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The inimitable Anne Shirley makes her mark on Avonlea in this artfully packaged edition of the sequel to Anne of Green Gables.

Five years after Anne Shirley came to the town of Avonlea, she feels (a little) more grown up, but she’s still the same skinny, red-headed orphan Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert took in. After putting her dream of attending Redmond College on hold so she can help Marilla with the farm, Anne doubts she has many adventures ahead of her. But even in plain old Avonlea, her life proves to be anything but ordinary.

This sequel to Anne of Green Gables follows Anne’s endeavors to become a successful teacher, help raise a pair of rambunctious twins, and improve her beloved hometown—with the help of her former enemy, Gilbert Blythe, who’s giving her an awful lot of attention…

This addition to the renowned Anne of Green Gables series makes a wonderful gift and keepsake.
Published: Aladdin on
ISBN: 9781442458581
List price: $7.99
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 After reading Anne of Green Gables and Anne of Avonlea, I felt compelled to read Anne of the Island, the third out of the four books in the series by Lucy Maud Montgomery. Anne of the Island continues Anne’s life story as she spends four years at Redmond, a college. She battles furiously against her heart during those years. Gilbert Blythe is determined to win her heart over, showing her his love in every possible way he can. Anne, on the other hand, is determined to not give into Gilbert’s affections, denying every offer of them becoming a couple.To make matters worse, her best friend, Diana Barry, is getting married and will be leaving Avonlea to start a new life. with ups and downs, Anne’s view of college changes with each surprise discovered. What I absolutely loved about Lucy Maud Montgomery’s writing is that she does focus on one specific character, but along with that she also gives each character a moment to shine, describing their characteristics and personality and giving them a scene that shows off their purpose.For instance, there is a little boy named Davy, a twin that Marilla and Mrs. Rachel Lynde take care of. He is always getting into trouble, and absolutely adores Anne. At one point, Anne comes home from college for vacation to find Davy crying alone. After asking him what happened, Davy answers with something like this:“Dora fell off the stairs!” “Did you do it?” “No, I’m crying ‘cause she didn't get hurt!” I laughed so hard after I read that part because he reminded me so much of my ten younger cousins and their skirmishes. It was just like them! I have no complaints over Montgomery’s books, except for the endings.They are such cliffhangers! It makes me want to get out there and buy the next one, but I can’t! It;s so frustrating! I recommend this book and any of the Anne books to anyone who loves to read and can understand language that is a bit old-fashioned. It is a bit confusing at first, but if you are a good reader you would jump right in immediately. This is a very interesting and fun book to read!more
This book combines "Anne of the Island," one of the better of the "Anne of Green Gables" series, with two collections of short stories written by L. M. Montgomery at various points in her career. A very helpful introduction drawing on Montgomery's diary entries and other biographical information helps situate these writings in her own personal history, enabling the reader to better understand the mind of the author. I am less than impressed with some of the "Anne" books, although a few of the series show a real capability on Montgomery's part, and this book helped me to get a better sense of how Montgomery may have been torn between doing her best and most personal writing and offering her publisher and her audiences what they wanted, which was more of Anne and romance.This becomes abundantly clear in reading the short stories in this collection, some of which were written and appeared in print before the Anne novels but which Montgomery was later induced to write Anne into for publication as a book of short stories. This authorial manipulation, which was likely the real-life inspiration behind the "Rollings Reliable Baking Powder" incident referred to in the Anne books, is painfully apparent and adds no literary merit to the stories, instead distracting from their charm as works of art in their own right. The distraction is fleeting, however, and thankfully so, for these stories are some of the best writing Montgomery has ever done. They reveal the author's adept hand with humour and her ability to surprise the reader with a Dickensian plot twist accomplished in a short frame of time. This quality is what lends so many of the Anne books their charm, yet I often feel that those books suffer as novels because they lack the sense of overarching purpose that Montgomery unpacks so easily in the short story form. Her writing is particularly interesting when she takes a male character's first-person perspective, giving a glimpse into her own independent spirit and a tongue-in-cheek critique of the foolishness of the gossip and slavishness to fashion that have plagued women since well before her time and into ours today. It seems to be a pity that these stories could not be published as a collection in their own right, without being tacked on to an Anne novel, even if it is a very good novel, for they stand up quite well on their own and deserve to be elevated from their position in the shadow of Montgomery's most famous character.more

Reviews

 After reading Anne of Green Gables and Anne of Avonlea, I felt compelled to read Anne of the Island, the third out of the four books in the series by Lucy Maud Montgomery. Anne of the Island continues Anne’s life story as she spends four years at Redmond, a college. She battles furiously against her heart during those years. Gilbert Blythe is determined to win her heart over, showing her his love in every possible way he can. Anne, on the other hand, is determined to not give into Gilbert’s affections, denying every offer of them becoming a couple.To make matters worse, her best friend, Diana Barry, is getting married and will be leaving Avonlea to start a new life. with ups and downs, Anne’s view of college changes with each surprise discovered. What I absolutely loved about Lucy Maud Montgomery’s writing is that she does focus on one specific character, but along with that she also gives each character a moment to shine, describing their characteristics and personality and giving them a scene that shows off their purpose.For instance, there is a little boy named Davy, a twin that Marilla and Mrs. Rachel Lynde take care of. He is always getting into trouble, and absolutely adores Anne. At one point, Anne comes home from college for vacation to find Davy crying alone. After asking him what happened, Davy answers with something like this:“Dora fell off the stairs!” “Did you do it?” “No, I’m crying ‘cause she didn't get hurt!” I laughed so hard after I read that part because he reminded me so much of my ten younger cousins and their skirmishes. It was just like them! I have no complaints over Montgomery’s books, except for the endings.They are such cliffhangers! It makes me want to get out there and buy the next one, but I can’t! It;s so frustrating! I recommend this book and any of the Anne books to anyone who loves to read and can understand language that is a bit old-fashioned. It is a bit confusing at first, but if you are a good reader you would jump right in immediately. This is a very interesting and fun book to read!more
This book combines "Anne of the Island," one of the better of the "Anne of Green Gables" series, with two collections of short stories written by L. M. Montgomery at various points in her career. A very helpful introduction drawing on Montgomery's diary entries and other biographical information helps situate these writings in her own personal history, enabling the reader to better understand the mind of the author. I am less than impressed with some of the "Anne" books, although a few of the series show a real capability on Montgomery's part, and this book helped me to get a better sense of how Montgomery may have been torn between doing her best and most personal writing and offering her publisher and her audiences what they wanted, which was more of Anne and romance.This becomes abundantly clear in reading the short stories in this collection, some of which were written and appeared in print before the Anne novels but which Montgomery was later induced to write Anne into for publication as a book of short stories. This authorial manipulation, which was likely the real-life inspiration behind the "Rollings Reliable Baking Powder" incident referred to in the Anne books, is painfully apparent and adds no literary merit to the stories, instead distracting from their charm as works of art in their own right. The distraction is fleeting, however, and thankfully so, for these stories are some of the best writing Montgomery has ever done. They reveal the author's adept hand with humour and her ability to surprise the reader with a Dickensian plot twist accomplished in a short frame of time. This quality is what lends so many of the Anne books their charm, yet I often feel that those books suffer as novels because they lack the sense of overarching purpose that Montgomery unpacks so easily in the short story form. Her writing is particularly interesting when she takes a male character's first-person perspective, giving a glimpse into her own independent spirit and a tongue-in-cheek critique of the foolishness of the gossip and slavishness to fashion that have plagued women since well before her time and into ours today. It seems to be a pity that these stories could not be published as a collection in their own right, without being tacked on to an Anne novel, even if it is a very good novel, for they stand up quite well on their own and deserve to be elevated from their position in the shadow of Montgomery's most famous character.more
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