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From the Publisher

Good memory isn’t a gift, it’s a skill you can develop. Memory Power shows you how.

Ever forget where you put your car keys? Or forget a name five seconds after meeting someone? Blank in the middle of a presentation or test? Forgetting is normal but it’s not inevitable. Memory Power provides the solution to unleash your inner genius.

Scott Hagwood is a four-time National Memory Champion, but he wasn’t born with photographic recall. At age thirty-six he underwent radiation treatment for cancer, which his doctors warned might cause memory loss.

Hagwood was determined to beat the odds, so he began to stretch and work his memory like a muscle. He soon learned that simple daily memory drills could restore and even boost his ability to remember faces, numbers, and text. His exercise plan was so effective that eventually his brain began to change physically, becoming more efficient in areas associated with memory.

Now Hagwood shares with you the easy-to-learn techniques he used to go from average Joe to the first American Grand Master of Memory. You may think you’re forgetful or absentminded, but you, too, can tap into your latent but very real memory power.

Topics: Cognitive Science, Tips & Tricks, Inspirational, Cancer, Guides, and Prescriptive

Published: Free Press on
ISBN: 9780743282420
List price: $7.99
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