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Editor’s Note

“Poetic lyricism…”

Bob Dylan’s fevered, poetic lyricism finds a voice in prose in this arresting memoir. Filled with anecdotes and insights, it feels at once lovingly crafted and utterly spontaneous—much like his greatest songs.
Scribd Editor
The celebrated first memoir from arguably the most influential singer-songwriter in the country, Bob Dylan.

"I'd come from a long ways off and had started a long ways down. But now destiny was about to manifest itself. I felt like it was looking right at me and nobody else."

So writes Bob Dylan in Chronicles: Volume One, his remarkable book exploring critical junctures in his life and career. Through Dylan's eyes and open mind, we see Greenwich Village, circa 1961, when he first arrives in Manhattan. Dylan's New York is a magical city of possibilities -- smoky, nightlong parties; literary awakenings; transient loves and unbreakable friendships. Elegiac observations are punctuated by jabs of memories, penetrating and tough. With the book's side trips to New Orleans, Woodstock, Minnesota and points west, Chronicles: Volume One is an intimate and intensely personal recollection of extraordinary times.

By turns revealing, poetical, passionate and witty, Chronicles: Volume One is a mesmerizing window on Bob Dylan's thoughts and influences. Dylan's voice is distinctively American: generous of spirit, engaged, fanciful and rhythmic. Utilizing his unparalleled gifts of storytelling and the exquisite expressiveness that are the hallmarks of his music, Bob Dylan turns Chronicles: Volume One into a poignant reflection on life, and the people and places that helped shape the man and the art.

Topics: Counterculture, United States of America, New York City, 1960s, Lyrical, Music, Musicians, Rock 'n' Roll, Pop Music, 20th Century, and American Author

Published: Simon & Schuster on
ISBN: 9780743272582
List price: $11.99
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Great, great book. Dylan doesn't cover what the gossip columnists want to hear, instead giving readers a glimpse into the way he thinks and feels.more
Fantastic to find out from Dylan, in his own words, that he was always surprised by and rejected the messianic adulation of some of his listeners. He never felt himself to be some great liberal.more
This is a really intimate book, it is clear that Dylan gives it everything he's got to make it as truly auto-biographical as possible. As you would expect from Dylan it is stunningly written and occasionally makes you stop just to admire his ability to write even in this format. One thing is for certain, if you like Dylan's music and haven't read this you are doing yourself an injustice. Finally this book is responsible for introducing me to the music of Woody Guthrie and that really isn't any bad thing!more
Book club selection. Was a very disjointed account of Bob Dylan's life... reading this, you'd think he was the epitome of the family man, just a little drink now and then. It jumps from experience to experience ... not exactly a chronological chronicle.more
Read all 27 reviews

Reviews

Great, great book. Dylan doesn't cover what the gossip columnists want to hear, instead giving readers a glimpse into the way he thinks and feels.more
Fantastic to find out from Dylan, in his own words, that he was always surprised by and rejected the messianic adulation of some of his listeners. He never felt himself to be some great liberal.more
This is a really intimate book, it is clear that Dylan gives it everything he's got to make it as truly auto-biographical as possible. As you would expect from Dylan it is stunningly written and occasionally makes you stop just to admire his ability to write even in this format. One thing is for certain, if you like Dylan's music and haven't read this you are doing yourself an injustice. Finally this book is responsible for introducing me to the music of Woody Guthrie and that really isn't any bad thing!more
Book club selection. Was a very disjointed account of Bob Dylan's life... reading this, you'd think he was the epitome of the family man, just a little drink now and then. It jumps from experience to experience ... not exactly a chronological chronicle.more
My daughter had me buy this book at a thrift store for her son, who is interested in music, but not pursuing it very systematically. I discovered that in fact I already had a copy, but never read it. My observations, which are a bit different is my facination with his descriptions. He loves to describe places and there are excellent descriptions . He also adds interesting tidbits...too bad no index...the sad life of Robert E Lee's father who was disfigured by lye and ended up in the West Indies, a description of trains " I'd seen and heard trains from my earliest childhoodand the sight and sound of them always made me feel secure" (I can identify with this, a train running near my house). His description of living as a young child through World War II rang true to me, as I did too. "If you were born around this time you could feel the old world go and the new one beginning" .(Yes, yes..it was really like that).He refers to the radio as "the sountrack of my life".Then his descriptions of libraries. He devotes 12 pages to a personal library he visits (Library thingers....what effect is your library having on others that you do not even know about ?). There is even a wonderful description of the New York Public Library, Too bad there is no index to this book. Once Dylan became well known he met a lot of famous people and has interesting observations...Archibald MacLeich, John Wayne and of course Joan Baez and other musicians.Excellent, excellent, a book to dip into from time to time.more
This book is rich with references and lesson in American history and pop culture and literature. Bob Dylan may not be formally educated, but his depth of knowledge is fascinating. From this book I learned that Bob Dylan is a down-to-earth man who, during his life and career, just wanted to play his music. Nothing more, nothing less. I also learned that Spike Lee's father was a professional bass player.more
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