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Enriched Classics offer readers accessible editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and commentary. Each book includes educational tools alongside the text, enabling students and readers alike to gain a deeper and more developed understanding of the writer and their work.

Set in nineteenth-century England, Great Expectations is Dickens’s timeless tale of an orphan boy’s extraordinary journey through life.

Enriched Classics enhance your engagement by introducing and explaining the historical and cultural significance of the work, the author’s personal history, and what impact this book had on subsequent scholarship. Each book includes discussion questions that help clarify and reinforce major themes and reading recommendations for further research.

Read with confidence.

Topics: Orphans, Coming of Age, Poverty, Wealth, Revenge, Adventurous, Melodramatic, Psychological, Suspenseful, Dark, Gothic, First Person Narration, Victorian Era, England, Bildungsroman, Novella, and Unrequited Love

Published: Pocket Books on May 28, 2004
ISBN: 9781416503002
List price: $5.99
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I still like this story. Dickens always seems lame until I read him. Then I remember why he was the Stephen King/Tom Clancy of 19th Century Britain (in that he sold well and was long-winded). At least Dickens came right out and attacked the system.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Wow. Just...wow. I can't even begin to explain how good this book was. But I'll try :PFor those who don't know the basic story, Pip is an orphan raised by his sister and her husband. One day at the age of seven, as he discovers the graves of his dead parents and siblings, he is threatened by a convict into stealing some food and a file to feed and free the man. Pip, frightened half to death, does as he is told.Much later in life, he becomes suddenly wealthy at the hands of his benefactor, a person who's name he his not allowed to know. Assuming it to be Miss Havisham, the crazy old lady he's been visiting lately, as a scheme to make him a gentleman for her adopted daughter Estella, he leaves his old life, and the only people who have ever cared for him, thoughtlessly behind in pursuit of the old lady's beautiful daughter.What a beautifully told story. Dickens's prose is near magical and, though definitely not modern, extremely easy to follow. I loved Pip, despite his horrid faults. He's arrogant and selfish, but that's the point. Dickens wrote about the tragedies he saw every day: people desiring material wealth at the expense of those around them, heartless people wanting only to hurt others, the taking for granted of beautiful friendships, the judgement of good people based on looks or wealth alone (hmm, this kind of sounds like today). Though Pip is the main character and the one who we are supposed to identify with the most, he embodies most of these traits. He is a truly flawed character that reminds me of most people I know. Through him, we make the same mistakes he does but we also learn as he learns. To judge Pip's character is to judge your own. When Pip comes into his inheritance, he officially rises to a position higher than Joe, his sister's husband and the only one who loved him through most of his childhood. Pip becomes wealthy and educated, he starts to look down upon Joe's simple, blacksmith ways. He disregards Joe's feelings, hurting him terribly, because Joe does not fit into his new society. Joe embarrasses Pip so Pip will not stand his company. How many teenagers/young adults does this remind you of? Though most people treat it as a normal symptom of growing up (and I'll admit to being guilty of it myself), it's a real eye-opener to truly see the effects of one's thoughtless behavior. That's what this entire book is about: thoughtlessness. It is my belief that Dickens wanted people to think about others and to realize what is really important, and that's the people you share your life with. It's nice to have money, but money comes and goes. Your parents, siblings, children, aunts and uncles only have so much time before they're gone, so treasure them.I admit that I'm a very materialistic person. It's gotten me into a lot of trouble financially and I'm not proud of my situation at the moment. I think it's fantastic that I found this book, focusing so much on moving away from materialistic wealth and towards true riches, at a second hand store for only $.10. Normally, when I finish a book, I put it back on the shelf. This one, however, I'm leaving out on my desk where I will see it everyday. Great Expectations will act as a reminder for me as to what kind of life I want to start living.I don't think this review did this book justice, but I don't care. At the moment it's late and after finishing this book, I feel I need to have a long heart to heart with my mom.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I was skeptical of this book as sadly I have not often found myself to be a fan of "classic" literature. However, this book was very well written. The language does make it a difficult read in that even the most trivial of phrases feels heavy as if it needs contemplation and/or interpretation.Throughout the novel we see the development of Pip from a young boy to an adult. As the story is told via first-person we are able to witness Pip's intellectual and emotional maturation as his external circumstances change.In many ways this is a sad novel. Pip's pride and ambitions often get in the way of his developing the relationships that he ultimately discovers are his true treasures. However, it is these relationships that remain by his side in his times of trouble despite his shunning of them to increase his status in general and specifically in the eyes of Estella. It is for Estella that Pip initially develops ambitions and it is his pursuit of her that has him abandon his loved-ones and his known lifestyle.When Pip learns who his benefactor is, it is Estella's opinion that he worries about. However, I believe that it is in caring for his benefactor that Pip learns what is truly important.SPOILER: Yet, at the end of the novel, Pip once again leaves Joe and Biddy because they don't fit into the plans he had developed. I'm not sure Pip ever has an unconditional relationship with anyone. Herbert would be the closest.At the end of the novel, Pip is finally able to say good-bye to Estella. Is it because he has seen her broken? Is it because of time? Is it because his new plan is to never wed? Or is it because he had finally learned what a real relationship should be? Does he choose not to marry because he doesn't believe he is capable of this type of relationship?Overall a good book. I especially enjoyed the adult Pip's representations of the childhood Pip's thoughts. Although this is not an overly-long book, it did take longer for me to read due to the language and because, although it is a good and interesting rendering of relationships and individual development, I would not consider it a page-turner.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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I still like this story. Dickens always seems lame until I read him. Then I remember why he was the Stephen King/Tom Clancy of 19th Century Britain (in that he sold well and was long-winded). At least Dickens came right out and attacked the system.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Wow. Just...wow. I can't even begin to explain how good this book was. But I'll try :PFor those who don't know the basic story, Pip is an orphan raised by his sister and her husband. One day at the age of seven, as he discovers the graves of his dead parents and siblings, he is threatened by a convict into stealing some food and a file to feed and free the man. Pip, frightened half to death, does as he is told.Much later in life, he becomes suddenly wealthy at the hands of his benefactor, a person who's name he his not allowed to know. Assuming it to be Miss Havisham, the crazy old lady he's been visiting lately, as a scheme to make him a gentleman for her adopted daughter Estella, he leaves his old life, and the only people who have ever cared for him, thoughtlessly behind in pursuit of the old lady's beautiful daughter.What a beautifully told story. Dickens's prose is near magical and, though definitely not modern, extremely easy to follow. I loved Pip, despite his horrid faults. He's arrogant and selfish, but that's the point. Dickens wrote about the tragedies he saw every day: people desiring material wealth at the expense of those around them, heartless people wanting only to hurt others, the taking for granted of beautiful friendships, the judgement of good people based on looks or wealth alone (hmm, this kind of sounds like today). Though Pip is the main character and the one who we are supposed to identify with the most, he embodies most of these traits. He is a truly flawed character that reminds me of most people I know. Through him, we make the same mistakes he does but we also learn as he learns. To judge Pip's character is to judge your own. When Pip comes into his inheritance, he officially rises to a position higher than Joe, his sister's husband and the only one who loved him through most of his childhood. Pip becomes wealthy and educated, he starts to look down upon Joe's simple, blacksmith ways. He disregards Joe's feelings, hurting him terribly, because Joe does not fit into his new society. Joe embarrasses Pip so Pip will not stand his company. How many teenagers/young adults does this remind you of? Though most people treat it as a normal symptom of growing up (and I'll admit to being guilty of it myself), it's a real eye-opener to truly see the effects of one's thoughtless behavior. That's what this entire book is about: thoughtlessness. It is my belief that Dickens wanted people to think about others and to realize what is really important, and that's the people you share your life with. It's nice to have money, but money comes and goes. Your parents, siblings, children, aunts and uncles only have so much time before they're gone, so treasure them.I admit that I'm a very materialistic person. It's gotten me into a lot of trouble financially and I'm not proud of my situation at the moment. I think it's fantastic that I found this book, focusing so much on moving away from materialistic wealth and towards true riches, at a second hand store for only $.10. Normally, when I finish a book, I put it back on the shelf. This one, however, I'm leaving out on my desk where I will see it everyday. Great Expectations will act as a reminder for me as to what kind of life I want to start living.I don't think this review did this book justice, but I don't care. At the moment it's late and after finishing this book, I feel I need to have a long heart to heart with my mom.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I was skeptical of this book as sadly I have not often found myself to be a fan of "classic" literature. However, this book was very well written. The language does make it a difficult read in that even the most trivial of phrases feels heavy as if it needs contemplation and/or interpretation.Throughout the novel we see the development of Pip from a young boy to an adult. As the story is told via first-person we are able to witness Pip's intellectual and emotional maturation as his external circumstances change.In many ways this is a sad novel. Pip's pride and ambitions often get in the way of his developing the relationships that he ultimately discovers are his true treasures. However, it is these relationships that remain by his side in his times of trouble despite his shunning of them to increase his status in general and specifically in the eyes of Estella. It is for Estella that Pip initially develops ambitions and it is his pursuit of her that has him abandon his loved-ones and his known lifestyle.When Pip learns who his benefactor is, it is Estella's opinion that he worries about. However, I believe that it is in caring for his benefactor that Pip learns what is truly important.SPOILER: Yet, at the end of the novel, Pip once again leaves Joe and Biddy because they don't fit into the plans he had developed. I'm not sure Pip ever has an unconditional relationship with anyone. Herbert would be the closest.At the end of the novel, Pip is finally able to say good-bye to Estella. Is it because he has seen her broken? Is it because of time? Is it because his new plan is to never wed? Or is it because he had finally learned what a real relationship should be? Does he choose not to marry because he doesn't believe he is capable of this type of relationship?Overall a good book. I especially enjoyed the adult Pip's representations of the childhood Pip's thoughts. Although this is not an overly-long book, it did take longer for me to read due to the language and because, although it is a good and interesting rendering of relationships and individual development, I would not consider it a page-turner.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Dickens is just not really my thing. Too long and slow with characters I just do not relate to or care about.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The story is about a boy, named Pip, who is raised by his evil sister and Joe her kindhearted husband. They lived in poverty. So when Miss Havisham a rich eccentric woman asks Pip to come to her house just to see him playing and offers some money for it, his family is more than willing to fulfill Miss Havisham’s wish. She is disillusioned in love; her beautiful stepdaughter, who was raised to break men’s hearts, is selfish and unable to love anyone. She is a cold-hearted master manipulator. So when Pip sees the girl for the first time he falls in love with her. He doesn’t hope that she will love him back because he is poor and uneducated, he doesn’t think he is good enough for her. About the same time there were two escaped convicts from the jail and Pip happens to meet one of them named Magwitch. Pip was frightened after such a meeting and was forced into helping Magwitch to get some food. After Pip helps him, a few days later he finds out that Magwitch is back in jail again. Years later after trying to forget this encounter, an attorney appears at his family’s house. He introduces himself as the legal representative of a wealthy person who wants to remain anonymous. That person wants to make a gentleman out of Pip, by educate him and leaving him a fortune. Everyone in Pip’s family is thankful and excited, but wondering who that person could be. The only person they can think of is Miss Havisham, but what a shock when they discover who that person is…This is quite a thick book, so I needed some time to get the courage to start reading it. I had heard it could be long and boring, but was happy to find it enjoyable and easy to read. I know many people might disagree with me on that, but I think Dickens lovers will appreciate this great novel.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Back in high school, I always found Dickens to be rather tedious, but in my adulthood, I gained a greater appreciation of his work. Audiobooks were the key--I discovered that his prose style worked far better for me read aloud that on the page. And so, despite owning the paperback, I listened to the audiobook instead.I wasn't wowed by Great Expectations, but I enjoyed it. Most interesting to me was the glimpse of (lower) middle class life during the time period, something that many novels avoid, preferring to focus on the affairs of the very wealthy or very poor.As is typical with Dickens, there are a number of unlikely coincidences and connections between characters. These are less satisfying to the modern audience than they no doubt were to the original readers. They are also typical of a serial format--modern television shows also tend to let loose those sorts of revelations, to sate an audience hungry for twists.Slow to get going and without a great deal of action, I continued to listen because of the interesting characters and a desire to find out what happened to Pip, even as he got less sympathetic throughout the course of the novel.I'm glad this was not my first introduction to Dickens, but I'm glad to have experienced it nonetheless.
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