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The Hound of the Baskervilles is one of master mystery writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's most accomplished stories. Sherlock Holmes and his companion Dr. Watson confront one of their most difficult cases ever: is there truly a curse on the old Baskerville estate? Is there truly a ghostly beast lurking on the dark, eerie moors? A masterful concoction of plot and mood, this story is guaranteed to give you the shivers.
Published: Aladdin on
ISBN: 9781442457577
List price: $7.99
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I read this before when I was younger, so none of it was exactly surprising to me. It's better than the other two Holmes novels I've read: the structure is better, that is to say, although I also enjoyed the story a little more, probably because it's so iconic and because I remembered somewhat of what's supposed to be going on. Sherlock has less of a spotlight in this, I suppose, since Watson goes about on his own and investigates, but of course, it's Holmes that figures out everything at the end. I actually found the last chapter or so, the explanation, unnecessarily -- although that's probably because I've read it before, so I knew the significance of details like the boots.

Like the other Holmes stories and novels, though, this is easy to read and fun and kinda hard to put down.more
I’ve read most of Holmes before, but somehow I hadn’t read this one. Atmospheric, creepy, and marvellous. [June 2010]more
This was a super fun read. I was looking for something a little lighter to read and this definitely fit the bill!more
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Reviews

I read this before when I was younger, so none of it was exactly surprising to me. It's better than the other two Holmes novels I've read: the structure is better, that is to say, although I also enjoyed the story a little more, probably because it's so iconic and because I remembered somewhat of what's supposed to be going on. Sherlock has less of a spotlight in this, I suppose, since Watson goes about on his own and investigates, but of course, it's Holmes that figures out everything at the end. I actually found the last chapter or so, the explanation, unnecessarily -- although that's probably because I've read it before, so I knew the significance of details like the boots.

Like the other Holmes stories and novels, though, this is easy to read and fun and kinda hard to put down.more
I’ve read most of Holmes before, but somehow I hadn’t read this one. Atmospheric, creepy, and marvellous. [June 2010]more
This was a super fun read. I was looking for something a little lighter to read and this definitely fit the bill!more
A classic tale which never gets old, this short novel has something for everyone. It's classic Sherlock Holmes, so there is a compelling mystery, great characters and wonderful atmosphere. From the rooms of 221B Baker Street, to the streets of London, to the misty Moor, the sense of time and place is masterfully evoked. There are clues to be discovered and the resolution to be explained to Dr Watson (and thus the reader!) in Holmes' inimitable style. Small wonder that Conan Doyle has influenced generations of mystery writers and that his tales of the great detective still resonate today.

The audiobook was competently narrated by Simon Prebble. A small quibble I have is with his voice for Beryl Stapleton. Her "slight lisp" - as it is described in the text - came out as akin to the accent of Manuel in Fawlty Towers: somewhat distracting, but not fatal to enjoyment.

This was a fun buddy read with my friend Jemidar. Highly recommended!more
Arthur Conan Doyle wrote "Hound of the Baskervilles" eight years after he'd killed Holmes in an attempt to abandon what he thought of as bullshit pop writing and an escape to more serious historical fiction, none of which we give a shit about today. We're all familiar with the belated sequel (*cough* George Lucas). (And he did charge double his usual price for its publication, knowing Holmes' popularity.) Furthermore, he wrote it together with one Fletcher Robinson, whose name reminds me of the awful John Fletcher, Shakespeare's protege, with whom Will wrote such terrible plays as Henry VIII and The Two Noble Kinsmen.

So how surprising is it to we sequel-weary people that Hound of the Baskervilles totally kicks ass?

But it does. Of the two Holmes novellas, this and "Study in Scarlet," Hound is obviously superior. It's perfectly plotted, and its Gothic theme meshes surprisingly well with Holmes' invincible rationality. It's a terrific book.more
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