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ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATED
BY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIP


Alexandre Dumas's thrilling adventure of one man's quest for freedom and vengeance on those who betrayed him.

EACH ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES:
A concise introduction that gives readers important background information
A chronology of the author's life and work
A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context
An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations
Detailed explanatory notes
Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work
Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction
A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience

Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world's finest books to their full potential.
SERIES EDITED BY CYNTHIA BRANTLEY JOHNSON

Topics: Paris

Published: Pocket Books on May 1, 2004
ISBN: 9781416501800
List price: $6.95
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The greatest book ever written in my own, ever so humble, opinion. A 1400 page book that is also an incredibly suspenseful page-turner--beware, it will effect your sleeping habits.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
How can you read 1243 pages and wish there were more? That's the way I felt about this book. I loved it!!! Action-packed clear through - never a boring moment. I will confess that I was picturing James Caviezel through the whole reading - even though the book is so different from the movie. This definitely moves right to my top 5 list. I read a quote a while ago that said, "Don't judge a person by the books they read, judge them by the books they re-read." This one will definitely be re-read!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I have read and enjoyed very long books previously (Anna Karenina, Vanity Fair), but loved none of them as much as The Count of Monte Cristo. The plot that Dumas weaves is intricate and fascinating, and all the more impressive given that you know the narrative arc from the beginning: the overwhelming bulk of the book is the process of Edmond Dantes exacting his revenge. It's the journey that makes this book so amazing; as we watch Dantes/ TCOMC weave the web from which all his betrayers will be unable to escape, it's very hard to look away. In short, an absolute power house of an adventure novel.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

The greatest book ever written in my own, ever so humble, opinion. A 1400 page book that is also an incredibly suspenseful page-turner--beware, it will effect your sleeping habits.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
How can you read 1243 pages and wish there were more? That's the way I felt about this book. I loved it!!! Action-packed clear through - never a boring moment. I will confess that I was picturing James Caviezel through the whole reading - even though the book is so different from the movie. This definitely moves right to my top 5 list. I read a quote a while ago that said, "Don't judge a person by the books they read, judge them by the books they re-read." This one will definitely be re-read!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I have read and enjoyed very long books previously (Anna Karenina, Vanity Fair), but loved none of them as much as The Count of Monte Cristo. The plot that Dumas weaves is intricate and fascinating, and all the more impressive given that you know the narrative arc from the beginning: the overwhelming bulk of the book is the process of Edmond Dantes exacting his revenge. It's the journey that makes this book so amazing; as we watch Dantes/ TCOMC weave the web from which all his betrayers will be unable to escape, it's very hard to look away. In short, an absolute power house of an adventure novel.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book might be massive - but don't be put off. It's fantastic! Written by Dumas as a serialisation (hence the length) the betrayal and subsequent revenge of Edmund Dantes unfolds chapter by chapter.It's impossible not to care about Dantes and want to see what happens to him, the descriptions of his time in Chateau d'if are brilliant, and the stories of his life after escape are wonderfully told. Watch one of the film adaptations if you must - but read the book as well. Robin Buss's translation is excellent.I've read many books but this has to be my absolute favourite.
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Edmond Dantès, a young and successful merchant sailor recently granted his own command by his dying captain Leclère, returns to Marseille to marry his fiancée Mercédès. Leclère, a supporter of the exiled Napoléon I, charges Dantès on his deathbed to deliver two objects: a package to Maréchal Bertrand (who had been exiled with Napoleon Bonaparte to the isle of Elba), and a letter from Elba to an unknown man in Paris. Subsequently, an anonymous letter accuses Dantès of being a Bonapartist traitor. The letter is later revealed to have been written by Mercédès' cousin Fernand Mondego and Danglars, Dantès' ship's supercargo. Villefort, the deputy crown prosecutor in Marseille, assumes the duty of investigating the matter. Villefort is normally considered a just man, but on discovering that the recipient of the letter from Elba is his Bonapartist father, he ultimately chooses to save his political career and condemns Dantès without trial to life imprisonment and protects his father by destroying the incriminating letter.During his fourteen years imprisonment in the Château d'If, Edmond is visited in his cell by the Abbé Faria, a priest and fellow prisoner trying to tunnel his way to freedom. Faria had been imprisoned for proposing a united Italy. . After Faria's death the following year, Dantès escapes and is rescued by a smuggling ship. After several months of working with the smugglers, he gets the opportunity to go to Monte Cristo for a goods exchange. Dantès fakes an injury and convinces the smugglers to temporarily leave him on Monte Cristo. He then makes his way to the hiding place of the treasure. He returns to Marseilles, where he learns that his father has died in poverty. He buys himself a yacht and hides the rest of the treasure on board. With his new found wealth and education, Dantès buys the island of Monte Cristo and the title of Count from the Tuscan Government.
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I first read this book in high school and have re-read numerous times over the last 35 years. It is my favorite. One book that contains it all...adventure, despair, revenge, justice, romance.
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