they are secluding in their own little world and can barely see past their own noses. I bet if we heard from Cohn (don't even get me started on how tired I was getting about hearing about Jews and black people and all of the other insanely offensive terms and stereotypes Hemingway uses) we would see a much more honest account of all that was going on. I wish we could have that novel, too.more
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Reviews

I have looked forward for many years to reading another Hemingway novel. I loved A Farewell to Arms and the characters of Frederick Henry and Catherine Barkley have stayed with me for many years. With the understanding that The Sun Also Rises is considered by many to be Hemingway's finest work, I dove in hoping to be as enthralled as I was with AFTA. And so, because I was not, I wonder if I'm judging TSAR somewhat unfairly. But I cannot escape that fundamentally this book is about celebrating the flaws in characters and commending them for being selfish and hateful. This was simply something I did not enjoy. I rate this with three stars because the plot is good (once you get past the first section, which is essentially only to lay the groundwork for the rest of the novel) and because the characters are unforgettable. But they are unforgettable for very different reasons than Lieutenant Henry and his beloved nurse Barkley; they are unforgettable because they are, quite simply, immature and indecent people.

Perhaps I'm being too harsh here. I did enjoy Hemingway's simple style, and the descriptions of the festival at Pamplona are excellent, particularly of the bull fighting towards the end. But at the end of the day, what we have here are men who drink too much, who hate other men because they all desire the same woman, and that one woman is selfish, superficial and someone who uses men only for her ends. I found it very difficult to sympathize with any of them. Robert Cohn may very well be a petty man who is egotistical, but the characters constantly demean him not for these negative qualities but for his Jewish ethnicity. Michael Campbell is a drunken gentlemen prone to fits of rage and rants, but no one stands up to him and calls him out on it. Jake Barnes stands at the center of all of this, and while he seems to have more redeeming qualities than the rest, he also goes along with the childish antics of his friends and engages in foul behavior even when he is aware of its foulness. He is anti-Semitic towards Cohn like all the others and cannot find the inner strength to tear himself away from the poison that is Lady Brett Ashley. Brett Ashley is possibly the worst offender of them all, as she consistently does damage to everyone around her, seems to be aware of this damage, and simply chooses to ignore it as it does not serve her own selfish ends. If there was anything redeeming of the way these characters carry on, it is this: none of them, perhaps save Ashley, get what they want in the end.

My rating reflects the fact that I don't like the characters and I especially hated the anti-Semitic theme with regards to Cohn. But I will not dispute that it is a valuable book and it is written well. I think if anyone were searching for a novel that shows the fruits of pursuing a life of selfishness, depravity and above all drunkenness (I'm not entirely sure the characters were ever sober), this would be it. But don't expect to find characters you can empathize with, because they simply aren't here.more
I have looked forward for many years to reading another Hemingway novel. I loved A Farewell to Arms and the characters of Frederick Henry and Catherine Barkley have stayed with me for many years. With the understanding that The Sun Also Rises is considered by many to be Hemingway's finest work, I dove in hoping to be as enthralled as I was with AFTA. And so, because I was not, I wonder if I'm judging TSAR somewhat unfairly. But I cannot escape that fundamentally this book is about celebrating the flaws in characters and commending them for being selfish and hateful. This was simply something I did not enjoy. I rate this with three stars because the plot is good (once you get past the first section, which is essentially only to lay the groundwork for the rest of the novel) and because the characters are unforgettable. But they are unforgettable for very different reasons than Lieutenant Henry and his beloved nurse Barkley; they are unforgettable because they are, quite simply, immature and indecent people.

Perhaps I'm being too harsh here. I did enjoy Hemingway's simple style, and the descriptions of the festival at Pamplona are excellent, particularly of the bull fighting towards the end. But at the end of the day, what we have here are men who drink too much, who hate other men because they all desire the same woman, and that one woman is selfish, superficial and someone who uses men only for her ends. I found it very difficult to sympathize with any of them. Robert Cohn may very well be a petty man who is egotistical, but the characters constantly demean him not for these negative qualities but for his Jewish ethnicity. Michael Campbell is a drunken gentlemen prone to fits of rage and rants, but no one stands up to him and calls him out on it. Jake Barnes stands at the center of all of this, and while he seems to have more redeeming qualities than the rest, he also goes along with the childish antics of his friends and engages in foul behavior even when he is aware of its foulness. He is anti-Semitic towards Cohn like all the others and cannot find the inner strength to tear himself away from the poison that is Lady Brett Ashley. Brett Ashley is possibly the worst offender of them all, as she consistently does damage to everyone around her, seems to be aware of this damage, and simply chooses to ignore it as it does not serve her own selfish ends. If there was anything redeeming of the way these characters carry on, it is this: none of them, perhaps save Ashley, get what they want in the end.

My rating reflects the fact that I don't like the characters and I especially hated the anti-Semitic theme with regards to Cohn. But I will not dispute that it is a valuable book and it is written well. I think if anyone were searching for a novel that shows the fruits of pursuing a life of selfishness, depravity and above all drunkenness (I'm not entirely sure the characters were ever sober), this would be it. But don't expect to find characters you can empathize with, because they simply aren't here.more
Doing a re-read of the novel for the Seasonal Reading Challenge (Fall 2009). I loved this book when I studied it in high school, so it will be interesting to see if I feel the same way about it now.more
The whole novel I kept thinking about what kind of novel would the Robert Cohn novel be. Like, we were watching those bit players get drunk. And, really, devoting an entire novel to these rich (well, minus Mike OF COURSE) expats was a little boring at times. All I could think was, how crazy is it that we're not even getting the whole story because these narrators are all so drunk and high that most of the time they are secluding in their own little world and can barely see past their own noses. I bet if we heard from Cohn (don't even get me started on how tired I was getting about hearing about Jews and black people and all of the other insanely offensive terms and stereotypes Hemingway uses) we would see a much more honest account of all that was going on. I wish we could have that novel, too.more
The whole novel I kept thinking about what kind of novel would the Robert Cohn novel be. Like, we were watching those bit players get drunk. And, really, devoting an entire novel to these rich (well, minus Mike OF COURSE) expats was a little boring at times. All I could think was, how crazy is it that we're not even getting the whole story because these narrators are all so drunk and high that most of the time they are secluding in their own little world and can barely see past their own noses. I bet if we heard from Cohn (don't even get me started on how tired I was getting about hearing about Jews and black people and all of the other insanely offensive terms and stereotypes Hemingway uses) we would see a much more honest account of all that was going on. I wish we could have that novel, too.more
Audiobook reread 12/2011. I listened to this while driving back and forth to work with the rest of the working stiffs. It is a good book, and I enjoyed it a great deal. It is a sad and funny book. A sad, funny book. And I enjoyed it a great deal.more
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