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Orphaned Heidi lives with her gruff but caring grandfather on the side of Swiss mountain, where she befriends young Peter the goat-herd. She leads an idyllic life, until she is forced to leave the mountain she has always known to go and live with a sickly girl in the city. Will Heidi ever see her grandfather again? A classic tale of a young girl's coming-of-age, of friendship, and familial love, Heidi has inspired countless dramatic versions, both on TV and in film, including Shirley Temple's famous 1937 version.
Published: Aladdin on Feb 21, 2012
ISBN: 9781442458017
List price: $6.99
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So, okay, Heidi's one of those characters that're excessively perfect, but the story is captivating nonetheless. Heidi's creative, and her fun in the Alps was fun to read about. What I remember perhaps the most about this book was that she learned to read after she discovered the value of reading- that the letters held words and stories.read more
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Heidi, aka The Mountains Aren’t Handicap Accessible, is the story of an orphaned 5-year-old who’s dropped at her recluse grandfather’s home in the Swiss mountains. Her sunny demeanor changes everyone around her. From her cranky grandpa to Peter the goat-herd to a blind elderly woman, she cheers up everyone she meets. She’s the picture of innocence and optimism. Her naïve view of the world encourages others and gives them hope. She’s a bit of a Pollyanna and finds her greatest satisfaction in doing things for others. Soon after moving to the mountains she’s sent off to Frankfurt, Germany to live as a companion to Klara, a rich girl who is confined to a wheelchair. She finds herself battling an overwhelming homesickness for her life in the mountains and detests city life. It’s a good story, but Heidi is just so sweet. That’s not a bad thing it just meant there wasn’t much to dig my teeth into. I think this would be a perfect book to read with kids, although it was much longer than I expected it to be (almost 300 pages). “How good it is that the dear Lord doesn’t give us what we pray so terribly hard for when He knows of something much better.”read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Still treacly. Still piously Christian in every particular. But still and all, wonderful. When poor Heidi is away from her mountain, my heart breaks for her. When she is with the goats, I could sing. This audio version is nicely done, and makes a beautiful bedtime story.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

So, okay, Heidi's one of those characters that're excessively perfect, but the story is captivating nonetheless. Heidi's creative, and her fun in the Alps was fun to read about. What I remember perhaps the most about this book was that she learned to read after she discovered the value of reading- that the letters held words and stories.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Heidi, aka The Mountains Aren’t Handicap Accessible, is the story of an orphaned 5-year-old who’s dropped at her recluse grandfather’s home in the Swiss mountains. Her sunny demeanor changes everyone around her. From her cranky grandpa to Peter the goat-herd to a blind elderly woman, she cheers up everyone she meets. She’s the picture of innocence and optimism. Her naïve view of the world encourages others and gives them hope. She’s a bit of a Pollyanna and finds her greatest satisfaction in doing things for others. Soon after moving to the mountains she’s sent off to Frankfurt, Germany to live as a companion to Klara, a rich girl who is confined to a wheelchair. She finds herself battling an overwhelming homesickness for her life in the mountains and detests city life. It’s a good story, but Heidi is just so sweet. That’s not a bad thing it just meant there wasn’t much to dig my teeth into. I think this would be a perfect book to read with kids, although it was much longer than I expected it to be (almost 300 pages). “How good it is that the dear Lord doesn’t give us what we pray so terribly hard for when He knows of something much better.”
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Still treacly. Still piously Christian in every particular. But still and all, wonderful. When poor Heidi is away from her mountain, my heart breaks for her. When she is with the goats, I could sing. This audio version is nicely done, and makes a beautiful bedtime story.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I checked this book out from the library numerous times in my elementary school years. Something about the warm-hearted and spirited mountain girl Heidi always kept me running back to this book, though it was perhaps the beautiful descriptions of the mountains and the goats that most fascinated me - I had no trouble reading and then re-reading some of the best passages for hours on end. Finally bought my own copy a couple of years ago when walking through a used books store contemplating purchasing possibilities: I passed the children's section and Heidi jumped to mind, and, luckily, it was in stock. I read it again and found it every bit as enjoyable as I did when younger, though I find myself even more drawn to the outdoors imagery as opposed to the people than I did before. If the book has any fault, it is that its innocent-girl-changes-all-the-bitter-people-around-her story is a little too sweet, sometimes bordering on the preachy, and is, at times, almost laughable. But it's difficult to really hold this against the work, as it is rather a moral story for children. In that light it succeeds brilliantly. Any child that doesn't get to experience the simple joy that is Heidi is missing out on a treasure among books.
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"Heidi". Can you believe I'm reading freakin' "Heidi"? Is that desperation, or what? Actually, I have to confess that lack of reading material doesn't figure into this. "Heidi" is on the list of books that my younger daughter has to read/have read to her for school. To be a good teacher, I figure I should read the literature the curriculum is foisting upon my kids. But whatever the motivation, I have perused "Heidi" and have to admit that I enjoyed it. I didn't think I was going to. I mean, I think that repeated exposure to "The Brady Bunch" in my formative years has permanently prejudiced me to "nice" stories and characters. So I was expecting "Heidi" to be a drag. It didn't start out so great. This book was originally written in German and the characters speak and act a bit off from what I'm used to. And the lead character was, as expected, a sweet, innocent little girl who spreads sunshine wherever she goes. But for some reason, that didn't annoy me so much. Maybe it was her way of innocently challenging the status quo, be it by tossing her fancy clothes aside when she got hot or by tweaking the ever restrictive Fraulein Rottenmeier. (love that name...) Or maybe it's that Heidi didn't manage to totally redeem the world--some sadness remained and some people resisted the child's charm. Whatever it was, by the end I was willingly reading the novel, wondering how it would all end. I even have to recommend that you check it out. You can always go watch "The Simpsons" later.--J.
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My copy of Heidi is actually a hardback with beautiful illustrations. I loved this book. Probably very unrealistic, with an overly idyllic picture of the setting -- but lovely all the same.
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