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The Frandidate

The Frandidate

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The Frandidate

ratings:
4.5/5 (10 ratings)
Length:
123 pages
22 minutes
Released:
Jun 18, 2013
ISBN:
9781416996644
Format:
Book

Description

Goosebumps and Bill Nye the Science Guy fans, meet Franny!

Franny K. Stein, Mad Scientist, has always had her eye on world domination, and she has to start somewhere...like her class elections! If people vote for her, they’ll be giving her all the control she wants.

But Franny’s platform doesn’t have the same appeal as her competitors who are offering new playground equipment, so she creates The Frandidate. Made of DNA samples from a dog, a chameleon and a parrot, along with a scrap of carpet (so she’ll know where people stand), Franny’s special suit helps her say and do exactly what people want! But when The Frandidate starts making promises she knows she can’t keep, Franny realizes she might have gone too far…
Released:
Jun 18, 2013
ISBN:
9781416996644
Format:
Book

About the author

Jim Benton is the New York Times bestselling writer of the Dear Dumb Diary series and a cartoonist whose unique brand of humor has been seen on toys, television, T-shirts, greeting cards, and even underwear. Franny K. Stein is the first character he’s created especially for young children. A husband and father of two, he lives in Michigan, where he works in a studio that really and truly does have creepy stuff in it.

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Book Preview

The Frandidate - Jim Benton

Wolin

CHAPTER ONE

FRANNY’S HOUSE

The Stein family lived in the pretty pink house with lovely purple shutters down at the end of Daffodil Street. Everything about the house was bright and cheery. Everything, that is, except the upstairs bedroom with the tiny round window.

Behind this window was Franny’s room, which was also her laboratory—her Mad Scientist Laboratory.

Franny wasn’t your average mad scientist. Franny wasn’t planning to take over the universe, or galaxy, or even the world.

Franny thought that maybe she should want to take over the world, being a mad scientist and everything, but it seemed wrong to her somehow.

It was tempting, of course. If she were in charge, she knew she could use her genius to do all sorts of great things that people wouldn’t let her do now.

Like, if she added a pinch of kangaroo DNA to human cells, we wouldn’t need cars anymore.

And if she made everybody’s whole kitchen a microwave oven, they could just set the table, press a button, and everything would cook all at once.

Or she could go ahead with her plan to just squirt the sunscreen directly on the sun itself, so we wouldn’t have to wipe it on ourselves all the time.

And if she ever decided to take over the world, she knew nobody would be able to keep her from doing it.

She could have used her Chimpofier to turn everybody into monkeys that she could easily control with a few bananas.

Or she could have simply used her Steiny Heiny

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Reviews

What people think about The Frandidate

4.3
10 ratings / 2 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    one of the best novels
    but very short series
    hive
  • (5/5)
    My younger sister recommended this book to me because it is a part of one of her favorite book series, and I really enjoyed reading it. The first reason I liked this book is because of the character development of Franny. Franny is a “mad scientist,” but the author makes sure to inform the reader that she is not the mean or diabolical type because she is just a little girl. Franny always wants to tell the truth, and she never wants to hurt anyone with her inventions, only help people. I like that the author makes this distinction because it doesn’t give students a bad impression or the idea that wanting to take over the world and punish people is okay. The second reason I liked this book is because of the engaging illustrations featured throughout the book. It is a great beginning chapter book because the pictures help the students visualize the text, but it is still a 110 page book with 20 different chapters. The illustrations are detailed for a chapter book, and they feature shading and outlining, which makes them look a little spooky. In addition, a lot of the illustrations are funny, which is always a great aspect in a book. The main idea of this book is that telling the truth is always the right option, and it will make you feel better than lying.