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The inimitable Anne Shirley makes her mark on Avonlea in this artfully packaged edition of the sequel to Anne of Green Gables.

Five years after Anne Shirley came to the town of Avonlea, she feels (a little) more grown up, but she’s still the same skinny, red-headed orphan Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert took in. After putting her dream of attending Redmond College on hold so she can help Marilla with the farm, Anne doubts she has many adventures ahead of her. But even in plain old Avonlea, her life proves to be anything but ordinary.

This sequel to Anne of Green Gables follows Anne’s endeavors to become a successful teacher, help raise a pair of rambunctious twins, and improve her beloved hometown—with the help of her former enemy, Gilbert Blythe, who’s giving her an awful lot of attention…

This addition to the renowned Anne of Green Gables series makes a wonderful gift and keepsake.
Published: Aladdin on Mar 6, 2012
ISBN: 9781442458581
List price: $7.99
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Ahh Anne! Anne of Avonlea is one of my favorites of all time. And yes, I can honestly say that I like it even better than Green Gables. By the time you get to the second novel, Anne is growing out of her bratty stage and growing up. And there's Gilbert! The early relationship between Anne and Gilbert is wonderfully typical of the boy and girl next door, with all of the teasing and tension! I love it! I seriously think Gilbert was one of my first crushes!!!read more
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A great read. Sequels can be difficult, especially if the first book is so good. This sequel doesn't disappoint. It continues the story of Anne, Marilla, and Gilbert while introducing the twins Davy and Dora. If you liked the Anne movies, be prepared because this book is very different in some respects. This is where the books and movies really begin to split apart.read more
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This is quite possibly one of my favorite in the series. The others aren't nearly as dog-eared.

I do think this book (and any other by Montgomery) are a little tough to get through if you're older than 13. Mostly because of the very fluffy and antiquated language. But I love them!read more
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Ahh Anne! Anne of Avonlea is one of my favorites of all time. And yes, I can honestly say that I like it even better than Green Gables. By the time you get to the second novel, Anne is growing out of her bratty stage and growing up. And there's Gilbert! The early relationship between Anne and Gilbert is wonderfully typical of the boy and girl next door, with all of the teasing and tension! I love it! I seriously think Gilbert was one of my first crushes!!!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A great read. Sequels can be difficult, especially if the first book is so good. This sequel doesn't disappoint. It continues the story of Anne, Marilla, and Gilbert while introducing the twins Davy and Dora. If you liked the Anne movies, be prepared because this book is very different in some respects. This is where the books and movies really begin to split apart.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is quite possibly one of my favorite in the series. The others aren't nearly as dog-eared.

I do think this book (and any other by Montgomery) are a little tough to get through if you're older than 13. Mostly because of the very fluffy and antiquated language. But I love them!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the second book in the 'Anne' series, and takes our heroine, at half-past sixteen, from the end of the first book through about a year and a half of growing up, when her imagination helps her see the beautiful, and the funny, sides of life, whether things are going well, or she's getting into one of her scrapes (though she doesn't have quite so many of them as she used to).This is a more gentle book, as Anne's temper mellows and her friendships deepen. The young people of Avonlea form an Improvement Society, and prevail against the amusement of older heads so well that the Society grows considerably. There is the addition of six year old twins - who struck a chord with me, although mischievous Davy is more like my one year old than my six year old. And there is more than a hint of romance in the air as Anne meets new friends who renew old courtships , and her old friends start to grow up and begin new courtships.Montgomery's evocations are as poetical as ever, bedecking her beloved Island in misty, pastel hues. I may not be quite one of Anne's 'kindred spirits', but my imagination hasn't been fully quenched, and I do love being taken back to a place that reminds me of my childhood. Enchantingly written, as always.
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I began reading Anne of Avonlea, the second book in the Anne of Green Gables series, with some trepidation. I knew that the book would be different than its predecessor in the series. I was worried that the book would not have the childhood wonder, without which I knew that I could not enjoy it as much. The imagination of the character as she grows older would dim, somehow, or become less believable and enchanting, I feared. I could not have been more wrong. Yes, Anne Shirley is an adult, or what counted as grown-up at the time of the story, at sixteen years old. Yes, she acts, for the most part, as an adult. Yet, she does not lose her infectious enthusiasm, her imagination, or her wondrous ability to see the beauty in life. I will warn that there are minor spoilers to follow. The story begins shortly before Anne begins teaching at Avonlea School, a post which she took in order to help care for her foster mother Marilla Cuthbert when Marilla’s brother Matthew died at the end of the first book. She is involved with her good friend, and fellow teacher at a nearby school, Gilbert Blythe, in an “improvement society”. When the book begins, both of these noble pursuits are embarked upon with ever so many sophisticated, and naïve, theories, which Anne is forced to either modify or give up. Even this, however, does not dampen her idealism. It merely tempers it, teaching her how to direct her energies to accomplish the most good. Indeed, it was a joy to watch her learn, and grow throughout the story. It almost feels as if I am watching a real person. This is the magic of Montgomery’s writing. I found myself only finding fault with Montgomery when it came to some of her new characters in the story. Most of the new characters I took to just as eagerly as I did in the first story. The only issue I had was with the characters of Davy and Paul. Davy was one of Marilla’s distant relations that she took custody of upon the death of his and his sister’s Dora’s mother. Paul is a sweet-natured child that was one of Anne’s students. My problem with the characters was that Paul was so incredibly whiny that it drove me nuts, while Davy was a mouthy, rude, mean-spirited child who I wanted to reach into the story and give a good spanking. Eesh! Of course, the worst part of the characters was how we were not given a chance to accept them naturally on our own. Montgomery tries so hard to persuade the audience to like the two boys, and I believe that had she not tried so hard, but just wrote better characters in their places, I might have found them to be more likable. That said, there are several new characters to like. Among them are Mr. and Mrs. Harrison and Miss Lavender. I really liked the way that the Harrisons worked out their marriage issues. The surprise of Mrs. Harrison, and watching them work out their problems with each other was absolutely charming and quite comical. Miss Lavender was the fulfillment of a middle-aged Anne. It is a wonder to me that Montgomery could fall down on creating good younger versions of Anne in Davy and Paul, when she did such a marvelous job with Miss Lavender. Indeed, I am assured that Anne will always be an interesting character if Montgomery can capture her in her adult years the way that she captured Miss Lavender.The last forty or so pages were difficult to get through. This is not because they were badly written. No, indeed, they were marvelously written. It is because they were so full of watching a young woman realize that she has to change her life. We all know the feeling. We come to “bends in the road” as Anne puts it, and must choose how to act when we do so. Often it is painful to make these choices, but make them we must. I am sure that Anne will make the correct choice, despite the pain of it all. This is where I continue to find inspiration in Anne. She knows that there are hard things yet to come in life. She knows that it would be ever so much easier to not take the “bend in the road”. Yet she takes it all the same, because she knows that it is best for her. What is easy is not always what is right or good for us, and what is right or good for us is not always easy. Or so the old adage goes. There are so many issues and areas in which I would dearly, truly love to not take the “bend” that I know that I ought to take. Sometimes, such a bend is to do something, and sometimes it is not to do something that I wish to do. Either way, I must take that “bend”, or else risk losing out on something marvelous that the Lord has for me. Anne acknowledges that the Almighty has a hand in things, or what we would call Providence existing. I know that He does, and I am ready to follow Him. Despite the differences in age and temperament of Anne Shirley, this book was almost as beloved as the first one. It also taught me even more lessons about life. It is amazing that I have learned, indeed that I continue to learn, so much from a fictional character. Yet I have, and I do. That is the mark of a Classic, of a good book. Read this series, enjoy it, and see what you can learn as well. Explore the life and times of this red-headed heroine. I highly recommend this book.
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Anne has graduated from Queen's Academy and taken the Avonlea school, while Gilbert works at the White Sands school a few miles away. Here she meets a cast of new characters, some of them younger siblings of her school friends, some (like Paul Irving, an instant kindred spirit) newcomers to the Island. At home in Green Gables, some changes have occurred. Matthew is gone, but Mrs. Rachel Lynde has moved in after her husband passed quietly away. Moreover, Marilla has taken on two more orphans, Dora and Davy, children of a distant cousin. Anne and Marilla soon realize that Anne's mishaps and adventures were tame compared to the scrapes Davy gets himself into on a daily basis, but through it all, they can't help but love his impish ways.Other adventures color this sequel, including the "young people's" village improvement society, some matchmaking and merrymaking, and old friendships continued and deepened.Those who might have been slightly put off my Anne's chatter in "Anne of Green Gables" may better relate to Anne now. She has matured some, and although her imagination is active as ever, she is not quite so talkative. Overall, another great book, one I tend to read every year or so.
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