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First published in 1903, The Call of the Wild is regarded as Jack London's masterpiece. Based on London's experiences as a gold prospector in the Canadian wilderness and his ideas about nature and the struggle for existence, The Call of the Wild is a tale about unbreakable spirit and the fight for survival in the frozen Alaskan Klondike.
Published: Aladdin on
ISBN: 9781442457560
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For some reason, though I had it when I was little, I never read White Fang. I think I was afraid of anthropomorphism. I figured it was going to be kind of cutesy, not really worth my time. Much as I liked Narnia and the like, in fiction based in the real world, I wanted more realism. I obviously never even started reading it. I think the book does a good job of portraying the wolf as a completely different creature from the human -- as well as a human can do without becoming a wolf for a while himself. The slow taming of White Fang seemed more or less realistic to me, and my heart was in my mouth in the last couple of pages. The book does make you care about the characters, particularly White Fang and his final master.

I was especially intrigued by the idea of wolves/dogs seeing humans as their gods. White Fang's view of his gods reminded me of the ancient Greek pantheon -- all those jealous and fighting gods, some more powerful than others...

I'm glad I finally did read this book.more
A classic by Jack London, White Fang could be considered the companion to London’s Call of the Wild, except in reserve. Whereas Buck from Call of the Wild finds his wild nature—White Fang finds his human love and is able to integrate into domestic life. White Fang is born in the wild to a wolf father and a half wolf mother. When he is made captive by humans, he is outcast from the other dogs because of his wildness. He learns to fight for his life. Finally, he has an opportunity to experience a new life away from the violence and savagery—but will he learn to embrace it is the question. I loved this book despite the violence and the brutality of the life led by White Fang—and the cruelty of the humans he encounters. A 4 out of 5 stars.more
I first read this book when I was a young teenager. I remember crying then. I didn’t cry this time round but the actions in this book did strike a chord with me. I really do detest cruelty to animals; the cruelty in this book is paramount.White Fang is a product of his past. He has been taught to hate. He has been taught to survive at any measure. He is vicious. He is a killer! Yet he’s these things because he has to be. His other choice is to be the weak link and die.It’s a powerful story. Well told. No holding back; aimed straight for the jugular. The biggest lesson learned by reading White Fang is that you can beat an animal (and I believe this relates to people too) into doing what you want but loving them produces a much better (long-lasting) result. A beaten animal will do as you want, but will rip your throat out if given the opportunity. A loved animal will be faithful, loyal and forever.There’s little more to be said about this book except that it’s worth reading. I highly recommend it.more
Book ReviewBy: Evan MercadoThis is a classic story about survival (in my eyes). This starts off interesting with a pack of 6 wolfs, and ends up with, well, you have to read the book for that :). It ends up in a good home after attacking it's owner's family. No one knows for sure, but the other wolfs might still be alive. Only 1 dies that I know of) the rest (except for 1 who goes solo) and they travel in a pack of 4. That until they came across this tribe of Indians (I called them Indians because in the book they were called Indians, if that offends anyone).Thats when one wolf turns on the rest of it’s pack, and leaves. It found a home, owner , until a Dog Musher wants this dog. But the owner (Scott) keeps the dog and moves to Sierra Vista, with his family.more
Though I responded with boyish enthusiasm to 'The Call of the Wild' many years ago and it re-echoes in memory, I had not read 'White Fang' or any of London's other books until now. I don't think 'White Fang' quite compares with its companion novel stylistically - the later chapters in particular are too obviously allegorical and predictable - but it is equally rugged, energetic and thrilling. London excels at seeing the world through the dog wolf's eyes, and he also manages the difficult and necessary task of shifting the narrative viewpoint occasionally to move the story along at critical points. He is least successful with his human portrayals, especially the dialogue which reads as if it has been written on cardboard with too thick a pen, but he is entirely at home in the Yukon where it stands on the cusp between traditional existence and 'civilisation' in the trail of the gold rush. His evocation of the animal and human struggles in these harsh surroundings - with very survival constantly under threat - is supremely vivid and vital, inked as it were in blood.more
White Fang is a very good book which I recommend to 4th grade and higher readers. I think anybody would love to read this action-packed book!!!!!!!!more
Having only a cursory knowledge of London's work, I decided to choose White Fang first when considering which public domain works to record as audio books. I've only "read" it once, but have listened to it probably a half-dozen more times in the editing process. It's very well written, accessible, and very involved. At no time did I feel as if London was writing without a clear purpose and passion. Excellent read and rather timeless. As a side note, there are some very decent young adult versions with illustrations and even one with a sidebar defining more complex words. Very useful for young readers.more
Jack London imports Social Darwinist credo, used more clumsily and less divertingly by authors such as Frank Norris, into letters with fervor, conviction, and skill. We encounter White Fang, a part domestic dog and mostly wolf dog that lives with a pack in the wilderness and whose mother had once been domesticated by the Native Americans. As in the case of its companion volume, "Call of the Wild," (where the dog Buck moves from domesticity to the wild, as opposed to vice versa), White Fang has abusive owners who want White Fang to fight for money, but White Fang is rescued by a man who is called, under the regime of London's casually assumed racism, one of the "white human gods." A great tale, and a book that serves as an excellent introduction to literature for young adolescents, bit can be relished at all ages.more
I bought this book at a book fair at school when I was nine. I cannot tell how many times I have read it. As a child, I mainly read it for the 'wolf' story, but as an adult, I have appreciated the deeper aspects of the writing. London was big on analyzing why people do what they do, not always correct imo. It's still a good read, forget the movie(s).more
This is an amazing book, highly addictive. I just couldn’t put it down. Jack London writes with detail and emotion!The story’s about a wolf named White Fang and its life through the hands of many masters. This is one of those books that transports you to another place and time while you’re reading it - a real time machine. And since it’s always told from the wolf’s point of view, sometimes it made me remember the National Geographic TV documentaries I watched in awe when I was a child.It also focuses on the man-animal relationship, and how the environment and society shape spirits and behaviours.After reading it I learned that this book is a companion novel for Jack London’s most famous novel, “Call of the Wild”, in which a dog becomes wild again, in contrast to White Fang, a wolf that becomes domesticated.more
This is the story of White Fang - 3/4 wolf and 1/4 dog. It tells of White Fangs parentage, his birth, his early days in the wild, his meeting with men and learning to live with them, of his meeting with white men and learning to live with them. Along the way, he learns some terribly hard lessons, and also learns some great joys as well.more
I loved this book. It chronicles the life of a wolf(half dog) through the harse wilderness, brutal treatment at the hand of man, and then ultimately friendship and love. The book is written from the aspect of the wolf. Truly a great book. Highly recommend for dog lovers!more
Not as good as Call of the Wild, but still one of Jack London's best books.more
White Fang is the story of a wolf, the likes of which has never been heard of before. It takes place in Yukon Territory, Canada, and follows the life of White Fang, a crossbreed of wolf and dog, through the many twists and turns that make a story memorable. White Fang begins his life in a small cave, with very little more than a mother and an instinct: Survive. Following a chance encounter with Grey Beaver, an Indian that was once his mother’s master, his life begins to change drastically. Once a young wolf struggling to learn the ways of the wild, then a furious devil in awe of the power of man, White Fang struggles with conflicts. When he is bought by Beauty Smith, a coward with a brutal nature, and made to fight in an arena against other animals, his rage only worsens. Then he is rescued from certain death by Weedon Scott, the son of an influential Judge, and his life begins to take a turn for the better. But can White Fang overcome his killer instinct and lead a different life? One of Love, instead of hate?White Fang is one of the best books I have read for a long time. Once I picked it up, it was truly impossible to put it down again. Every page I turned only made me more curious as to how the story would end. Like Call of the Wild, Jack London has worked his magic again. A truly memorable read.more
I don't think I've ever read such an offensive, disturbing book in my life. I've never encountered a book with so much violence, nor have I ever read a book that so clearly advocated for violence on every front. I have no idea why this book is geared towards children??? I would NEVER give my child this book.On top of that, I don't think enough people pay attention to what a flagrant racist London was. For example, "Those white gods [white men] were strong. They possessed greater mastery over matter than the gods [Native Americans White Fang] had known, most powerful among which was Grey Beaver [a Native American]. And yet Grey Beaver was a child-god among these white-skinned ones" (162).Beyond this, London is unendingly pessimistic and depressing. He has a horrendously ugly worldview in which the world is "a chaos of gluttony and slaughter, ruled over by chance, merciless, planless, endless" (90). And he is incredibly disrespectful towards religion -- I'm not a particularly religious person, but even I was offended.However, after reading this book, I would have to say I am thankful for a few things. First, I am thankful I never have to read this book again or be curious about it or get snookered into reading another London text. Second, I am thankful tenfold for the fact that I will never know Jack London. I have never disliked an author more and I will never read another London book as long as I live. Half a star is too good for this book.more
If you have kids you are trying to interest in reading more, White Fang is a great book suggestion. Especially if they are boys yes go ahead call me sexist. The story is gripping. the language is gripping, and London paints a scene like no one else. It's a book that kids can understand, but it is not a kids book, which I bet your children or nephews or nieces or whatnot will appreciate.more
Powerfully written and heart wrenching. The story of an abused wolf-dog- beat, abandoned, and only let loose in a dog fight ring. Made vicious and wary of all, but still going strong, waiting for a kind heart.more
I love this book. I have read this upwards of 20 times, and it never gets old! His description of wolves is almost magical. Very interesting perspective and easy to read.more
I think I tried to read this book when I was a lot younger and it just didn’t do anything for me. I got bored and ended up putting it down before I really gave it a chance. This time, however, I got hooked. In fact, I read more than half of it in one afternoon. The tale of White Fang is many things: intense, sad, funny, depressing, and happy. You’ll run the whole gamut of emotions with this story.The story is set in the late 1800s when the Wild was really wild and life was much tougher for men and animals alike. London gives us a nice back story – before we even meet White Fang we meet his mother and learn about her cunning and her past. When White Fang is born, we see through his eyes and discover the cold and dangerous Arctic along with him. We learn that man is godlike in his way to control things both dead and alive and that while man means food and shelter, he also means pain and discipline. White Fang must learn to adapt to two worlds, that of the Wild and his inner wolf, and the world of humans where he must find his inner dog. I won’t give anything away, but throughout the story you’re also torn between wanting him to live in the Wild and wanting him to find love in the human world.This is a great, short read for a summer afternoon or two. Read it when it’s too hot to do anything outside and you’ll be transported to the cold Arctic for a few hours. I understand now why this book has become a classic. The story of White Fang is unforgettable and touches the heart.5 out of 5 stars because this has quickly become one of my favorite books.more
A strange, strange book. But powerful.more
This story follows the life of White Fang who is part dog and part wolf from puppyhood to maturity. The descriptive writing by the author is poetic and extensive to illustrate the interactive dynamics in White Fang's life. The reader is drawn into White Fang's impressions and thoughts as he moves through the brutality and cruelty of his fellow canines and owners until he is rescued by Wendon Scott. The emotional learning from hatred to love is complex but the author is able to evolve these emotions with great expertise. The author's use of vocabulary is effective and picturesque. A wonderful read.!more
Avoided reading this for many years despite it being recommended by many. Guess the name suggested gory violence, and there is very little of that. The tale of this dog/wolf mix from puppy to adult is a loving, curious, sorrowful, and joyful adventure. The human/dog relationships depicted are realistic. A captivating read.more
White Fang is the story of wolf/dog who descend from Kiche, a wolf/dog who runs the wild in ??anartica? The story begins with two man traveling across the dark frozen tundra with 8 dogs a sled and a coffin. But the wolf continuously attacks all the dogs and the one man traveler. The wolf is then found by it's "owner" gray bear where White Fang grows up, learning to become a fighter to survive in the pack for food and for his life. The vocabulary and the writing style takes some time to get your mouth around. This is an intriguing and sometimes intense story, but not a fast read.more
I loved this book....I've read other books from the point of view of animals and they have all seemed to fall flat..but this book was so exciting and inciteful. I felt that the writer truly understood the canine mind. You absolutely fall in love with White Fang and want to stand up for him, cheer for him, or cry for him throughout the book...it's a heartwarming story.more
I drive a lot for work and get bored with listening to the radio after a while. A lot of times I'll listen to audiobooks but they're so expensive that I haven't listened to one in a while. So I was happily surprised when I found White Fang and The Call of the Wild on audio for $4 apiece at Half Price Books. If you are not familiar with this store, I am very sorry. It's absolutely wonderful (but not near as wonderful as our own Recycled Books here in Denton - I really love that store).So I remember reading The Call of the Wild when I was kid and I think I saw a movie on White Fang at some point in my life but they're both very fuzzy and needless to say I had the two confused in my head. Well, maybe not confused but merged is the better word. I had somehow remembered a wild half-wolf dog that was captured and tortured to fight other dogs then rescued and taught be a sled dog who eventually went back to the wild. Yeah. Just remember it had been a long time.After listening to the two back to back, I believe that The Call of the Wild is my favorite of the two simply because I'm not fond of the narrative in White Fang. The narrator keeps referring to people as "gods" in White Fangs eyes. Also, he sees power as coming from material possessions. This is a human qualification and I have never seen animals give deference to another animal because of possessions. They base power on strength. It is possible with some animals that the leader may have access to more food and other possessions but that is because he/she is ALREADY leader. Those things do not make the leader. So, because the wolf apparently sees materials possessions as power he sees white people as being superior to all others. See where I'm going here? Very irritating.Ok, here's another problem: inconsistency. I realize these are different stories but they both concern sled dogs at some point. In The Call of the Wild, the sled dogs regard the lead sled dog with deference and treat him as leader in all other aspects of life. In White Fang, the other dogs view the lead dog as running away from them and therefore a coward to be tormented. The lead dog must sit with the people in order to be protected. WHAT??!! I don't know anything about sledding but I know about dogs and this simply doesn't make sense. The Call of the Wild was written first so maybe he discovered something that I don't know about. I tried to find some other reviews to see if there was any mention of this but all I could find were school papers and descriptions of the book. Anyone know where I can find good critiques not written by 6th graders?Ok, so I didn't completely dislike White Fang. I was irritated by those things but the storyline is very good. I was surprised when I found out it was written after The Call of the Wild because it seems a little more rough. It reads like a first book, where The Call of the Wild seems more polished. In both books I really enjoyed the interplay between the main characters and the other dogs. The dogs seemed more real than the people. This makes complete sense, since the story is told from the point of view of the dog. The other dogs would be the ones that Buck and White Fang knew the best. London accomplishes this very well. I also enjoyed the exchange between Buck and Thornton and White Fang and Scott. Being an animal lover and having dogs all my life, I know the power of the love from an animal. I was impressed by how Scott won over White Fang. His devotion to Scott reminds me of my boyfriend's dog, Skillet, who treats Jeff as if he hung the moon and my dog, Loki, who treats me the same way. Both of these dogs were rescued also. There seems to be something that happens to a dog who is rescued and loved that makes them more devoted than a dog who comes to you as a puppy, like my other dog, Aurora. She obviously loves me and I love her very much but Loki and Skillet become visibly upset just being out of our presence. I was also impressed that Buck remained with Thornton even when he wanted to be free simply because he loved this man. Many people may say this is anthropomorphizing, that animals can't love like this. I say they have never given themselves to an animal enough to feel that love.more
I used to confuse this with London's "Call of the Wild," and stupidly so. White Fang is three times meaner than Buck ever became. Hee. Curious that London's pieces have become Young Adult classics over the years.more
An old childhood read. Good enough to keep me up most of the night to finish it. Rereading it is a nice stroll down memory lane.more
Eggs greed greed detmore
Read all 29 reviews

Reviews

For some reason, though I had it when I was little, I never read White Fang. I think I was afraid of anthropomorphism. I figured it was going to be kind of cutesy, not really worth my time. Much as I liked Narnia and the like, in fiction based in the real world, I wanted more realism. I obviously never even started reading it. I think the book does a good job of portraying the wolf as a completely different creature from the human -- as well as a human can do without becoming a wolf for a while himself. The slow taming of White Fang seemed more or less realistic to me, and my heart was in my mouth in the last couple of pages. The book does make you care about the characters, particularly White Fang and his final master.

I was especially intrigued by the idea of wolves/dogs seeing humans as their gods. White Fang's view of his gods reminded me of the ancient Greek pantheon -- all those jealous and fighting gods, some more powerful than others...

I'm glad I finally did read this book.more
A classic by Jack London, White Fang could be considered the companion to London’s Call of the Wild, except in reserve. Whereas Buck from Call of the Wild finds his wild nature—White Fang finds his human love and is able to integrate into domestic life. White Fang is born in the wild to a wolf father and a half wolf mother. When he is made captive by humans, he is outcast from the other dogs because of his wildness. He learns to fight for his life. Finally, he has an opportunity to experience a new life away from the violence and savagery—but will he learn to embrace it is the question. I loved this book despite the violence and the brutality of the life led by White Fang—and the cruelty of the humans he encounters. A 4 out of 5 stars.more
I first read this book when I was a young teenager. I remember crying then. I didn’t cry this time round but the actions in this book did strike a chord with me. I really do detest cruelty to animals; the cruelty in this book is paramount.White Fang is a product of his past. He has been taught to hate. He has been taught to survive at any measure. He is vicious. He is a killer! Yet he’s these things because he has to be. His other choice is to be the weak link and die.It’s a powerful story. Well told. No holding back; aimed straight for the jugular. The biggest lesson learned by reading White Fang is that you can beat an animal (and I believe this relates to people too) into doing what you want but loving them produces a much better (long-lasting) result. A beaten animal will do as you want, but will rip your throat out if given the opportunity. A loved animal will be faithful, loyal and forever.There’s little more to be said about this book except that it’s worth reading. I highly recommend it.more
Book ReviewBy: Evan MercadoThis is a classic story about survival (in my eyes). This starts off interesting with a pack of 6 wolfs, and ends up with, well, you have to read the book for that :). It ends up in a good home after attacking it's owner's family. No one knows for sure, but the other wolfs might still be alive. Only 1 dies that I know of) the rest (except for 1 who goes solo) and they travel in a pack of 4. That until they came across this tribe of Indians (I called them Indians because in the book they were called Indians, if that offends anyone).Thats when one wolf turns on the rest of it’s pack, and leaves. It found a home, owner , until a Dog Musher wants this dog. But the owner (Scott) keeps the dog and moves to Sierra Vista, with his family.more
Though I responded with boyish enthusiasm to 'The Call of the Wild' many years ago and it re-echoes in memory, I had not read 'White Fang' or any of London's other books until now. I don't think 'White Fang' quite compares with its companion novel stylistically - the later chapters in particular are too obviously allegorical and predictable - but it is equally rugged, energetic and thrilling. London excels at seeing the world through the dog wolf's eyes, and he also manages the difficult and necessary task of shifting the narrative viewpoint occasionally to move the story along at critical points. He is least successful with his human portrayals, especially the dialogue which reads as if it has been written on cardboard with too thick a pen, but he is entirely at home in the Yukon where it stands on the cusp between traditional existence and 'civilisation' in the trail of the gold rush. His evocation of the animal and human struggles in these harsh surroundings - with very survival constantly under threat - is supremely vivid and vital, inked as it were in blood.more
White Fang is a very good book which I recommend to 4th grade and higher readers. I think anybody would love to read this action-packed book!!!!!!!!more
Having only a cursory knowledge of London's work, I decided to choose White Fang first when considering which public domain works to record as audio books. I've only "read" it once, but have listened to it probably a half-dozen more times in the editing process. It's very well written, accessible, and very involved. At no time did I feel as if London was writing without a clear purpose and passion. Excellent read and rather timeless. As a side note, there are some very decent young adult versions with illustrations and even one with a sidebar defining more complex words. Very useful for young readers.more
Jack London imports Social Darwinist credo, used more clumsily and less divertingly by authors such as Frank Norris, into letters with fervor, conviction, and skill. We encounter White Fang, a part domestic dog and mostly wolf dog that lives with a pack in the wilderness and whose mother had once been domesticated by the Native Americans. As in the case of its companion volume, "Call of the Wild," (where the dog Buck moves from domesticity to the wild, as opposed to vice versa), White Fang has abusive owners who want White Fang to fight for money, but White Fang is rescued by a man who is called, under the regime of London's casually assumed racism, one of the "white human gods." A great tale, and a book that serves as an excellent introduction to literature for young adolescents, bit can be relished at all ages.more
I bought this book at a book fair at school when I was nine. I cannot tell how many times I have read it. As a child, I mainly read it for the 'wolf' story, but as an adult, I have appreciated the deeper aspects of the writing. London was big on analyzing why people do what they do, not always correct imo. It's still a good read, forget the movie(s).more
This is an amazing book, highly addictive. I just couldn’t put it down. Jack London writes with detail and emotion!The story’s about a wolf named White Fang and its life through the hands of many masters. This is one of those books that transports you to another place and time while you’re reading it - a real time machine. And since it’s always told from the wolf’s point of view, sometimes it made me remember the National Geographic TV documentaries I watched in awe when I was a child.It also focuses on the man-animal relationship, and how the environment and society shape spirits and behaviours.After reading it I learned that this book is a companion novel for Jack London’s most famous novel, “Call of the Wild”, in which a dog becomes wild again, in contrast to White Fang, a wolf that becomes domesticated.more
This is the story of White Fang - 3/4 wolf and 1/4 dog. It tells of White Fangs parentage, his birth, his early days in the wild, his meeting with men and learning to live with them, of his meeting with white men and learning to live with them. Along the way, he learns some terribly hard lessons, and also learns some great joys as well.more
I loved this book. It chronicles the life of a wolf(half dog) through the harse wilderness, brutal treatment at the hand of man, and then ultimately friendship and love. The book is written from the aspect of the wolf. Truly a great book. Highly recommend for dog lovers!more
Not as good as Call of the Wild, but still one of Jack London's best books.more
White Fang is the story of a wolf, the likes of which has never been heard of before. It takes place in Yukon Territory, Canada, and follows the life of White Fang, a crossbreed of wolf and dog, through the many twists and turns that make a story memorable. White Fang begins his life in a small cave, with very little more than a mother and an instinct: Survive. Following a chance encounter with Grey Beaver, an Indian that was once his mother’s master, his life begins to change drastically. Once a young wolf struggling to learn the ways of the wild, then a furious devil in awe of the power of man, White Fang struggles with conflicts. When he is bought by Beauty Smith, a coward with a brutal nature, and made to fight in an arena against other animals, his rage only worsens. Then he is rescued from certain death by Weedon Scott, the son of an influential Judge, and his life begins to take a turn for the better. But can White Fang overcome his killer instinct and lead a different life? One of Love, instead of hate?White Fang is one of the best books I have read for a long time. Once I picked it up, it was truly impossible to put it down again. Every page I turned only made me more curious as to how the story would end. Like Call of the Wild, Jack London has worked his magic again. A truly memorable read.more
I don't think I've ever read such an offensive, disturbing book in my life. I've never encountered a book with so much violence, nor have I ever read a book that so clearly advocated for violence on every front. I have no idea why this book is geared towards children??? I would NEVER give my child this book.On top of that, I don't think enough people pay attention to what a flagrant racist London was. For example, "Those white gods [white men] were strong. They possessed greater mastery over matter than the gods [Native Americans White Fang] had known, most powerful among which was Grey Beaver [a Native American]. And yet Grey Beaver was a child-god among these white-skinned ones" (162).Beyond this, London is unendingly pessimistic and depressing. He has a horrendously ugly worldview in which the world is "a chaos of gluttony and slaughter, ruled over by chance, merciless, planless, endless" (90). And he is incredibly disrespectful towards religion -- I'm not a particularly religious person, but even I was offended.However, after reading this book, I would have to say I am thankful for a few things. First, I am thankful I never have to read this book again or be curious about it or get snookered into reading another London text. Second, I am thankful tenfold for the fact that I will never know Jack London. I have never disliked an author more and I will never read another London book as long as I live. Half a star is too good for this book.more
If you have kids you are trying to interest in reading more, White Fang is a great book suggestion. Especially if they are boys yes go ahead call me sexist. The story is gripping. the language is gripping, and London paints a scene like no one else. It's a book that kids can understand, but it is not a kids book, which I bet your children or nephews or nieces or whatnot will appreciate.more
Powerfully written and heart wrenching. The story of an abused wolf-dog- beat, abandoned, and only let loose in a dog fight ring. Made vicious and wary of all, but still going strong, waiting for a kind heart.more
I love this book. I have read this upwards of 20 times, and it never gets old! His description of wolves is almost magical. Very interesting perspective and easy to read.more
I think I tried to read this book when I was a lot younger and it just didn’t do anything for me. I got bored and ended up putting it down before I really gave it a chance. This time, however, I got hooked. In fact, I read more than half of it in one afternoon. The tale of White Fang is many things: intense, sad, funny, depressing, and happy. You’ll run the whole gamut of emotions with this story.The story is set in the late 1800s when the Wild was really wild and life was much tougher for men and animals alike. London gives us a nice back story – before we even meet White Fang we meet his mother and learn about her cunning and her past. When White Fang is born, we see through his eyes and discover the cold and dangerous Arctic along with him. We learn that man is godlike in his way to control things both dead and alive and that while man means food and shelter, he also means pain and discipline. White Fang must learn to adapt to two worlds, that of the Wild and his inner wolf, and the world of humans where he must find his inner dog. I won’t give anything away, but throughout the story you’re also torn between wanting him to live in the Wild and wanting him to find love in the human world.This is a great, short read for a summer afternoon or two. Read it when it’s too hot to do anything outside and you’ll be transported to the cold Arctic for a few hours. I understand now why this book has become a classic. The story of White Fang is unforgettable and touches the heart.5 out of 5 stars because this has quickly become one of my favorite books.more
A strange, strange book. But powerful.more
This story follows the life of White Fang who is part dog and part wolf from puppyhood to maturity. The descriptive writing by the author is poetic and extensive to illustrate the interactive dynamics in White Fang's life. The reader is drawn into White Fang's impressions and thoughts as he moves through the brutality and cruelty of his fellow canines and owners until he is rescued by Wendon Scott. The emotional learning from hatred to love is complex but the author is able to evolve these emotions with great expertise. The author's use of vocabulary is effective and picturesque. A wonderful read.!more
Avoided reading this for many years despite it being recommended by many. Guess the name suggested gory violence, and there is very little of that. The tale of this dog/wolf mix from puppy to adult is a loving, curious, sorrowful, and joyful adventure. The human/dog relationships depicted are realistic. A captivating read.more
White Fang is the story of wolf/dog who descend from Kiche, a wolf/dog who runs the wild in ??anartica? The story begins with two man traveling across the dark frozen tundra with 8 dogs a sled and a coffin. But the wolf continuously attacks all the dogs and the one man traveler. The wolf is then found by it's "owner" gray bear where White Fang grows up, learning to become a fighter to survive in the pack for food and for his life. The vocabulary and the writing style takes some time to get your mouth around. This is an intriguing and sometimes intense story, but not a fast read.more
I loved this book....I've read other books from the point of view of animals and they have all seemed to fall flat..but this book was so exciting and inciteful. I felt that the writer truly understood the canine mind. You absolutely fall in love with White Fang and want to stand up for him, cheer for him, or cry for him throughout the book...it's a heartwarming story.more
I drive a lot for work and get bored with listening to the radio after a while. A lot of times I'll listen to audiobooks but they're so expensive that I haven't listened to one in a while. So I was happily surprised when I found White Fang and The Call of the Wild on audio for $4 apiece at Half Price Books. If you are not familiar with this store, I am very sorry. It's absolutely wonderful (but not near as wonderful as our own Recycled Books here in Denton - I really love that store).So I remember reading The Call of the Wild when I was kid and I think I saw a movie on White Fang at some point in my life but they're both very fuzzy and needless to say I had the two confused in my head. Well, maybe not confused but merged is the better word. I had somehow remembered a wild half-wolf dog that was captured and tortured to fight other dogs then rescued and taught be a sled dog who eventually went back to the wild. Yeah. Just remember it had been a long time.After listening to the two back to back, I believe that The Call of the Wild is my favorite of the two simply because I'm not fond of the narrative in White Fang. The narrator keeps referring to people as "gods" in White Fangs eyes. Also, he sees power as coming from material possessions. This is a human qualification and I have never seen animals give deference to another animal because of possessions. They base power on strength. It is possible with some animals that the leader may have access to more food and other possessions but that is because he/she is ALREADY leader. Those things do not make the leader. So, because the wolf apparently sees materials possessions as power he sees white people as being superior to all others. See where I'm going here? Very irritating.Ok, here's another problem: inconsistency. I realize these are different stories but they both concern sled dogs at some point. In The Call of the Wild, the sled dogs regard the lead sled dog with deference and treat him as leader in all other aspects of life. In White Fang, the other dogs view the lead dog as running away from them and therefore a coward to be tormented. The lead dog must sit with the people in order to be protected. WHAT??!! I don't know anything about sledding but I know about dogs and this simply doesn't make sense. The Call of the Wild was written first so maybe he discovered something that I don't know about. I tried to find some other reviews to see if there was any mention of this but all I could find were school papers and descriptions of the book. Anyone know where I can find good critiques not written by 6th graders?Ok, so I didn't completely dislike White Fang. I was irritated by those things but the storyline is very good. I was surprised when I found out it was written after The Call of the Wild because it seems a little more rough. It reads like a first book, where The Call of the Wild seems more polished. In both books I really enjoyed the interplay between the main characters and the other dogs. The dogs seemed more real than the people. This makes complete sense, since the story is told from the point of view of the dog. The other dogs would be the ones that Buck and White Fang knew the best. London accomplishes this very well. I also enjoyed the exchange between Buck and Thornton and White Fang and Scott. Being an animal lover and having dogs all my life, I know the power of the love from an animal. I was impressed by how Scott won over White Fang. His devotion to Scott reminds me of my boyfriend's dog, Skillet, who treats Jeff as if he hung the moon and my dog, Loki, who treats me the same way. Both of these dogs were rescued also. There seems to be something that happens to a dog who is rescued and loved that makes them more devoted than a dog who comes to you as a puppy, like my other dog, Aurora. She obviously loves me and I love her very much but Loki and Skillet become visibly upset just being out of our presence. I was also impressed that Buck remained with Thornton even when he wanted to be free simply because he loved this man. Many people may say this is anthropomorphizing, that animals can't love like this. I say they have never given themselves to an animal enough to feel that love.more
I used to confuse this with London's "Call of the Wild," and stupidly so. White Fang is three times meaner than Buck ever became. Hee. Curious that London's pieces have become Young Adult classics over the years.more
An old childhood read. Good enough to keep me up most of the night to finish it. Rereading it is a nice stroll down memory lane.more
Eggs greed greed detmore
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