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One of the most beloved children's books of all time and the inspiration for a feature film, a television miniseries, and a Broadway musical, The Secret Garden is the best-known work of Frances Hodgson Burnett. In this unforgettable story, three children find healing and friendship in a magical forgotten garden on the haunting Yorkshire moors.
Published: Aladdin on
ISBN: 9781442457508
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I listened to the audiobook rendition of this classic novel while refoldering. I read the book in print 20 years ago. I guess it was atypical of a 16-year old boy to read this book, but I was not a typical 16-year old boy. Megan Follows helped too. Anyhow, Anne Shirley wins me over every time with her cheerfulness, resourcefulness, intellect and determination. The character I relate to most is Matthew Cuthbert who I think is my literary hero. (I wept when he died). Anyone who hasn't read this wonderful novel - child or adult, male or female - should give it a try.more
I grew up with Anne and her stories, adventures, sadness and friends, and still love her today. LM Montgomery has given me a love of all things Canadian, avenues of trees, kindred spirits, imagination and storytelling. And I have several lovely friends named Ann (both with an E and without), surely there is a connection?!more
I read this when I was about ten or eleven, and forgot how much I adored it. I've finally got the whole set of the Anne books, so I sat down to reread this one today. It's easy to read, and charming, and more touching than I'd remembered -- I came over all sniffly a couple of times. And I also had a lot of delighted little giggles.more
Revisiting an old favorite via audiobook. Caruso captures Anne's spirit wonderfully well, and her narration is top-notch. The story is a bit more treacly than I remember at the beginning, and I found myself sympathizing with Marilla when Anne was nattering endlessly about some foolishness. I got over it all by the middle of the book and wept at the end. Very well-done.more
Oh! It was better than I remembered. I laughed out loud so many times; I can't remember the last time a book made me laugh like that, and so often. And I cried like a fool at the end. It's been so long (20 years, I suppose), I'd all together forgotten how it ended.

So glad I revisited this one. A childhood favorite that stands the test of time.more
April 2009 Church of the Cross Book Club selection.

The first of my favorite series of books; I come back to them again and again. This is my comfort food book. Previously read October 2006 and many times before that.more
I've never read this before, and I found it delightful. Anne is such a real character. I'll be reading through the rest of this series.more
I remember watching the series on the Disney Channel as a child, but never reading the book. I recently re-watched the series and decided to give the books a go -- and I absolutely loved them. Anne's journey and growth as a person is so fascinating. I was engrossed, not wanting to put the book down to see what Anne could get up to next. I am working my way through the series now.more
This was a fun read. I have always been interested in reading any of the Anne books because I am such a fan of the movies that were produced with Megan Follow in them. I went in with the knowledge that they may be different from each other, but I left this book being more charmed than I intended to be. I could feel the progression of Anne developing in the characterization of Montgomery in a way that I haven't felt in many other books. I knew she was growing up as I noticed subtle slight changes. It made me appreciate what a gifted writer is capable of doing if they put their mind to it.more
Ok...sentimental as all get out ..but don't you just sometimes need that =Dmore
"If the path set before her feet was to be narrow she knew that flower's of quiet happiness would bloom along it." Taken from the last chapter after Matthew died and Marilla is discovered to have severe eye problems. Anne decides to give up her scholarship and teach at her local school so she can help Marilla and they can keep Green Gables. Anne has a vivid imagination for beauty in nature.more
What a strange sensation: I have never enjoyed a book so much where I completely loathed the main character. If I were Marilla, I probably would have smothered Anne in her sleep; she's so obnoxious. Her adventures are very amusing, howevermore
This was a really cute story. Anne is so likeable, but I wish she would have kept a little more of that child-like imagination as she grew.more
I thought this was a great book about friendship and learning the ways of life and growing up to be a whole different wonderful person. I loved how much Anne amigned about almost everything and believed in herself.more
Anne begins an adventure at Green Gables, outside of Prince Edwards Island. Siblings, Marilla and Matthew decided to adopt a young boy but by mistake they received Anne. At first Marilla wants Anne to return to the Orphanage but after a couple of days changes her mind. The book talks about Anne's past and her adventures in making a home. When Anne turns 16, she goes to an academy to get her teaching license where she gets her license in one year and wins a very important scholarship. The scholarship allows her to obtain her B.A. at another college. Towards the end of the book there is a series of unfortunate events that leads Anne to give away her scholarship and stay at home. Anne gets a teaching job not too far from home.more
I know several people who consider this book to be a childhood favorite, my own mother being one of them. In fact, she gave me this copy of the novel several years ago and I let it languish on my shelves until now. I certainly understand why people cherish it so much. Precocious and spunky Anne is charming (even though she talks too much); I adored her imagination. We probably would have been kindred spirits had I read this book back when my mom first recommended it.Overall, this coming of age story is quite sweet. Anne learns the true meaning of friendship, how to accept her looks (after dying her hair green!), and grows as a student. Her education takes the forefront of this story, especially at the end, and she becomes quite the grown-up in 373 pages. I would have slightly preferred spending more time in Anne’s imagination than reading about her studying for college examination, but I guess all little girls must grow up. Lucky for me, Montgomery’s novel is here to remind me of life as an imaginative child.more
There are several different ways in which I could approach a review of Anne of Green Gable, but in fairness to the book, I think I need to review with a strong consideration that I am not representative of the target audience. Montgomery's classic is a book that managed to slip past me in my book-greedy youth. For me the time period when such a book would have been effective was rather small, between the years of 9-11. I managed to hit all the others of this genre-Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, Caddie Woodlawn, Greengage Summer...but not Anne. I am sorry I did not read it then. Casting myself back to those days, I ask, would 10 year old me liked Anne? I think at 10 I would have been enraptured. As a 50 year old reader, all I can say is that the story is a great deal of charm, but the character of Anne for the first 3/4 of the book drove me a bit mad. Lord, how the child gushes. Perhaps it is my slightly pessimistic turn, but her always looking at the sunny side of life was wearying. Then there is her tendency to frequently repeat certain of her pet tenants. Since the days of my mother reading Chicken Little to me, I have hated repetitiveness. One of my chief complaints with Dickens is his love of giving certain characters oft repeated mantras. This is not character development. Okay it is, but only of the worst and least subtle sort. The moralistic tone of the story was a bit much for me as well. All of this said, I probably would have loved this book at 10.more
It’s funny how books that captured your imagination as a child are so very different for you as an adult. I’m not saying Anne of Green Gables was a bad read as an adult but it was so much different than I remember it being. For instance, I don’t remember Anne talking so much. Really, she never shuts up! It’s so endearing though and you come to quickly understand why Matthew and Marilla fell in love with this red-haired orphan. I also remembered the decision as to whether or not Anne would stay was much more drawn out but that could have been how I perceived it as a child. I keep saying as a child because I think the last time I read this book was probably when I was 10. Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, brother and sister who live on the Green Gables farm in Avonlea on Prince Edward Island, decide to adopt a boy to help out with the farm work since Matthew is getting up in age. Arrangements are made and Matthew leaves to pick up the boy at the train station. He comes home with a red-haired girl who won’t stop talking. Marilla wants to send her back but Matthew has already become attached and sort of nudges Marilla to think about keeping her. Anne, even with her loquacious ways, manages to charm Marilla who decides she can stay. Anne is enchanted with her new home, a new friend, and even her new school. However, she’s not always the proper little girl she should be and gets into several incidents that somehow all manage to work themselves out for the best.Anne of Green Gables is such a sweet book and pretty funny too. There’s not much that happens in Avonlea that doesn’t get back to Marilla, and Anne, who it must be said is not a bad child in the least, is always doing something that gets talked about. One day it’s flowers in her bonnet, telling ghost stories with her dear friend Diana, or cracking Gilbert Blythe over the head with her writing slate --- Marilla hears about it. That’s small town living for you.Reading this as an adult, I found it a lot funnier than I did as a child. At 10 years-old, Anne was a bit of hero. She was courageous and she stood up for herself. She was a person with guts and she was really smart. I loved all that about her as a child. As an adult, I can see how everything she did was vexing to every adult in her vicinity but it’s also so easy to see how everyone could love her. The kindness and caring stand out to me now but I don’t think I saw that as a child. Now, I’m also amused by the nosy neighbors, the teacher who’s in love with the student, and how parenting styles differ among the women in the story. I’m not saying that to be sexist, but it’s the women in this story that talk about it, not the men. I’m glad I went back to this as an adult. My appreciation for it is different but all together much the same. Anne of Green Gables will always be a favorite of mine.more
The classic story of the red headed orphan who is adopted by accident by a Prince Edward Island spinster and her bachelor brother is still a lot of fun to read. Despite being overly romantic, the story moves along very quickly and should keep a young person's interest. After recently watching the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's production with my granddaughters and a recent attendance at the local Kempenfelt Players production the musical version of the story, I felt I should read the book. I was not disappointed.more
A reread of a book I thought, even as a child, that I ought to have liked better as a child. I'm not sure how many of the Anne books I actually read as a sprout (more than just the first, surely, and, certainly, not all of them--and, in fact, I'm not sure I actually read any of them; they may have been read to me), but I know I only liked them okay, and several of my friends liked them a good deal better than I did. That being said, there was a lot in this volume that I remembered clearly and fondly (being in the "depths of despair" and Anne's trials with geometry, in particular). I had forgotten how episodic the book is, and that the first book takes Anne, in only just over 300 pages, from eleven to nearly seventeen. It's episodic nature may have been partly why I didn't warm to it as a kid, as then (and now), I generally like my books hung on solid stories with firm narrative thrust. Still, this was a pleasant and enjoyable read, it does make me want to read more about Anne, and I'm glad I came back to it after all these years.more
Delightful, though fairly fluffy. An excellent gift for a girl between about eight and twelve, especially if she's bright and a little flighty or strong-willed. Women who remember being bright and flighty or strong-willed will probably also enjoy it. There's no real plot beyond "growing up as a smart girl in late 19th-century rural Canada," though of course things happen and character growth occurs and all of that good kind of stuff. I enjoyed it, but I also used to look out at forests and imagine them to be far more spectacular than they really were, and such.The only reason I took half a star off is that I really do like reading about action and adventure a bit more than reading about meandering through childhood and growing as a person.more
L.M Montgomery's classic story Anne of Green Gables follows the adventures of Anne Shirley after she is adopted by siblings Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert.This Canadian classic stands the test of time. Anne Shirley is a chatty and fanciful girl who over time matures but still retains a sense of whimsy. L.M Montgomery has a way with description that makes you feel like you're really at Green Gables and just waiting to try some of Marilla's baking. Extremely well written, one is reminded of their own flights of childhood imagination.more
Anne of Green Gables is a classic for obvious reasons. This story takes the story line familiar in video or CD format and brings it to life in orchestra of language. A welcome addition to a collection. more
Anne of Green Gables is a classic for obvious reasons. This story takes the story line familiar in video or CD format and brings it to life in orchestra of language. A welcome addition to a collection. more
Anne of Green Gables is one of the first series I really remember reading. I'm sure I read The Boxcar Children first, but when I think of my first I think of the Anne series. I would have to say that I fully credit this series with my love of books and readings. I loved it so much that I had to have every book by Lucy Maud Montgomery (sans all the short story collections). I enjoyed Anne's attitude and loved the mistakes that she made and the adventures that she went on. As she grew up, she didn't get boring, her adventures just changed and I enjoyed them just as much. While this is historical fiction, and therefore might not be for everyone, I would still encourage everyone to give it a chance.more
Read all 170 reviews

Reviews

I listened to the audiobook rendition of this classic novel while refoldering. I read the book in print 20 years ago. I guess it was atypical of a 16-year old boy to read this book, but I was not a typical 16-year old boy. Megan Follows helped too. Anyhow, Anne Shirley wins me over every time with her cheerfulness, resourcefulness, intellect and determination. The character I relate to most is Matthew Cuthbert who I think is my literary hero. (I wept when he died). Anyone who hasn't read this wonderful novel - child or adult, male or female - should give it a try.more
I grew up with Anne and her stories, adventures, sadness and friends, and still love her today. LM Montgomery has given me a love of all things Canadian, avenues of trees, kindred spirits, imagination and storytelling. And I have several lovely friends named Ann (both with an E and without), surely there is a connection?!more
I read this when I was about ten or eleven, and forgot how much I adored it. I've finally got the whole set of the Anne books, so I sat down to reread this one today. It's easy to read, and charming, and more touching than I'd remembered -- I came over all sniffly a couple of times. And I also had a lot of delighted little giggles.more
Revisiting an old favorite via audiobook. Caruso captures Anne's spirit wonderfully well, and her narration is top-notch. The story is a bit more treacly than I remember at the beginning, and I found myself sympathizing with Marilla when Anne was nattering endlessly about some foolishness. I got over it all by the middle of the book and wept at the end. Very well-done.more
Oh! It was better than I remembered. I laughed out loud so many times; I can't remember the last time a book made me laugh like that, and so often. And I cried like a fool at the end. It's been so long (20 years, I suppose), I'd all together forgotten how it ended.

So glad I revisited this one. A childhood favorite that stands the test of time.more
April 2009 Church of the Cross Book Club selection.

The first of my favorite series of books; I come back to them again and again. This is my comfort food book. Previously read October 2006 and many times before that.more
I've never read this before, and I found it delightful. Anne is such a real character. I'll be reading through the rest of this series.more
I remember watching the series on the Disney Channel as a child, but never reading the book. I recently re-watched the series and decided to give the books a go -- and I absolutely loved them. Anne's journey and growth as a person is so fascinating. I was engrossed, not wanting to put the book down to see what Anne could get up to next. I am working my way through the series now.more
This was a fun read. I have always been interested in reading any of the Anne books because I am such a fan of the movies that were produced with Megan Follow in them. I went in with the knowledge that they may be different from each other, but I left this book being more charmed than I intended to be. I could feel the progression of Anne developing in the characterization of Montgomery in a way that I haven't felt in many other books. I knew she was growing up as I noticed subtle slight changes. It made me appreciate what a gifted writer is capable of doing if they put their mind to it.more
Ok...sentimental as all get out ..but don't you just sometimes need that =Dmore
"If the path set before her feet was to be narrow she knew that flower's of quiet happiness would bloom along it." Taken from the last chapter after Matthew died and Marilla is discovered to have severe eye problems. Anne decides to give up her scholarship and teach at her local school so she can help Marilla and they can keep Green Gables. Anne has a vivid imagination for beauty in nature.more
What a strange sensation: I have never enjoyed a book so much where I completely loathed the main character. If I were Marilla, I probably would have smothered Anne in her sleep; she's so obnoxious. Her adventures are very amusing, howevermore
This was a really cute story. Anne is so likeable, but I wish she would have kept a little more of that child-like imagination as she grew.more
I thought this was a great book about friendship and learning the ways of life and growing up to be a whole different wonderful person. I loved how much Anne amigned about almost everything and believed in herself.more
Anne begins an adventure at Green Gables, outside of Prince Edwards Island. Siblings, Marilla and Matthew decided to adopt a young boy but by mistake they received Anne. At first Marilla wants Anne to return to the Orphanage but after a couple of days changes her mind. The book talks about Anne's past and her adventures in making a home. When Anne turns 16, she goes to an academy to get her teaching license where she gets her license in one year and wins a very important scholarship. The scholarship allows her to obtain her B.A. at another college. Towards the end of the book there is a series of unfortunate events that leads Anne to give away her scholarship and stay at home. Anne gets a teaching job not too far from home.more
I know several people who consider this book to be a childhood favorite, my own mother being one of them. In fact, she gave me this copy of the novel several years ago and I let it languish on my shelves until now. I certainly understand why people cherish it so much. Precocious and spunky Anne is charming (even though she talks too much); I adored her imagination. We probably would have been kindred spirits had I read this book back when my mom first recommended it.Overall, this coming of age story is quite sweet. Anne learns the true meaning of friendship, how to accept her looks (after dying her hair green!), and grows as a student. Her education takes the forefront of this story, especially at the end, and she becomes quite the grown-up in 373 pages. I would have slightly preferred spending more time in Anne’s imagination than reading about her studying for college examination, but I guess all little girls must grow up. Lucky for me, Montgomery’s novel is here to remind me of life as an imaginative child.more
There are several different ways in which I could approach a review of Anne of Green Gable, but in fairness to the book, I think I need to review with a strong consideration that I am not representative of the target audience. Montgomery's classic is a book that managed to slip past me in my book-greedy youth. For me the time period when such a book would have been effective was rather small, between the years of 9-11. I managed to hit all the others of this genre-Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, Caddie Woodlawn, Greengage Summer...but not Anne. I am sorry I did not read it then. Casting myself back to those days, I ask, would 10 year old me liked Anne? I think at 10 I would have been enraptured. As a 50 year old reader, all I can say is that the story is a great deal of charm, but the character of Anne for the first 3/4 of the book drove me a bit mad. Lord, how the child gushes. Perhaps it is my slightly pessimistic turn, but her always looking at the sunny side of life was wearying. Then there is her tendency to frequently repeat certain of her pet tenants. Since the days of my mother reading Chicken Little to me, I have hated repetitiveness. One of my chief complaints with Dickens is his love of giving certain characters oft repeated mantras. This is not character development. Okay it is, but only of the worst and least subtle sort. The moralistic tone of the story was a bit much for me as well. All of this said, I probably would have loved this book at 10.more
It’s funny how books that captured your imagination as a child are so very different for you as an adult. I’m not saying Anne of Green Gables was a bad read as an adult but it was so much different than I remember it being. For instance, I don’t remember Anne talking so much. Really, she never shuts up! It’s so endearing though and you come to quickly understand why Matthew and Marilla fell in love with this red-haired orphan. I also remembered the decision as to whether or not Anne would stay was much more drawn out but that could have been how I perceived it as a child. I keep saying as a child because I think the last time I read this book was probably when I was 10. Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, brother and sister who live on the Green Gables farm in Avonlea on Prince Edward Island, decide to adopt a boy to help out with the farm work since Matthew is getting up in age. Arrangements are made and Matthew leaves to pick up the boy at the train station. He comes home with a red-haired girl who won’t stop talking. Marilla wants to send her back but Matthew has already become attached and sort of nudges Marilla to think about keeping her. Anne, even with her loquacious ways, manages to charm Marilla who decides she can stay. Anne is enchanted with her new home, a new friend, and even her new school. However, she’s not always the proper little girl she should be and gets into several incidents that somehow all manage to work themselves out for the best.Anne of Green Gables is such a sweet book and pretty funny too. There’s not much that happens in Avonlea that doesn’t get back to Marilla, and Anne, who it must be said is not a bad child in the least, is always doing something that gets talked about. One day it’s flowers in her bonnet, telling ghost stories with her dear friend Diana, or cracking Gilbert Blythe over the head with her writing slate --- Marilla hears about it. That’s small town living for you.Reading this as an adult, I found it a lot funnier than I did as a child. At 10 years-old, Anne was a bit of hero. She was courageous and she stood up for herself. She was a person with guts and she was really smart. I loved all that about her as a child. As an adult, I can see how everything she did was vexing to every adult in her vicinity but it’s also so easy to see how everyone could love her. The kindness and caring stand out to me now but I don’t think I saw that as a child. Now, I’m also amused by the nosy neighbors, the teacher who’s in love with the student, and how parenting styles differ among the women in the story. I’m not saying that to be sexist, but it’s the women in this story that talk about it, not the men. I’m glad I went back to this as an adult. My appreciation for it is different but all together much the same. Anne of Green Gables will always be a favorite of mine.more
The classic story of the red headed orphan who is adopted by accident by a Prince Edward Island spinster and her bachelor brother is still a lot of fun to read. Despite being overly romantic, the story moves along very quickly and should keep a young person's interest. After recently watching the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's production with my granddaughters and a recent attendance at the local Kempenfelt Players production the musical version of the story, I felt I should read the book. I was not disappointed.more
A reread of a book I thought, even as a child, that I ought to have liked better as a child. I'm not sure how many of the Anne books I actually read as a sprout (more than just the first, surely, and, certainly, not all of them--and, in fact, I'm not sure I actually read any of them; they may have been read to me), but I know I only liked them okay, and several of my friends liked them a good deal better than I did. That being said, there was a lot in this volume that I remembered clearly and fondly (being in the "depths of despair" and Anne's trials with geometry, in particular). I had forgotten how episodic the book is, and that the first book takes Anne, in only just over 300 pages, from eleven to nearly seventeen. It's episodic nature may have been partly why I didn't warm to it as a kid, as then (and now), I generally like my books hung on solid stories with firm narrative thrust. Still, this was a pleasant and enjoyable read, it does make me want to read more about Anne, and I'm glad I came back to it after all these years.more
Delightful, though fairly fluffy. An excellent gift for a girl between about eight and twelve, especially if she's bright and a little flighty or strong-willed. Women who remember being bright and flighty or strong-willed will probably also enjoy it. There's no real plot beyond "growing up as a smart girl in late 19th-century rural Canada," though of course things happen and character growth occurs and all of that good kind of stuff. I enjoyed it, but I also used to look out at forests and imagine them to be far more spectacular than they really were, and such.The only reason I took half a star off is that I really do like reading about action and adventure a bit more than reading about meandering through childhood and growing as a person.more
L.M Montgomery's classic story Anne of Green Gables follows the adventures of Anne Shirley after she is adopted by siblings Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert.This Canadian classic stands the test of time. Anne Shirley is a chatty and fanciful girl who over time matures but still retains a sense of whimsy. L.M Montgomery has a way with description that makes you feel like you're really at Green Gables and just waiting to try some of Marilla's baking. Extremely well written, one is reminded of their own flights of childhood imagination.more
Anne of Green Gables is a classic for obvious reasons. This story takes the story line familiar in video or CD format and brings it to life in orchestra of language. A welcome addition to a collection. more
Anne of Green Gables is a classic for obvious reasons. This story takes the story line familiar in video or CD format and brings it to life in orchestra of language. A welcome addition to a collection. more
Anne of Green Gables is one of the first series I really remember reading. I'm sure I read The Boxcar Children first, but when I think of my first I think of the Anne series. I would have to say that I fully credit this series with my love of books and readings. I loved it so much that I had to have every book by Lucy Maud Montgomery (sans all the short story collections). I enjoyed Anne's attitude and loved the mistakes that she made and the adventures that she went on. As she grew up, she didn't get boring, her adventures just changed and I enjoyed them just as much. While this is historical fiction, and therefore might not be for everyone, I would still encourage everyone to give it a chance.more
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