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Jodi Picoult, the New York Times bestselling author of Vanishing Acts, offers her most powerful chronicle yet of an American family with a story that probes the unbreakable bond between parent and child -- and the dangerous repercussions of trying to play the hero.

Trixie Stone is fourteen years old and in love for the first time. She's also the light of her father's life -- a straight-A student; a freshman in high school who is pretty and popular; a girl who's always looked up to Daniel Stone as a hero. Until, that is, her world is turned upside down with a single act of violence...and suddenly everything Trixie has believed about her family -- and herself -- seems to be a lie.

For fifteen years, Daniel Stone has been an even-tempered, mild-mannered man: a stay-at-home dad to Trixie and a husband who has put his own career as a comic book artist behind that of his wife, Laura, who teaches Dante's Inferno at a local college. But years ago, he was completely different: growing up as the only white boy in an Eskimo village, he was teased mercilessly for the color of his skin. He learned to fight back: stealing, drinking, robbing, and cheating his way out of the Alaskan bush. To become part of a family, he reinvented himself, channeling his rage onto the page and burying his past completely...until now. Could the young boy who once made Trixie's face fill with light when he came to the door have been the one to end her childhood forever? She says that he is, and that is all it takes to make Daniel, a man with a history he has hidden even from his family, venture to hell and back in order to protect his daughter.

The Tenth Circle looks at that delicate moment when a child learns that her parents don't know all of the answers and when being a good parent means letting go of your child. It asks whether you can reinvent yourself in the course of a lifetime or if your mistakes are carried forever -- if life is, as in any good comic book, a struggle to control good and evil, or if good and evil control you.

Topics: Alaska, Maine, Suspenseful, Dramatic, Sexual Abuse, Family, Fathers, Sex, Daughters, Race Relations, and Parenting

Published: Atria Books on
ISBN: 9781416523123
List price: $11.99
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I am not sure if I had read this before. Well done and well researched. It covers date-rape, adultery, running away from life, and family. Throw in an Ididorod like Alaskan mush race and a comic book penciller. Her writing is so good, she could write anything and it would read well, no matter how improbable.more
on Monday, July 07, 2008 I wrote about this book:

I started this book while on Holiday and finished it yesterday, the day I came home.
Really enjoyed it. The end was a bit a surprise for me but I like that. I like to be surprised.
9 out of 10more
Although I had read quite a number of Jodi Picoult books, I was doubtful about this one because it included a lot of the material in comic-strip format and I do not like comics or graphic novels at al. I needn't have worried though, because the story reads just as well just sticking to the text. In fact, especially after the tedious writing and despicable characters of Mercy, I was really surprised by some good storytelling and quite well-rounded characters. The research Picoult had put into modern adolescent sexual behaviour and into the lives of native Alaskans really enlivened the book. The only point that was a bit of a downer for me was that the ending was guessable and dealt with in matter of a few lines when I would have liked it to go on a bit more. Perhaps that is the mark of a good read - when you want it to go on a bit more!more
There really isn't much to say about this book. It wasn't bad, but it wasn't good either. There was nothing new or special about it. I didn't find any of the characters very likable, and it was pretty hard to follow in the sense that Picoult kept hinting at something else all the time, and eventually I lost track of what happened and what didn't happened.

The comic book strips were boring, and I skipped them all. There was far too much endless rambling about Daniel's career, and we are told far too many times that he hides his past- as if we didn't pick that up the first two times. Also, there were at least four sentences (supposedly ''deep'' sentences) that I swear I've read in other Picoult books, which annoyed me.

The ending was dreadfully written, as are all Picoult's endings. I am, however, rather anxious to read The Divine Comedy after this.more
This is a little different than other Picoult books I’ve read. Interspersed throughout this book is a graphic novel written by the main character, Daniel Stone, that mirrors the story. It adds to the authenticity of the story.I must admit, I had a hard time with this book. It’s about the tragedies of a 14 year-old. It was hard to read as the mother of a 15 year-old. But, I wanted to see how the characters moved through the events.It was not a happy story and didn’t end with all the problems tied into a neat bow. It was a story of a journey both internally and across the country. As the characters moved from the safety of what they knew in Bethel, Maine to the absolute unknown of Bethel, Alaska they each changed. Mom, Laura, Dad, Daniel and Daughter, Trixie, will never be the same. What they each learned on the journey became the most important part of this story.So - can I recommend it?? Not whole heartedly or without reservation. But, it is a story that haunts me and causes me to continue to pause and look more closely at the relationships in my own family.01/07more
This book was not one of my favorites of Picoult, but still made me want to speed through the book! Lots of drama and tragedy, similarly to other Picoult books, with Trixie having to deal with loss and judgement among other troubling things through out her teens. This book made me appreciate all the good things in my life.more
I read the book "The Tenth Circle" because I love the author, Jodi Picoult. I have read some of her books before and I couldn't put them down until I was finished with them. This book was exactly the same for me as all of the other ones. It makes you think a lot and makes you appreciate everything you have that is good.This story is about a young girl, Trixie, who gets date raped and what the reaction of her even-tempered father, Daniel, has to the situation. Daniel has hidden his past life from his daughter, but after the tragedy he can't keep himself under control. Trixie ends up running away and Daniel's life is turned upside down.The book all too well shows what happens in everyday life to some families. Life can be cruel to people and knowing how to deal with the unkindness is very important. Bad things do happen to good people and you might not think it will to you, but neither did Trixie or Daniel.I would recommend this book to anyone going through a hard time or probably just about any girl.more
I love Picoult books and have yet to find one that didn't grip me in an emotional tornado...until this book. While I was still swept up in the story it just didn't get to me like most of her books do. I didn't really like any of the characters and just couldn't achieve the connection that is normal for me in reading her books. I gave it a 4 stars but was just not into it enough for a 5.more
I really enjoyed this book. Jodi Picoult is one of my favorite authors. I really enjoyed how Picoult incorporated the animations within the pages.I wouldn't recommend watching the movie, It skips out the entire part where she goes to Alaska, and many other times. I believe that was a Lifetime movie.more
Because I loved My Sister's Keeper, I really wanted to love this book. I gave it 3 stars because oddly enough, I couldn't put it down. By the time I got to the last quarter of the book though, I wanted it to hurry up and end. When I want a book to never end, it's either because the ending is left open to interpretation or I fell in love with the characters. I never could fall in love with the characters in this book. All that said, it was a quick easy read that kept me hanging on for about 3/4 of the book.more
I predicted the end of this book, and then disregarded my hypothesis after reading some more. Not my favorite of Picoult's novels but as usual an interesting topic in regards to family and personal struggles.more
Of the four Jodi Picoult books I've read, I think I enjoyed this one the least. I wasn't a fan of the plot really, it got super complicated after a while and to me it started to feel a little bit dragged out. However, there were some parts of the book where I thought the writing was a little bit better than usual for Picoult, hence the three star rating.more
Compellingly readable. Jodi Picoult's books are hard to put down as you get swept into the topical family drama that she is sure to be writing on. This book deals with the possible rape of a teenage girl and the effect it has on the whole town.more
Another Picoult emotional undertow. The book immediately drug me under as a mother of a little girl to read about 9th grader Trixie and her friend at a sex party, then raped. Things I'm not sure I'll ever be ready to face and discuss with my own daughter but know I will have to. The story follows her struggle and that of her father, Daniel Stone - comic book inker, and her mother professor and expert of all things Dante's Inferno. Everyone's got secrets: Dad is running from his past growing up as the only white kid in an Alasakan Eskimo village and Mom, an affair with a student. I loved the incidental information about Eskimo life and comic books, some great research went into this book.more
14-year-old Trixie gets dumped by her boyfriend; she accuses him of sexual assault; Trixie runs away.more
The novel, The Tenth Circle, ecompasses that you shouldn't trust anyone that you don't really know. Trixie thought she knew her ex-boyfriend, but that was until he raped her at a party. In the beginning of the novel, Trixie lies to her father about going to a friend's house to have a sleepover. She was going to a friend's house, but not for a sleepover. She was going to over for a party, where something happens to Trixie that she could never imagine.Pgs. 80/387more
The novel, The Tenth Circle, encompasses the relentless change of growing up and lying to one's self. In the beginning, Trixie Stone, the protagonist, struggles with the devastating loss her boyfriend, Jason Underhill, who leaves her for Trixie's own benefit. Throughout the middle, she perserveres through the incident of being raped by Jason, and the mockery of her desperate actions to win him back. (289/385 pages)more
Reading her first novel, Jodi Picoult is truly an amazing writer. Her novel, The Tenth Circle shows how in an instant someone precious can be taken away from you, leaving you speechless. In the beginning, Trixie Stone experiences heartbreak with a boy from the hockey team. She feels so in love with him that she would go to great lengths to get him back. She threw herself at him a little too far because Jason Underhill has raped her. With the fact that Trixie's dad describes his life with the word hell, Trixie must get through high school with people thinking of her as someone they think she has become. The Tenth Circle has a blasting beginning, but dig your face into the book to see if it has a smooth landing. 385/385more
The novel, The Tenth Circle, by Jodi Picoult encompasses the theme that the most important gift in life, family, should stay together even admist the most horrible obstacles. In the beginning, Trixie Stone, struggles with the fact that her and her ex-boyfriend's love has ended. Throughout the middle, she perserveres through her rape from Daniel, her ex, her dysfunctional parents, and the suspicious judgements of the detective. 269/385more
As always, Picoult puts you right in the middle of a family tragedy. The emotions are raw and their challenges become real. Although "The Tenth Circle" was well developed and a good read, it was filled with too many "twists." Nothing was all that surprising, and you knew where it was going the whole time. Also, there's a comic book theme throughout, complete with the character's drawings and story, that annoyed me. I'm not a comic fan, so reading through it to see how it relates to the story was the worst part of the book. I'm sure I could have skipped the comic altogether and not lost any of the story plot.more
I either love or strongly dislike Jodi Picoult. This falls into the latter category.more
I loved this book, as I have most of the books by this author. I didn't like studying Dante when I was in school, but this story's comparison's of the family's situation to the circles of hell from Dante's Inferno were interesting. I changed my mind several times through the book about who I though the murderer was. I enjoyed that this book kept me guessing and changing my mind about what I thought the outcome would be.more
Tenth Circle. Jodie Picoult. 2006. If all of her novels are as full of plot twists as this one is, I see why Picoult is such a popular novelist. The plot revolves around the Stone family in the aftermath of teenage Trixie’s rape by her ex-boy friend. We find out about her father’s childhood as the only white boy in an Alaskan village and about her parents’ troubled marriage. Her stay-at-home father is a comic book artist, and her mother is a college literature teacher who teaches a popular course on Dante’s “Inferno.” The title is an allusion to Dante’s tenth circle of hell. Her father’s main character is a super hero on a trek through hell to find his daughter. This would be a great beach book!more
Long but good. I listened to it on audiobook and it was over 13 hours. Lock up your teenage daughters if you have them. If you're like me and don't have daughters, then just sit back and feel badly for your friends who do.more
While I enjoyed the story and the complex character development, I didn't enjoy this book as much as some other Jodi Picoult novels. The story of a girl who's boyfriend crosses the line and the unfortunate set of circumstances that result from those actions made for a real story. It was interesting to read the dynamic between parents and teenagers. I didn't think the comic strips were necessary. As I got further into the book, I started to skip them as they didn't add anything for me.more
This book was great :) :) though I think if I remember rightly I was confused by it!more
Like the other Picoult books I've read, this story deals with teenagers in adult situations - in this case, (alleged) rape. Usually the parents aren't quite this dysfunctional, but the lack of trust was actually kind of refreshing: I was never quite sure who was lying and why. I'm also glad the plot did not devolve into a lengthy court case, as it easily could have. I enjoyed this story, and especially liked the vivid descriptions of rural Alaskan life, but I didn't feel the inlaid comic book was all that necessary. I guess it was kind of neat to have that extra connection with the characters, but it didn't really add anything for me.more
One of Picoult's less engaging works.more
Read all 82 reviews

Reviews

I am not sure if I had read this before. Well done and well researched. It covers date-rape, adultery, running away from life, and family. Throw in an Ididorod like Alaskan mush race and a comic book penciller. Her writing is so good, she could write anything and it would read well, no matter how improbable.more
on Monday, July 07, 2008 I wrote about this book:

I started this book while on Holiday and finished it yesterday, the day I came home.
Really enjoyed it. The end was a bit a surprise for me but I like that. I like to be surprised.
9 out of 10more
Although I had read quite a number of Jodi Picoult books, I was doubtful about this one because it included a lot of the material in comic-strip format and I do not like comics or graphic novels at al. I needn't have worried though, because the story reads just as well just sticking to the text. In fact, especially after the tedious writing and despicable characters of Mercy, I was really surprised by some good storytelling and quite well-rounded characters. The research Picoult had put into modern adolescent sexual behaviour and into the lives of native Alaskans really enlivened the book. The only point that was a bit of a downer for me was that the ending was guessable and dealt with in matter of a few lines when I would have liked it to go on a bit more. Perhaps that is the mark of a good read - when you want it to go on a bit more!more
There really isn't much to say about this book. It wasn't bad, but it wasn't good either. There was nothing new or special about it. I didn't find any of the characters very likable, and it was pretty hard to follow in the sense that Picoult kept hinting at something else all the time, and eventually I lost track of what happened and what didn't happened.

The comic book strips were boring, and I skipped them all. There was far too much endless rambling about Daniel's career, and we are told far too many times that he hides his past- as if we didn't pick that up the first two times. Also, there were at least four sentences (supposedly ''deep'' sentences) that I swear I've read in other Picoult books, which annoyed me.

The ending was dreadfully written, as are all Picoult's endings. I am, however, rather anxious to read The Divine Comedy after this.more
This is a little different than other Picoult books I’ve read. Interspersed throughout this book is a graphic novel written by the main character, Daniel Stone, that mirrors the story. It adds to the authenticity of the story.I must admit, I had a hard time with this book. It’s about the tragedies of a 14 year-old. It was hard to read as the mother of a 15 year-old. But, I wanted to see how the characters moved through the events.It was not a happy story and didn’t end with all the problems tied into a neat bow. It was a story of a journey both internally and across the country. As the characters moved from the safety of what they knew in Bethel, Maine to the absolute unknown of Bethel, Alaska they each changed. Mom, Laura, Dad, Daniel and Daughter, Trixie, will never be the same. What they each learned on the journey became the most important part of this story.So - can I recommend it?? Not whole heartedly or without reservation. But, it is a story that haunts me and causes me to continue to pause and look more closely at the relationships in my own family.01/07more
This book was not one of my favorites of Picoult, but still made me want to speed through the book! Lots of drama and tragedy, similarly to other Picoult books, with Trixie having to deal with loss and judgement among other troubling things through out her teens. This book made me appreciate all the good things in my life.more
I read the book "The Tenth Circle" because I love the author, Jodi Picoult. I have read some of her books before and I couldn't put them down until I was finished with them. This book was exactly the same for me as all of the other ones. It makes you think a lot and makes you appreciate everything you have that is good.This story is about a young girl, Trixie, who gets date raped and what the reaction of her even-tempered father, Daniel, has to the situation. Daniel has hidden his past life from his daughter, but after the tragedy he can't keep himself under control. Trixie ends up running away and Daniel's life is turned upside down.The book all too well shows what happens in everyday life to some families. Life can be cruel to people and knowing how to deal with the unkindness is very important. Bad things do happen to good people and you might not think it will to you, but neither did Trixie or Daniel.I would recommend this book to anyone going through a hard time or probably just about any girl.more
I love Picoult books and have yet to find one that didn't grip me in an emotional tornado...until this book. While I was still swept up in the story it just didn't get to me like most of her books do. I didn't really like any of the characters and just couldn't achieve the connection that is normal for me in reading her books. I gave it a 4 stars but was just not into it enough for a 5.more
I really enjoyed this book. Jodi Picoult is one of my favorite authors. I really enjoyed how Picoult incorporated the animations within the pages.I wouldn't recommend watching the movie, It skips out the entire part where she goes to Alaska, and many other times. I believe that was a Lifetime movie.more
Because I loved My Sister's Keeper, I really wanted to love this book. I gave it 3 stars because oddly enough, I couldn't put it down. By the time I got to the last quarter of the book though, I wanted it to hurry up and end. When I want a book to never end, it's either because the ending is left open to interpretation or I fell in love with the characters. I never could fall in love with the characters in this book. All that said, it was a quick easy read that kept me hanging on for about 3/4 of the book.more
I predicted the end of this book, and then disregarded my hypothesis after reading some more. Not my favorite of Picoult's novels but as usual an interesting topic in regards to family and personal struggles.more
Of the four Jodi Picoult books I've read, I think I enjoyed this one the least. I wasn't a fan of the plot really, it got super complicated after a while and to me it started to feel a little bit dragged out. However, there were some parts of the book where I thought the writing was a little bit better than usual for Picoult, hence the three star rating.more
Compellingly readable. Jodi Picoult's books are hard to put down as you get swept into the topical family drama that she is sure to be writing on. This book deals with the possible rape of a teenage girl and the effect it has on the whole town.more
Another Picoult emotional undertow. The book immediately drug me under as a mother of a little girl to read about 9th grader Trixie and her friend at a sex party, then raped. Things I'm not sure I'll ever be ready to face and discuss with my own daughter but know I will have to. The story follows her struggle and that of her father, Daniel Stone - comic book inker, and her mother professor and expert of all things Dante's Inferno. Everyone's got secrets: Dad is running from his past growing up as the only white kid in an Alasakan Eskimo village and Mom, an affair with a student. I loved the incidental information about Eskimo life and comic books, some great research went into this book.more
14-year-old Trixie gets dumped by her boyfriend; she accuses him of sexual assault; Trixie runs away.more
The novel, The Tenth Circle, ecompasses that you shouldn't trust anyone that you don't really know. Trixie thought she knew her ex-boyfriend, but that was until he raped her at a party. In the beginning of the novel, Trixie lies to her father about going to a friend's house to have a sleepover. She was going to a friend's house, but not for a sleepover. She was going to over for a party, where something happens to Trixie that she could never imagine.Pgs. 80/387more
The novel, The Tenth Circle, encompasses the relentless change of growing up and lying to one's self. In the beginning, Trixie Stone, the protagonist, struggles with the devastating loss her boyfriend, Jason Underhill, who leaves her for Trixie's own benefit. Throughout the middle, she perserveres through the incident of being raped by Jason, and the mockery of her desperate actions to win him back. (289/385 pages)more
Reading her first novel, Jodi Picoult is truly an amazing writer. Her novel, The Tenth Circle shows how in an instant someone precious can be taken away from you, leaving you speechless. In the beginning, Trixie Stone experiences heartbreak with a boy from the hockey team. She feels so in love with him that she would go to great lengths to get him back. She threw herself at him a little too far because Jason Underhill has raped her. With the fact that Trixie's dad describes his life with the word hell, Trixie must get through high school with people thinking of her as someone they think she has become. The Tenth Circle has a blasting beginning, but dig your face into the book to see if it has a smooth landing. 385/385more
The novel, The Tenth Circle, by Jodi Picoult encompasses the theme that the most important gift in life, family, should stay together even admist the most horrible obstacles. In the beginning, Trixie Stone, struggles with the fact that her and her ex-boyfriend's love has ended. Throughout the middle, she perserveres through her rape from Daniel, her ex, her dysfunctional parents, and the suspicious judgements of the detective. 269/385more
As always, Picoult puts you right in the middle of a family tragedy. The emotions are raw and their challenges become real. Although "The Tenth Circle" was well developed and a good read, it was filled with too many "twists." Nothing was all that surprising, and you knew where it was going the whole time. Also, there's a comic book theme throughout, complete with the character's drawings and story, that annoyed me. I'm not a comic fan, so reading through it to see how it relates to the story was the worst part of the book. I'm sure I could have skipped the comic altogether and not lost any of the story plot.more
I either love or strongly dislike Jodi Picoult. This falls into the latter category.more
I loved this book, as I have most of the books by this author. I didn't like studying Dante when I was in school, but this story's comparison's of the family's situation to the circles of hell from Dante's Inferno were interesting. I changed my mind several times through the book about who I though the murderer was. I enjoyed that this book kept me guessing and changing my mind about what I thought the outcome would be.more
Tenth Circle. Jodie Picoult. 2006. If all of her novels are as full of plot twists as this one is, I see why Picoult is such a popular novelist. The plot revolves around the Stone family in the aftermath of teenage Trixie’s rape by her ex-boy friend. We find out about her father’s childhood as the only white boy in an Alaskan village and about her parents’ troubled marriage. Her stay-at-home father is a comic book artist, and her mother is a college literature teacher who teaches a popular course on Dante’s “Inferno.” The title is an allusion to Dante’s tenth circle of hell. Her father’s main character is a super hero on a trek through hell to find his daughter. This would be a great beach book!more
Long but good. I listened to it on audiobook and it was over 13 hours. Lock up your teenage daughters if you have them. If you're like me and don't have daughters, then just sit back and feel badly for your friends who do.more
While I enjoyed the story and the complex character development, I didn't enjoy this book as much as some other Jodi Picoult novels. The story of a girl who's boyfriend crosses the line and the unfortunate set of circumstances that result from those actions made for a real story. It was interesting to read the dynamic between parents and teenagers. I didn't think the comic strips were necessary. As I got further into the book, I started to skip them as they didn't add anything for me.more
This book was great :) :) though I think if I remember rightly I was confused by it!more
Like the other Picoult books I've read, this story deals with teenagers in adult situations - in this case, (alleged) rape. Usually the parents aren't quite this dysfunctional, but the lack of trust was actually kind of refreshing: I was never quite sure who was lying and why. I'm also glad the plot did not devolve into a lengthy court case, as it easily could have. I enjoyed this story, and especially liked the vivid descriptions of rural Alaskan life, but I didn't feel the inlaid comic book was all that necessary. I guess it was kind of neat to have that extra connection with the characters, but it didn't really add anything for me.more
One of Picoult's less engaging works.more
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