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One of the most beloved children's books of all time and the inspiration for a feature film, a television miniseries, and a Broadway musical, The Secret Garden is the best-known work of Frances Hodgson Burnett. In this unforgettable story, three children find healing and friendship in a magical forgotten garden on the haunting Yorkshire moors.
Published: Aladdin on Mar 20, 2012
ISBN: 9781442457508
List price: $6.99
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A reread of a book I adored as a child.



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Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
the book is very intersting and thrilling.recommended to read the book.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Heart-warming story about a young boy who was believed to be too sick to go outside, and how his friendship with a young girl helped him more than medicine. A good book to teach the value of friends, health, and how to develop a plot when writing.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
After the sudden death of her parents, Mary Lennox is sent from their home in India to the distant English estate of a family friend. Sad and lonely, her only interest lies in a secret garden, abandoned after a tragic accident occurred there. With the help of Dickon, and engaging local boy, and Colin, her guardian's invalid son, Mary's spirit is gradually reawakened as they bring the garden back to life. 108 minread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A longtime favorite of mine, and now my daughters are coming to love it. The story of an orphaned girl who is sent to England to live in a huge manor house on the moors with her absentee uncle. She comes to befriend her bedridden cousing and a magical Yorkshire boy. The children find a secret garden that works its magic on all three of them and changes them forever. The "secret" aspect of the garden, which becomes a special place for the child characters away from grownups, is very appealing to chldren.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
My love of the Gothic genre started here, in sixth grade when I found this book in the school library. It made me love books.I still remember that wistful feeling after I'd read the last page and closed the book...read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read as a child, reread as an adult. Understood the message better as an adult (although ti was a little unsubtle at times!) but still enjoyed it.Orphaned Mary returns to England from India, where she has been spoilt rotten by her now dead parents and servants.She now lives, seemingly alone, in a large, rambling house where the servants are too busy to do everything for her, and soon has to learn that she needs to make her own entertainment. Exercise outdoors soon begins to improve her health, making her less sallow, but stronger. She makes friends with both the old gardener and a robin, the latter breaking the secret place of "The Secret Garden". The garden was locked up on the death of her unknown aunt - she has yet to meet her uncle, who has been off wondering the world since the death of his wife.She also becomes friends with Dicken, the brother of one of the housemaids and between them they start bringing the garden back to life.Mary then finds out that she's not the only child in the house. Her cousin Colin is confined to bed, either because of, or resulting in him being a sick, weakly bad tempered child. In secret, mary and Dicken take Colin to the secret garden and with attention, fresh air, exercise and the right food, Colin begins to gain his strength. Both he and Mary learn to share and be less pampered and stand up for themselves and what is right.Colin's father returns to find Colin fit and healthy, running around. The Garden is open and nearly back to it's original state. He learns that perhaps he should lock things away (including looking after his son).read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A uplifting story of a sullen child who becomes a better person through finding and cultivating the garden of the title. The story is also about the redemption of at least two other characters. I wasn't clear why everyone was so afraid of Colin, initially a weak and helpless ten year old. Quite good to read as a counterbalance to some of the serious stuff I have been reading.read more
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This is an illustrated version and it is a treasure. It also contains the complete story, not just an abbreviated version, which is bonus.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
You need a secret garden of your own to read this in.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Mini Book Review: I was disappointed when I first started the book as I heard so many fabulous things about this classic. I almost gave up after about 30 pages as it was hard to read about a child who was just utterly unlikeable (and yes I can see how she bacame that way) But than something happened about 45 pages in I started falling in love with her and wanted to know more. Such a charming, beautiful story and I now know why so many people list this as one of their favorite stories. Since I have to get 3 reviews done by New Years Eve (Tomorrow) this is going to be a quickie review. Fabulous character development and wonderful use of setting. You felt like you knew these characters and let me tell you the whole time I was reading, I also imagined that I was on the moors with the children. As a child this would be a truly marvelous read. As an adult my only negative comments would be that some might stop reading because at the beginning Mary is so unlikeable. Also the ending is a tad saccharine and predictable - but I really didn't mind that as I am a big softie. To put it simply it is a lovely sweet innocent tale of the importance of play, good fresh air and the power of imagination.4.5 Dewey'sI purchased this at the Indigo at the Eaton Centre for my BBC 100 Top Books Challenge (Yeah I totally failed I only finished 2 of the 5 I was going to review - but hey I moved across the country and became at stay at home mom)read more
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Had this read to me when I was 8 or 9 by my teacher. She was English so was able to get all the accents right in the story and bought it alive. Bought my own copy as an adult and read it again and it was still as good as I remembered. A classicread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
After mistress Mary is sent to live with her uncle after her mother dies she begins to get lonely in the old mansion. One day she discovers a garden and decides to make it beautiful again. Along the way, she manages to cure her sickly cousin Colin, who is every bit as imperious as she. These two are sullen children but Mary gives Collin courage. They are closed up in a gloomy old manor on the Yorkshire moors of England, until a locked-up garden captures their imaginations. The children also befriend the garnder boy. Throughout the book it is Mary's desire to get her uncle to love again and show affection towards his son. As new life sprouts from the earth, Mary and Colin's sour natures begin to sweeten. This book will change anybody who is afraid to love.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
By all means look for the edition with the Tasha Tudor illustrations. This is a perfect book, one of my favorites ever. How can you resist a book that contains a hidden, neglected garden, and has a heroine who is far from sweet and prim and biddable?read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I read this book as a young girl. It is filled with all kinds of adventures for children and young adults. The story of the secret garden captures readers. The author has an expansive imagination. The story is about friendship and teaches lesson in perseverance and determination.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a wonderful book about Mary's growth. At the beginning of the story she was a much spoiled child and selfish. However after she moved to England, she changed into a very kind girl thanks to the fresh air, grass filled with flowers and a secret gerden.I was moved to read this book because she was actually very pure and changed dramatically. I like this story the best of all English books that I have read before.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I finally read this book, after having always wanting too.As a child, I remember going to see the 1993 film and I have always loved that. Perhaps that is what kept me from reading it so much, having loved the film so much I suppose I saw no need to read the book.I am glad I have read it now, more then glad as it is a lovely, sweet and beautifully written book. I thought it was going to be more childish, but in fact it is not. It is a pity they do not also publish this book as an adult book as well because despite it being about young children I think it will also be enjoyed by older people as well. It was a lovely, light hearted book, one that grows in you and makes you want to read more and more. It has a good message and a good moral story though without being too pushy or overly religious as I feared. It has made me long to go to Yorkshire though, and see the moors and listen to the beautiful accent they have up there. I wonder though, if it it is as strong as it must have been in the past.I was also thinking as I read this, that at the time of publication my grandma would have been too. I don't know why I come to think of such a strange unrelated thing. But that is what life - in a way - must have been like when my grandma was a baby - the clothes and the ways of life. I remember seeing this for the first time but I can't remember if my grandma was there with us or not - we had seen her on that day.I love reading classics for the fact that they were written for the people of that day and not us. The Secret Garden was a book my grandma or her siblings may have read when it wasn't quite yet a classic. I think all books have a time and place and the meaning and the way you read it changes even though the book itself does not. Hmm, that's slightly off on a tangent I know but it makes me curious I suppose, as to how differently perhaps we read a book - or how a book is written, in relation to the time and period.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Frances Hodgson Burnett's The Secret Garden is the classic tale of Mary Lennox, her cousin, Colin Craven, and a local Yorkshire boy, Dickon Sowerby as they discover a secret garden at Misselthwaite Manor, and make it come alive with love and Magic.The Secret Garden is one of my favorite books of all time. Burnett's writing is lush and magical, and sucks you into the Victorian England world in which it is set. One of my favorite things about the book is the way in which she writes the Yorkshire dialect. Much like Zora Neale Hurston in Their Eyes Were Watching God, Burnett writes the dialect the way it is spoken so that you can really get a feel for the language itself.As far as the story, I absolutely love the way Burnett writes Mary and Dickon. From the transformation that Mary has to the way that Dickon charms the flora and fauna, it is all so innocent and dreamlike. Colin, on the other hand, is kind of annoying and I don't like how the focus switches to his transformation at the expense of really wrapping up Mary's. Mary is the one who was immediately wanting for family and a place of her own, and yet the story ends with Colin being the one who gets it. For example, Mary had always been obsessed with the Sowerby family, but when Mrs. Sowerby finally arrives to see the children, Colin is the one who she gives hugs to and who makes her misty-eyed. It just seemed that Mary sacrificed her own wants and happiness for Colin in the end. Granted, being that selfless was part of her transformation, but you really come to love her and root for her, and I just felt that her ending was unsatisfied.I recommend this to children and adults alike who want a little Magic in their lives. Even with the unsatisfying resolution for Mary, I give this novel five stars!read more
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This was one of my very favorite books when I was a child, and I still reread it and love it today. There's enough magic and wonder in the garden to satisfy the most finicky of young readers, and enough love and lessons learned to recommend it to the adult reader as well. This is a beautiful book that has stood the test of time.read more
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I really enjoyed this book at the beginning, the talk about magic was a little repetitive to me at times. I would recommend this book however as a good read.read more
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A beautiful story about friendship, emotional walls, and family. One of my favorites.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read this years ago and LOVED it. And much of it stayed with me. An absolutely sweet and beautiful tale. Need to read it again, especially now, as it starts off sad but quickly becomes positive, healing -- for both the characters and readers --and simply wonderful. Children can teach us so much!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Secret Garden is a classic book which every now and then I still pick up to read, just because it is a sweet story with morals that aren't terribly overbearing. It is one that I have and will continue to pass along to others.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A sweet story of two children who discover the healing powers of nature and a pleasant attitude. The style of writing (c1911) is very descriptive and the author's point is made repetitively. The Yorkshire dialect could be difficult for juvenile readers but the concept of getting out and enjoying nature is appropriate for today's culture.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I was pleased nearly beyond measure when I saw this audio on my library's list. I love listening to books as I fall asleep. It's difficult to listen to new books, though, as I lose track of my place. Books I know and love are what I like best for bedtime, and this is a book I know nearly by heart.

Revisiting it now, I find it prefigures so many of my other favorites- I hear echoes of Roethke, I see a glimpse of Sam Gamgee in his old age, I think of Alec Ramsey in his heady rush of freedom riding a wild stallion into his future, I see Emily Webb trying to talk to the living, and young Gerry Durrell peering into the heart of a rose to see the spider change color.

I found this book so long ago I have no memory of a time I didn't know it. My childhood was full of gardens, and I yearned for a secret garden of my own. I found the loving descriptions of weeding and pruning comforting and full of continuity. I loved watching the waking of the garden and of Mary and Colin.

One of the things I love most about this book is the way in which it lovingly delineates all the different ways the characters come alive. That's one of the things that makes it timeless- I could read it at 9 and identify with Mary, at 14 with Dickon, at 30 with Susan. Now, it's Ben Weatherstaff, marveling at the springing life and beauty around him, failing utterly to hold back tears and wearing a grumpy face despite his soaring heart.

Perhaps of my favorite passage, one that springs to mind when I'm slack-jawed and full of wonder, often in the garden:

"One of the strange things about living in the world is that it is only now and then one is quite sure one is going to live forever and ever and ever. One knows it sometimes when one gets up at the tender solemn dawn-time and goes out and stands alone and throws one’s head far back and looks up and up and watches the pale sky slowly changing and flushing and marvelous unknown things happening until the East almost makes one cry out and one’s heart stands still at the strange unchanging majesty of the rising of the sun–which has been happening every morning for thousands and thousands and thousands of years. One knows it then for a moment or so. And one knows it sometimes when one stands by oneself in a wood at sunset and the mysterious deep gold stillness slanting through and under the branches seems to be saying slowly again and again something one cannot quite hear, however much one tries. Then sometimes the immense quiet of the dark blue at night with millions of stars waiting and watching makes one sure; and sometimes a sound of far-off music makes it true; and sometimes a look in some one’s eyes."read more
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It's no surprise that I liked this book. A Little Princess, also by Burnett, has been one of my favorite comfort reads for many years. I loved the movie of The Secret Garden growing up, and I have seen and frequently listen to the soundtrack of the musical.No, the surprising thing is simply that I've never read it before.As with A Little Princess, The Secret Garden is a sweet book, with lovely writing. Even what could be major disasters - the cholera in India, Mary's bad manners and temper and Colin's as well - are written so beautifully that there's no real sense of menace. The store is moved along by little mysteries - can Mary adapt to her new life? Can she find a way into the garden? What is the crying she hears and why doesn't anyone acknowledge it? And so on.It was great to read the book having just listened to the musical. There are lines, especially dialogue, that are pulled straight out of the text, and although there are minor differences in the plot (for example, in the book, Mary's father is Mr. Craven's wife's sibling, and in the musical it is Mary's mother), the musical captures the story well.read more
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I felt a little bit difficult for me.But I was able to enjoy this book.The noble figure of Mary was struck me.The scene was also very impressed to see the garden in their eyes colin.Unfortunately I can not express well, I think this book has very warm atmosphere.read more
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I read this because one of my 101/1001 challenges is to re-read 10 of my favourite books from my childhood. This one would have to be very near the top of that list. Mary Lenox, a sour and spoiled young girl, is sent to live at her uncle's house on the Yorkshire moors following the death of her parents in India. While there, she meets and befriends Dickon, a boy who spends most of his time outdoors, talking to animals, taking care of birds, etc. Mary learns how to enjoy the outdoors, and grows interested in gardening. She and Dickon find an overgrown 'secret' garden which belonged to Mary's uncle's late wife. Meanwhile, they meet Colin, Mary's invalid cousin. The three children set about bringing the neglected garden back to life and, along the way, Mary and Colin blossom. It's all quite sappy, all about growth, love, rebirth, etc., but it never fails to make me smile. And it did make me remember how I felt the very first time I read it, which was a wonderful thing.read more
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A wonderful book of philosophy for young people. Three youngsters have discovered an amazing truth by "scientific" experiment. A truth hard to believe, because it is always the same story: At first people refuse to believe, then they begin to hope it can be done, finally it is done. In the end, everybody wonders why it was not done before. Thoughts are as powerful as electrical batteries - "as good for one as sunlight is, or as bad for one as poison. To let a sad thought or a bad one get into your mind is as dangerous as letting a scarlet fever germ get into your body." So, you must either accept positive thinking or let negative thoughts pull you down. There is no alternative, go for the better one.Heinz-Gerd Küsterread more
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A fun interactive book For middle schoolars I am a fast reader so some people might think this a long book.read more
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A reread of a book I adored as a child.



Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
the book is very intersting and thrilling.recommended to read the book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Heart-warming story about a young boy who was believed to be too sick to go outside, and how his friendship with a young girl helped him more than medicine. A good book to teach the value of friends, health, and how to develop a plot when writing.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
After the sudden death of her parents, Mary Lennox is sent from their home in India to the distant English estate of a family friend. Sad and lonely, her only interest lies in a secret garden, abandoned after a tragic accident occurred there. With the help of Dickon, and engaging local boy, and Colin, her guardian's invalid son, Mary's spirit is gradually reawakened as they bring the garden back to life. 108 min
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A longtime favorite of mine, and now my daughters are coming to love it. The story of an orphaned girl who is sent to England to live in a huge manor house on the moors with her absentee uncle. She comes to befriend her bedridden cousing and a magical Yorkshire boy. The children find a secret garden that works its magic on all three of them and changes them forever. The "secret" aspect of the garden, which becomes a special place for the child characters away from grownups, is very appealing to chldren.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
My love of the Gothic genre started here, in sixth grade when I found this book in the school library. It made me love books.I still remember that wistful feeling after I'd read the last page and closed the book...
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read as a child, reread as an adult. Understood the message better as an adult (although ti was a little unsubtle at times!) but still enjoyed it.Orphaned Mary returns to England from India, where she has been spoilt rotten by her now dead parents and servants.She now lives, seemingly alone, in a large, rambling house where the servants are too busy to do everything for her, and soon has to learn that she needs to make her own entertainment. Exercise outdoors soon begins to improve her health, making her less sallow, but stronger. She makes friends with both the old gardener and a robin, the latter breaking the secret place of "The Secret Garden". The garden was locked up on the death of her unknown aunt - she has yet to meet her uncle, who has been off wondering the world since the death of his wife.She also becomes friends with Dicken, the brother of one of the housemaids and between them they start bringing the garden back to life.Mary then finds out that she's not the only child in the house. Her cousin Colin is confined to bed, either because of, or resulting in him being a sick, weakly bad tempered child. In secret, mary and Dicken take Colin to the secret garden and with attention, fresh air, exercise and the right food, Colin begins to gain his strength. Both he and Mary learn to share and be less pampered and stand up for themselves and what is right.Colin's father returns to find Colin fit and healthy, running around. The Garden is open and nearly back to it's original state. He learns that perhaps he should lock things away (including looking after his son).
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A uplifting story of a sullen child who becomes a better person through finding and cultivating the garden of the title. The story is also about the redemption of at least two other characters. I wasn't clear why everyone was so afraid of Colin, initially a weak and helpless ten year old. Quite good to read as a counterbalance to some of the serious stuff I have been reading.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is an illustrated version and it is a treasure. It also contains the complete story, not just an abbreviated version, which is bonus.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
You need a secret garden of your own to read this in.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Mini Book Review: I was disappointed when I first started the book as I heard so many fabulous things about this classic. I almost gave up after about 30 pages as it was hard to read about a child who was just utterly unlikeable (and yes I can see how she bacame that way) But than something happened about 45 pages in I started falling in love with her and wanted to know more. Such a charming, beautiful story and I now know why so many people list this as one of their favorite stories. Since I have to get 3 reviews done by New Years Eve (Tomorrow) this is going to be a quickie review. Fabulous character development and wonderful use of setting. You felt like you knew these characters and let me tell you the whole time I was reading, I also imagined that I was on the moors with the children. As a child this would be a truly marvelous read. As an adult my only negative comments would be that some might stop reading because at the beginning Mary is so unlikeable. Also the ending is a tad saccharine and predictable - but I really didn't mind that as I am a big softie. To put it simply it is a lovely sweet innocent tale of the importance of play, good fresh air and the power of imagination.4.5 Dewey'sI purchased this at the Indigo at the Eaton Centre for my BBC 100 Top Books Challenge (Yeah I totally failed I only finished 2 of the 5 I was going to review - but hey I moved across the country and became at stay at home mom)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Had this read to me when I was 8 or 9 by my teacher. She was English so was able to get all the accents right in the story and bought it alive. Bought my own copy as an adult and read it again and it was still as good as I remembered. A classic
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
After mistress Mary is sent to live with her uncle after her mother dies she begins to get lonely in the old mansion. One day she discovers a garden and decides to make it beautiful again. Along the way, she manages to cure her sickly cousin Colin, who is every bit as imperious as she. These two are sullen children but Mary gives Collin courage. They are closed up in a gloomy old manor on the Yorkshire moors of England, until a locked-up garden captures their imaginations. The children also befriend the garnder boy. Throughout the book it is Mary's desire to get her uncle to love again and show affection towards his son. As new life sprouts from the earth, Mary and Colin's sour natures begin to sweeten. This book will change anybody who is afraid to love.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
By all means look for the edition with the Tasha Tudor illustrations. This is a perfect book, one of my favorites ever. How can you resist a book that contains a hidden, neglected garden, and has a heroine who is far from sweet and prim and biddable?
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I read this book as a young girl. It is filled with all kinds of adventures for children and young adults. The story of the secret garden captures readers. The author has an expansive imagination. The story is about friendship and teaches lesson in perseverance and determination.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a wonderful book about Mary's growth. At the beginning of the story she was a much spoiled child and selfish. However after she moved to England, she changed into a very kind girl thanks to the fresh air, grass filled with flowers and a secret gerden.I was moved to read this book because she was actually very pure and changed dramatically. I like this story the best of all English books that I have read before.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I finally read this book, after having always wanting too.As a child, I remember going to see the 1993 film and I have always loved that. Perhaps that is what kept me from reading it so much, having loved the film so much I suppose I saw no need to read the book.I am glad I have read it now, more then glad as it is a lovely, sweet and beautifully written book. I thought it was going to be more childish, but in fact it is not. It is a pity they do not also publish this book as an adult book as well because despite it being about young children I think it will also be enjoyed by older people as well. It was a lovely, light hearted book, one that grows in you and makes you want to read more and more. It has a good message and a good moral story though without being too pushy or overly religious as I feared. It has made me long to go to Yorkshire though, and see the moors and listen to the beautiful accent they have up there. I wonder though, if it it is as strong as it must have been in the past.I was also thinking as I read this, that at the time of publication my grandma would have been too. I don't know why I come to think of such a strange unrelated thing. But that is what life - in a way - must have been like when my grandma was a baby - the clothes and the ways of life. I remember seeing this for the first time but I can't remember if my grandma was there with us or not - we had seen her on that day.I love reading classics for the fact that they were written for the people of that day and not us. The Secret Garden was a book my grandma or her siblings may have read when it wasn't quite yet a classic. I think all books have a time and place and the meaning and the way you read it changes even though the book itself does not. Hmm, that's slightly off on a tangent I know but it makes me curious I suppose, as to how differently perhaps we read a book - or how a book is written, in relation to the time and period.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Frances Hodgson Burnett's The Secret Garden is the classic tale of Mary Lennox, her cousin, Colin Craven, and a local Yorkshire boy, Dickon Sowerby as they discover a secret garden at Misselthwaite Manor, and make it come alive with love and Magic.The Secret Garden is one of my favorite books of all time. Burnett's writing is lush and magical, and sucks you into the Victorian England world in which it is set. One of my favorite things about the book is the way in which she writes the Yorkshire dialect. Much like Zora Neale Hurston in Their Eyes Were Watching God, Burnett writes the dialect the way it is spoken so that you can really get a feel for the language itself.As far as the story, I absolutely love the way Burnett writes Mary and Dickon. From the transformation that Mary has to the way that Dickon charms the flora and fauna, it is all so innocent and dreamlike. Colin, on the other hand, is kind of annoying and I don't like how the focus switches to his transformation at the expense of really wrapping up Mary's. Mary is the one who was immediately wanting for family and a place of her own, and yet the story ends with Colin being the one who gets it. For example, Mary had always been obsessed with the Sowerby family, but when Mrs. Sowerby finally arrives to see the children, Colin is the one who she gives hugs to and who makes her misty-eyed. It just seemed that Mary sacrificed her own wants and happiness for Colin in the end. Granted, being that selfless was part of her transformation, but you really come to love her and root for her, and I just felt that her ending was unsatisfied.I recommend this to children and adults alike who want a little Magic in their lives. Even with the unsatisfying resolution for Mary, I give this novel five stars!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was one of my very favorite books when I was a child, and I still reread it and love it today. There's enough magic and wonder in the garden to satisfy the most finicky of young readers, and enough love and lessons learned to recommend it to the adult reader as well. This is a beautiful book that has stood the test of time.
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I really enjoyed this book at the beginning, the talk about magic was a little repetitive to me at times. I would recommend this book however as a good read.
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A beautiful story about friendship, emotional walls, and family. One of my favorites.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read this years ago and LOVED it. And much of it stayed with me. An absolutely sweet and beautiful tale. Need to read it again, especially now, as it starts off sad but quickly becomes positive, healing -- for both the characters and readers --and simply wonderful. Children can teach us so much!
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The Secret Garden is a classic book which every now and then I still pick up to read, just because it is a sweet story with morals that aren't terribly overbearing. It is one that I have and will continue to pass along to others.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A sweet story of two children who discover the healing powers of nature and a pleasant attitude. The style of writing (c1911) is very descriptive and the author's point is made repetitively. The Yorkshire dialect could be difficult for juvenile readers but the concept of getting out and enjoying nature is appropriate for today's culture.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I was pleased nearly beyond measure when I saw this audio on my library's list. I love listening to books as I fall asleep. It's difficult to listen to new books, though, as I lose track of my place. Books I know and love are what I like best for bedtime, and this is a book I know nearly by heart.

Revisiting it now, I find it prefigures so many of my other favorites- I hear echoes of Roethke, I see a glimpse of Sam Gamgee in his old age, I think of Alec Ramsey in his heady rush of freedom riding a wild stallion into his future, I see Emily Webb trying to talk to the living, and young Gerry Durrell peering into the heart of a rose to see the spider change color.

I found this book so long ago I have no memory of a time I didn't know it. My childhood was full of gardens, and I yearned for a secret garden of my own. I found the loving descriptions of weeding and pruning comforting and full of continuity. I loved watching the waking of the garden and of Mary and Colin.

One of the things I love most about this book is the way in which it lovingly delineates all the different ways the characters come alive. That's one of the things that makes it timeless- I could read it at 9 and identify with Mary, at 14 with Dickon, at 30 with Susan. Now, it's Ben Weatherstaff, marveling at the springing life and beauty around him, failing utterly to hold back tears and wearing a grumpy face despite his soaring heart.

Perhaps of my favorite passage, one that springs to mind when I'm slack-jawed and full of wonder, often in the garden:

"One of the strange things about living in the world is that it is only now and then one is quite sure one is going to live forever and ever and ever. One knows it sometimes when one gets up at the tender solemn dawn-time and goes out and stands alone and throws one’s head far back and looks up and up and watches the pale sky slowly changing and flushing and marvelous unknown things happening until the East almost makes one cry out and one’s heart stands still at the strange unchanging majesty of the rising of the sun–which has been happening every morning for thousands and thousands and thousands of years. One knows it then for a moment or so. And one knows it sometimes when one stands by oneself in a wood at sunset and the mysterious deep gold stillness slanting through and under the branches seems to be saying slowly again and again something one cannot quite hear, however much one tries. Then sometimes the immense quiet of the dark blue at night with millions of stars waiting and watching makes one sure; and sometimes a sound of far-off music makes it true; and sometimes a look in some one’s eyes."
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It's no surprise that I liked this book. A Little Princess, also by Burnett, has been one of my favorite comfort reads for many years. I loved the movie of The Secret Garden growing up, and I have seen and frequently listen to the soundtrack of the musical.No, the surprising thing is simply that I've never read it before.As with A Little Princess, The Secret Garden is a sweet book, with lovely writing. Even what could be major disasters - the cholera in India, Mary's bad manners and temper and Colin's as well - are written so beautifully that there's no real sense of menace. The store is moved along by little mysteries - can Mary adapt to her new life? Can she find a way into the garden? What is the crying she hears and why doesn't anyone acknowledge it? And so on.It was great to read the book having just listened to the musical. There are lines, especially dialogue, that are pulled straight out of the text, and although there are minor differences in the plot (for example, in the book, Mary's father is Mr. Craven's wife's sibling, and in the musical it is Mary's mother), the musical captures the story well.
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I felt a little bit difficult for me.But I was able to enjoy this book.The noble figure of Mary was struck me.The scene was also very impressed to see the garden in their eyes colin.Unfortunately I can not express well, I think this book has very warm atmosphere.
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I read this because one of my 101/1001 challenges is to re-read 10 of my favourite books from my childhood. This one would have to be very near the top of that list. Mary Lenox, a sour and spoiled young girl, is sent to live at her uncle's house on the Yorkshire moors following the death of her parents in India. While there, she meets and befriends Dickon, a boy who spends most of his time outdoors, talking to animals, taking care of birds, etc. Mary learns how to enjoy the outdoors, and grows interested in gardening. She and Dickon find an overgrown 'secret' garden which belonged to Mary's uncle's late wife. Meanwhile, they meet Colin, Mary's invalid cousin. The three children set about bringing the neglected garden back to life and, along the way, Mary and Colin blossom. It's all quite sappy, all about growth, love, rebirth, etc., but it never fails to make me smile. And it did make me remember how I felt the very first time I read it, which was a wonderful thing.
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A wonderful book of philosophy for young people. Three youngsters have discovered an amazing truth by "scientific" experiment. A truth hard to believe, because it is always the same story: At first people refuse to believe, then they begin to hope it can be done, finally it is done. In the end, everybody wonders why it was not done before. Thoughts are as powerful as electrical batteries - "as good for one as sunlight is, or as bad for one as poison. To let a sad thought or a bad one get into your mind is as dangerous as letting a scarlet fever germ get into your body." So, you must either accept positive thinking or let negative thoughts pull you down. There is no alternative, go for the better one.Heinz-Gerd Küster
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A fun interactive book For middle schoolars I am a fast reader so some people might think this a long book.
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