Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
Paris é uma Festa encontra-se na linha da melhor tradição de Hemingway. A visão a um tempo lúcida e desencantada da vida, ombreando paradoxalmente com a confiança e a plenitude dos anos de criação, o retrato objetivo de muitos dos grandes escritores da nossa época que, como ele, respiravam no ar de Paris o melhor estímulo de aprendizagem e formação, a evocação dessa cidade incomparável, com os seus bistros, os seus velhos castanheiros, os cais, os boulevards, as pontes, imprimem a Paris é uma Festa um lirismo saudoso e pungentemente dramático. Aí encontramos o jovem Hem, no começo de uma carreira que se ignorava se terminaria na ignomínia ou na glória. Aí o encontramos, de algibeiras vazias e a cabeça povoada de sonhos, atento aos mais simples prazeres da vida. Aí o encontramos, ainda moço e rebelde, pronto a invadir o mundo e a sacudi-lo com os abalos da sua rebeldia genial.
Published: Scribner on Aug 2, 2011
ISBN: 9781451655407
List price: $11.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Paris e uma festa [A Moveable Feast]
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

I fell in love with this book—which was at the time my first experience of Hemingway—when I read it a few years ago, and was very much looking forward to this new edition. Hemingway's grandson Seán Hemingway oversaw this project, and in his introduction he explains that Hemingway was continually making changes and adjustments to his text up until the end of his life, sometimes reverting to previous versions, and that he had not written a satisfactory introduction, nor a last chapter, nor found titles for the individual stories or for the book itself, these having been chosen by the editor at Sribner's before the original 1964 publication. Here the stories are presented in a different order and with Hemingway's last changes to the text taken into consideration, and best of all, we find sketches of unfinished stories which he wrote as material for the book, which of course had never been published before.I especially loved the stories about his contemporaries such a Ford Maddox Ford and F. Scott Fitzgerald, as well as Gertrude Stein, among many of the people referred to whom he doesn't hesitate to poke fun at. Though one senses that there is a sense of longing for what may have been simpler times for him, or at least, more youthful ones, there is a dry sense of humour throughout which gives an impression of lightheartedness even when he broaches difficult topics. The first time I read this book, I had no idea what he was talking about half the time, but was so enamoured with his famously pared down style that it didn't matter to me. This time around, maybe I was trying to find meaning too hard, which proved slightly less satisfying. I have many more books of his still to read and I'm sure that once I've read those, as well as other works by his peers, along with various other fiction and non-fiction books about the times, I'll come back to this book again and again with renewed appreciation.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
My God, if you're a writer or hoping to be -- you will love this book! A short time ago I was rereading this, and I'm just struck by how enjoyable it is. Maybe it's even one of the reasons I set out to be a writer in the first place.These are sketches of Hemingway's early days in Paris as he joined other expatriate writers and artists living there. Need I say more? How about that he recalls meeting the likes of Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, Scott Fitzgerald, and that the writing is quite beautifully understated and so easy to read.What do I think of Hemingway, in general? In my opinion, he remains a model for that whole Raymond Chandler/James Cain school of noir writers.Hemingway's short stories remain vital and are wonders of economy and understatement. If you pick up Hemingway's Collected Stories, here's a few I recommend:"The Killers""A Clean, Well-lighted Place""Indian Camp""The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber"Hemingway, more or less, invented "minimalism." Just remember that when you're reading Raymond Carver stories. Bukowski has said that Hemingway was his model, too (only that Buk's work is less crafted and more intentionally primitive -- and injected with more vulgarity and humor). That Hemingway-esque striped-down, simple use of language is something that we (as writers) should all try to go for. Simple is always better.What's interesting about Hemingway is that his writing is minimal yet also concrete. He uses language to evoke the physical, tactile experience of his characters, which very unlike the work of most well-known minimalist writers like Chuck Palahniuk, whose work, in my opinion, is more sketchy, with characters who are less real and three-dimensional.Hemingway's novels have aged less well, in my opinion. The descriptive parts in all his books remain beautiful, but the terse dialogue and macho posturing/simplicity has dated them. We hardly ever get inside the heads of the characters and are subjected to view them from the outside, understanding them only from their limited behavior and dialogue (like in a movie). Others might disagree with my assessment.Getting back to Hemingway's A MOVEABLE FEAST, it's highly recommended for all the impractical dreamers out there, like myself, in love with the romance 1920s Paris and the "Writing Life."read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Collected and published posthumously this book contains fiction and non-fiction from Hemingway's time spent in Paris.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

I fell in love with this book—which was at the time my first experience of Hemingway—when I read it a few years ago, and was very much looking forward to this new edition. Hemingway's grandson Seán Hemingway oversaw this project, and in his introduction he explains that Hemingway was continually making changes and adjustments to his text up until the end of his life, sometimes reverting to previous versions, and that he had not written a satisfactory introduction, nor a last chapter, nor found titles for the individual stories or for the book itself, these having been chosen by the editor at Sribner's before the original 1964 publication. Here the stories are presented in a different order and with Hemingway's last changes to the text taken into consideration, and best of all, we find sketches of unfinished stories which he wrote as material for the book, which of course had never been published before.I especially loved the stories about his contemporaries such a Ford Maddox Ford and F. Scott Fitzgerald, as well as Gertrude Stein, among many of the people referred to whom he doesn't hesitate to poke fun at. Though one senses that there is a sense of longing for what may have been simpler times for him, or at least, more youthful ones, there is a dry sense of humour throughout which gives an impression of lightheartedness even when he broaches difficult topics. The first time I read this book, I had no idea what he was talking about half the time, but was so enamoured with his famously pared down style that it didn't matter to me. This time around, maybe I was trying to find meaning too hard, which proved slightly less satisfying. I have many more books of his still to read and I'm sure that once I've read those, as well as other works by his peers, along with various other fiction and non-fiction books about the times, I'll come back to this book again and again with renewed appreciation.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
My God, if you're a writer or hoping to be -- you will love this book! A short time ago I was rereading this, and I'm just struck by how enjoyable it is. Maybe it's even one of the reasons I set out to be a writer in the first place.These are sketches of Hemingway's early days in Paris as he joined other expatriate writers and artists living there. Need I say more? How about that he recalls meeting the likes of Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, Scott Fitzgerald, and that the writing is quite beautifully understated and so easy to read.What do I think of Hemingway, in general? In my opinion, he remains a model for that whole Raymond Chandler/James Cain school of noir writers.Hemingway's short stories remain vital and are wonders of economy and understatement. If you pick up Hemingway's Collected Stories, here's a few I recommend:"The Killers""A Clean, Well-lighted Place""Indian Camp""The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber"Hemingway, more or less, invented "minimalism." Just remember that when you're reading Raymond Carver stories. Bukowski has said that Hemingway was his model, too (only that Buk's work is less crafted and more intentionally primitive -- and injected with more vulgarity and humor). That Hemingway-esque striped-down, simple use of language is something that we (as writers) should all try to go for. Simple is always better.What's interesting about Hemingway is that his writing is minimal yet also concrete. He uses language to evoke the physical, tactile experience of his characters, which very unlike the work of most well-known minimalist writers like Chuck Palahniuk, whose work, in my opinion, is more sketchy, with characters who are less real and three-dimensional.Hemingway's novels have aged less well, in my opinion. The descriptive parts in all his books remain beautiful, but the terse dialogue and macho posturing/simplicity has dated them. We hardly ever get inside the heads of the characters and are subjected to view them from the outside, understanding them only from their limited behavior and dialogue (like in a movie). Others might disagree with my assessment.Getting back to Hemingway's A MOVEABLE FEAST, it's highly recommended for all the impractical dreamers out there, like myself, in love with the romance 1920s Paris and the "Writing Life."
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Collected and published posthumously this book contains fiction and non-fiction from Hemingway's time spent in Paris.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
"If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast."In general I'm not a huge fan of Hemingway. I've read For Whom the Bell Tolls, Farewell to Arms, The Old Man and the Sea, The Sun Also Rises and True at First Light, so I have a decent view of his breadth of work. It always seems stilted to me. I feel distant from whatever is happening. The plot is too simple or I don't feel connected to the characters, especially the women, who are apparently only there to serve the men. I've enjoyed some of his books, but wouldn't say I love them. The exception to that is A Moveable Feast, which is interesting because it's the only nonfiction book of his I've read. Hemingway wrote this about his early days as a writer when he was living in Paris with his wife Hadley in the 1920s. He was a struggling artist, spending his days writing in cafes and hanging out with his friends, Joyce, Pound and Fitzgerald to name a few. I read this book shortly after moving back to the states from London. I had visited Paris multiple times while in Europe and the beauty of the city was still fresh in my mind. I'm sure that had a huge impact on my appreciation for the book, just as your personal experiences always have an effect on how you interpret what you're reading. I don't think this is a perfect book. Many critique it for the rosy view of Hemingway and negative view of many others. But to me that's expected... Hemingway wrote it, take his words with a big grain of salt. Of course he's going to make himself look good and idealize that time period. The thing that hooked me is his description of the places and the people. It made me want to be there on the Left Bank perusing books in the Shakespeare and Co. or taking a road trip with Fitzgerald. Everything felt so real to me. It was the first time I felt completely drawn in to one of his books and I think it's because he was actually connected to that life, so he couldn't help pouring those feelings into the book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm not entirely sure what I think of this book. It's basically a series of essays about Hemingway's early years in Paris, but there's not much of a connection between most of them, and they're not all necessarily in chronological order. But given that I read the book while in Paris, it was enjoyable to read about streets and quarters that I've been in.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I really enjoyed this book. I loved all the name-dropping and gossip about writers Hemingway spent time with in Paris. I'm a big fan of F. Scott Fitzgerald, so the stories about him and crazy Zelda were especially interesting to me.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Load more
scribd