Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
Enriched Classics offer readers accessible editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and commentary. Each book includes educational tools alongside the text, enabling students and readers alike to gain a deeper and more developed understanding of the writer and their work.

Upton Sinclair’s unflinching chronicle of crushing poverty and oppression set in Chicago in the early 1900s. A landmark work of social commentary, Sinclair’s work diligently exposes the inhumane and brutal sides of capitalism.

Enriched Classics enhance your engagement by introducing and explaining the historical and cultural significance of the work, the author’s personal history, and what impact this book had on subsequent scholarship. Each book includes discussion questions that help clarify and reinforce major themes and reading recommendations for further research.

Read with confidence.
Published: Pocket Books on
ISBN: 9781416503026
List price: $5.95
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Jungle
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
I feel this would make an excellent play. The main character arrives in America and something akin to with arms like these how can I ever starve. Then slowly the tragedy sets in with misfortune after misfortune. The main character is subject to the pitfalls of a crooked city and his hope is dashed repeatedly by a cruel reality. He attempts to get work shovelling and his spirits are raised for an instant when the employer calls him to work. However, when his sleeves are rolled up they reveals weak and pale arms and he is sent away. It is after his body has been exploited and rendered useless that his mind opens to the preachings of socialism that the author wished to disseminate to the reader.more
I feel this would make an excellent play. The main character arrives in America and something akin to with arms like these how can I ever starve. Then slowly the tragedy sets in with misfortune after misfortune. The main character is subject to the pitfalls of a crooked city and his hope is dashed repeatedly by a cruel reality. He attempts to get work shovelling and his spirits are raised for an instant when the employer calls him to work. However, when his sleeves are rolled up they reveals weak and pale arms and he is sent away. It is after his body has been exploited and rendered useless that his mind opens to the preachings of socialism that the author wished to disseminate to the reader.more
The graphic novel adaptation took me about 10 minutes to read. But as other reviewers have noted the book is about the plight of immigrants. It just happened to be set in a meat packing plant. It makes one realize that undocumented immigrants today are only a little better of than those in The Jungle. Although today's meat packing plants are better we would still be disgusted by them. Don't get me started on factory farms.more
The graphic novel adaptation took me about 10 minutes to read. But as other reviewers have noted the book is about the plight of immigrants. It just happened to be set in a meat packing plant. It makes one realize that undocumented immigrants today are only a little better of than those in The Jungle. Although today's meat packing plants are better we would still be disgusted by them. Don't get me started on factory farms.more
The first 2/3 of the book was heart-wrenching. Sinclair is an incredible story-teller. The last third of the book however...yawn. At that point, I just wanted to scream "get on with it!"The last few chapters were just too muddled and preachy for my taste.more
The first 2/3 of the book was heart-wrenching. Sinclair is an incredible story-teller. The last third of the book however...yawn. At that point, I just wanted to scream "get on with it!"The last few chapters were just too muddled and preachy for my taste.more
The first 2/3 of the book was heart-wrenching. Sinclair is an incredible story-teller. The last third of the book however...yawn. At that point, I just wanted to scream "get on with it!"The last few chapters were just too muddled and preachy for my taste.more
I can just imagine the furore this book caused when it came out. The descriptions of the conditions at the meat packing plants in Chicago, which Sinclair knew from having gone undercover, were horrendous. As a result of this book the forerunner to the Food and Drugs Act was passed. At least as terrible as how meat was processed was how horribly the workers were treated. There was no such thing as health and safety or worker's compensation. If someone didn't turn up for work there were 100 more people to take their place. Wages were low and people went into debt to live in squalor. Children either worked in the meat packing plants or were sent out to sell papers. Women who had given birth had to go right back to work or lose their job. The protagonist lost everything, tried crime and strike breaking, and finally discovered socialism. Now, the promises and schemes the socialists made seem naive but to millions of the poor it must have seen like a beacon of light.more
I can just imagine the furore this book caused when it came out. The descriptions of the conditions at the meat packing plants in Chicago, which Sinclair knew from having gone undercover, were horrendous. As a result of this book the forerunner to the Food and Drugs Act was passed. At least as terrible as how meat was processed was how horribly the workers were treated. There was no such thing as health and safety or worker's compensation. If someone didn't turn up for work there were 100 more people to take their place. Wages were low and people went into debt to live in squalor. Children either worked in the meat packing plants or were sent out to sell papers. Women who had given birth had to go right back to work or lose their job. The protagonist lost everything, tried crime and strike breaking, and finally discovered socialism. Now, the promises and schemes the socialists made seem naive but to millions of the poor it must have seen like a beacon of light.more
I can just imagine the furore this book caused when it came out. The descriptions of the conditions at the meat packing plants in Chicago, which Sinclair knew from having gone undercover, were horrendous. As a result of this book the forerunner to the Food and Drugs Act was passed. At least as terrible as how meat was processed was how horribly the workers were treated. There was no such thing as health and safety or worker's compensation. If someone didn't turn up for work there were 100 more people to take their place. Wages were low and people went into debt to live in squalor. Children either worked in the meat packing plants or were sent out to sell papers. Women who had given birth had to go right back to work or lose their job. The protagonist lost everything, tried crime and strike breaking, and finally discovered socialism. Now, the promises and schemes the socialists made seem naive but to millions of the poor it must have seen like a beacon of light.more
Wow! They call it "muckraking journalism" (apparently), and the level of detail used by Sinclair to denounce malpractice in the meatpacking industry of early 20th century Chicago is truly staggering. The author himself claims that his real target was the exploitation and mistreatment of poor immigrants to the U.S. (the plot focuses on the plight of a family from Lithuania), but I can only believe that up to a point.It all makes for fascinating reading, and having visited Chicago, I simply had to use Google Maps to "rediscover" the streets mentioned in the text! Some readers (not myself) might be put off by the fact that Sinclair's in-depth exploration of a) meatpacking procedures and b) socialism actually take precedence over the plot itself.more
Well... this is definitely a book that arouses emotion and thought.When first starting The Jungle, I was impressed and moved by Upton Sinclair's writing. I felt like I'd been reading for forever and nothing had happened, but I still found it interesting because of the way it was written. But I'd talked to people who had read the book, so I knew tragedy couldn't be far away.Tragedy after tragedy strikes the characters until it seems like things just cannot get any worse. In fact, things get a little better, but then worse again. Better! Worse. Better! Worse. It gets tiring, to say the least.Upton Sinclair's writing never gets any less amazing, but I can take only so much tragedy and vehement heartbreak at a time. But, at least, I got to the end, and I felt a little...startled. It seems that Upton Sinclair wrote this entire tragedy just to convert readers to Socialism. And after reading the Afterward, I discovered that my impulse was correct: that was indeed Upton Sinclair's goal.I feel a little cheated, honestly. There's no denying that the fifty million speeches about Socialism at the end of The Jungle are inspiring and moved me to take a stand and do something to change my life, but then it just keeps going and you can tell Upton Sinclair is even more excited about Socialism than about all the tragedy of Chicago and the Rudkus family.The Jungle has definitely made me think, and it has definitely made me feel. But I can't say I agree with Upton Sinclair on all his political views, and I kind of wish he hadn't used his writing to sneak up on me and throw his ideas in my face.more
Well... this is definitely a book that arouses emotion and thought.When first starting The Jungle, I was impressed and moved by Upton Sinclair's writing. I felt like I'd been reading for forever and nothing had happened, but I still found it interesting because of the way it was written. But I'd talked to people who had read the book, so I knew tragedy couldn't be far away.Tragedy after tragedy strikes the characters until it seems like things just cannot get any worse. In fact, things get a little better, but then worse again. Better! Worse. Better! Worse. It gets tiring, to say the least.Upton Sinclair's writing never gets any less amazing, but I can take only so much tragedy and vehement heartbreak at a time. But, at least, I got to the end, and I felt a little...startled. It seems that Upton Sinclair wrote this entire tragedy just to convert readers to Socialism. And after reading the Afterward, I discovered that my impulse was correct: that was indeed Upton Sinclair's goal.I feel a little cheated, honestly. There's no denying that the fifty million speeches about Socialism at the end of The Jungle are inspiring and moved me to take a stand and do something to change my life, but then it just keeps going and you can tell Upton Sinclair is even more excited about Socialism than about all the tragedy of Chicago and the Rudkus family.The Jungle has definitely made me think, and it has definitely made me feel. But I can't say I agree with Upton Sinclair on all his political views, and I kind of wish he hadn't used his writing to sneak up on me and throw his ideas in my face.more
Well... this is definitely a book that arouses emotion and thought.When first starting The Jungle, I was impressed and moved by Upton Sinclair's writing. I felt like I'd been reading for forever and nothing had happened, but I still found it interesting because of the way it was written. But I'd talked to people who had read the book, so I knew tragedy couldn't be far away.Tragedy after tragedy strikes the characters until it seems like things just cannot get any worse. In fact, things get a little better, but then worse again. Better! Worse. Better! Worse. It gets tiring, to say the least.Upton Sinclair's writing never gets any less amazing, but I can take only so much tragedy and vehement heartbreak at a time. But, at least, I got to the end, and I felt a little...startled. It seems that Upton Sinclair wrote this entire tragedy just to convert readers to Socialism. And after reading the Afterward, I discovered that my impulse was correct: that was indeed Upton Sinclair's goal.I feel a little cheated, honestly. There's no denying that the fifty million speeches about Socialism at the end of The Jungle are inspiring and moved me to take a stand and do something to change my life, but then it just keeps going and you can tell Upton Sinclair is even more excited about Socialism than about all the tragedy of Chicago and the Rudkus family.The Jungle has definitely made me think, and it has definitely made me feel. But I can't say I agree with Upton Sinclair on all his political views, and I kind of wish he hadn't used his writing to sneak up on me and throw his ideas in my face.more
It was well written and has a hidden point, however it was the most boring and highly depressing book i have ever read. i'm glad that i read it, but i will not be reading it again or recommending it to others.more
It was well written and has a hidden point, however it was the most boring and highly depressing book i have ever read. i'm glad that i read it, but i will not be reading it again or recommending it to others.more
It was well written and has a hidden point, however it was the most boring and highly depressing book i have ever read. i'm glad that i read it, but i will not be reading it again or recommending it to others.more
I very much enjoyed this novel. Jurgus Rudkus is introduced as a large, strong, proud man. His struggles, tragedies, and downfalls show him transform from someone strong, powerful, and almost invincible to someone completely and totally broken down.The novel ends in a deus ex machina fashion, and seems to have very little connection with what has preceded it. But nevertheless, this one is worth reading.more
I very much enjoyed this novel. Jurgus Rudkus is introduced as a large, strong, proud man. His struggles, tragedies, and downfalls show him transform from someone strong, powerful, and almost invincible to someone completely and totally broken down.The novel ends in a deus ex machina fashion, and seems to have very little connection with what has preceded it. But nevertheless, this one is worth reading.more
I very much enjoyed this novel. Jurgus Rudkus is introduced as a large, strong, proud man. His struggles, tragedies, and downfalls show him transform from someone strong, powerful, and almost invincible to someone completely and totally broken down.The novel ends in a deus ex machina fashion, and seems to have very little connection with what has preceded it. But nevertheless, this one is worth reading.more
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair is a book that I wish I'd read years ago. The lessons contained within are heartbreaking, unimaginable and essential. The writing was precise, descriptive and affecting. While I didn't exactly enjoy this incredibly depressing book, it was one of the most powerful books I've read.I know that many reviews complain about Sinclair's Socialist lean, as he does make it very apparent in the last 50 pages that he believes Socialism is the way to avoid the problems depicted in this book, namely the abuse of worker's by the bosses, poverty in general, the link between poverty and crime and the stigma against immigrants.To me, the protagonist's progression to Socialism made sense, was certainly backed up and was important to the overall text. I'm not sure how so many people seem to separate it from the text and say things like, “Oh, I loved it...except for that last Socialist bit in the end.” Perhaps they are the same sort of people who 'love' The Diary of Anne Frank. You know, except for that whole depressing holocaust part.more
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair is a book that I wish I'd read years ago. The lessons contained within are heartbreaking, unimaginable and essential. The writing was precise, descriptive and affecting. While I didn't exactly enjoy this incredibly depressing book, it was one of the most powerful books I've read.I know that many reviews complain about Sinclair's Socialist lean, as he does make it very apparent in the last 50 pages that he believes Socialism is the way to avoid the problems depicted in this book, namely the abuse of worker's by the bosses, poverty in general, the link between poverty and crime and the stigma against immigrants.To me, the protagonist's progression to Socialism made sense, was certainly backed up and was important to the overall text. I'm not sure how so many people seem to separate it from the text and say things like, “Oh, I loved it...except for that last Socialist bit in the end.” Perhaps they are the same sort of people who 'love' The Diary of Anne Frank. You know, except for that whole depressing holocaust part.more
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair is a book that I wish I'd read years ago. The lessons contained within are heartbreaking, unimaginable and essential. The writing was precise, descriptive and affecting. While I didn't exactly enjoy this incredibly depressing book, it was one of the most powerful books I've read.I know that many reviews complain about Sinclair's Socialist lean, as he does make it very apparent in the last 50 pages that he believes Socialism is the way to avoid the problems depicted in this book, namely the abuse of worker's by the bosses, poverty in general, the link between poverty and crime and the stigma against immigrants.To me, the protagonist's progression to Socialism made sense, was certainly backed up and was important to the overall text. I'm not sure how so many people seem to separate it from the text and say things like, “Oh, I loved it...except for that last Socialist bit in the end.” Perhaps they are the same sort of people who 'love' The Diary of Anne Frank. You know, except for that whole depressing holocaust part.more
The first three quarters of the book held my attention, and dragged me into the world of hard work, exhaustion, and hopelessness that the protagonist faced. The last quarter of the book seemed to drag on forever. I kept nodding off while reading, and was genuinely disappointed that the spirit of the book and the whole theme seemed to change just for the last few chapters. Although disappointed with the ending, the majority of the book was descriptive, thought-provoking and an overall good read.more
Read all 102 reviews

Reviews

I feel this would make an excellent play. The main character arrives in America and something akin to with arms like these how can I ever starve. Then slowly the tragedy sets in with misfortune after misfortune. The main character is subject to the pitfalls of a crooked city and his hope is dashed repeatedly by a cruel reality. He attempts to get work shovelling and his spirits are raised for an instant when the employer calls him to work. However, when his sleeves are rolled up they reveals weak and pale arms and he is sent away. It is after his body has been exploited and rendered useless that his mind opens to the preachings of socialism that the author wished to disseminate to the reader.more
I feel this would make an excellent play. The main character arrives in America and something akin to with arms like these how can I ever starve. Then slowly the tragedy sets in with misfortune after misfortune. The main character is subject to the pitfalls of a crooked city and his hope is dashed repeatedly by a cruel reality. He attempts to get work shovelling and his spirits are raised for an instant when the employer calls him to work. However, when his sleeves are rolled up they reveals weak and pale arms and he is sent away. It is after his body has been exploited and rendered useless that his mind opens to the preachings of socialism that the author wished to disseminate to the reader.more
The graphic novel adaptation took me about 10 minutes to read. But as other reviewers have noted the book is about the plight of immigrants. It just happened to be set in a meat packing plant. It makes one realize that undocumented immigrants today are only a little better of than those in The Jungle. Although today's meat packing plants are better we would still be disgusted by them. Don't get me started on factory farms.more
The graphic novel adaptation took me about 10 minutes to read. But as other reviewers have noted the book is about the plight of immigrants. It just happened to be set in a meat packing plant. It makes one realize that undocumented immigrants today are only a little better of than those in The Jungle. Although today's meat packing plants are better we would still be disgusted by them. Don't get me started on factory farms.more
The first 2/3 of the book was heart-wrenching. Sinclair is an incredible story-teller. The last third of the book however...yawn. At that point, I just wanted to scream "get on with it!"The last few chapters were just too muddled and preachy for my taste.more
The first 2/3 of the book was heart-wrenching. Sinclair is an incredible story-teller. The last third of the book however...yawn. At that point, I just wanted to scream "get on with it!"The last few chapters were just too muddled and preachy for my taste.more
The first 2/3 of the book was heart-wrenching. Sinclair is an incredible story-teller. The last third of the book however...yawn. At that point, I just wanted to scream "get on with it!"The last few chapters were just too muddled and preachy for my taste.more
I can just imagine the furore this book caused when it came out. The descriptions of the conditions at the meat packing plants in Chicago, which Sinclair knew from having gone undercover, were horrendous. As a result of this book the forerunner to the Food and Drugs Act was passed. At least as terrible as how meat was processed was how horribly the workers were treated. There was no such thing as health and safety or worker's compensation. If someone didn't turn up for work there were 100 more people to take their place. Wages were low and people went into debt to live in squalor. Children either worked in the meat packing plants or were sent out to sell papers. Women who had given birth had to go right back to work or lose their job. The protagonist lost everything, tried crime and strike breaking, and finally discovered socialism. Now, the promises and schemes the socialists made seem naive but to millions of the poor it must have seen like a beacon of light.more
I can just imagine the furore this book caused when it came out. The descriptions of the conditions at the meat packing plants in Chicago, which Sinclair knew from having gone undercover, were horrendous. As a result of this book the forerunner to the Food and Drugs Act was passed. At least as terrible as how meat was processed was how horribly the workers were treated. There was no such thing as health and safety or worker's compensation. If someone didn't turn up for work there were 100 more people to take their place. Wages were low and people went into debt to live in squalor. Children either worked in the meat packing plants or were sent out to sell papers. Women who had given birth had to go right back to work or lose their job. The protagonist lost everything, tried crime and strike breaking, and finally discovered socialism. Now, the promises and schemes the socialists made seem naive but to millions of the poor it must have seen like a beacon of light.more
I can just imagine the furore this book caused when it came out. The descriptions of the conditions at the meat packing plants in Chicago, which Sinclair knew from having gone undercover, were horrendous. As a result of this book the forerunner to the Food and Drugs Act was passed. At least as terrible as how meat was processed was how horribly the workers were treated. There was no such thing as health and safety or worker's compensation. If someone didn't turn up for work there were 100 more people to take their place. Wages were low and people went into debt to live in squalor. Children either worked in the meat packing plants or were sent out to sell papers. Women who had given birth had to go right back to work or lose their job. The protagonist lost everything, tried crime and strike breaking, and finally discovered socialism. Now, the promises and schemes the socialists made seem naive but to millions of the poor it must have seen like a beacon of light.more
Wow! They call it "muckraking journalism" (apparently), and the level of detail used by Sinclair to denounce malpractice in the meatpacking industry of early 20th century Chicago is truly staggering. The author himself claims that his real target was the exploitation and mistreatment of poor immigrants to the U.S. (the plot focuses on the plight of a family from Lithuania), but I can only believe that up to a point.It all makes for fascinating reading, and having visited Chicago, I simply had to use Google Maps to "rediscover" the streets mentioned in the text! Some readers (not myself) might be put off by the fact that Sinclair's in-depth exploration of a) meatpacking procedures and b) socialism actually take precedence over the plot itself.more
Well... this is definitely a book that arouses emotion and thought.When first starting The Jungle, I was impressed and moved by Upton Sinclair's writing. I felt like I'd been reading for forever and nothing had happened, but I still found it interesting because of the way it was written. But I'd talked to people who had read the book, so I knew tragedy couldn't be far away.Tragedy after tragedy strikes the characters until it seems like things just cannot get any worse. In fact, things get a little better, but then worse again. Better! Worse. Better! Worse. It gets tiring, to say the least.Upton Sinclair's writing never gets any less amazing, but I can take only so much tragedy and vehement heartbreak at a time. But, at least, I got to the end, and I felt a little...startled. It seems that Upton Sinclair wrote this entire tragedy just to convert readers to Socialism. And after reading the Afterward, I discovered that my impulse was correct: that was indeed Upton Sinclair's goal.I feel a little cheated, honestly. There's no denying that the fifty million speeches about Socialism at the end of The Jungle are inspiring and moved me to take a stand and do something to change my life, but then it just keeps going and you can tell Upton Sinclair is even more excited about Socialism than about all the tragedy of Chicago and the Rudkus family.The Jungle has definitely made me think, and it has definitely made me feel. But I can't say I agree with Upton Sinclair on all his political views, and I kind of wish he hadn't used his writing to sneak up on me and throw his ideas in my face.more
Well... this is definitely a book that arouses emotion and thought.When first starting The Jungle, I was impressed and moved by Upton Sinclair's writing. I felt like I'd been reading for forever and nothing had happened, but I still found it interesting because of the way it was written. But I'd talked to people who had read the book, so I knew tragedy couldn't be far away.Tragedy after tragedy strikes the characters until it seems like things just cannot get any worse. In fact, things get a little better, but then worse again. Better! Worse. Better! Worse. It gets tiring, to say the least.Upton Sinclair's writing never gets any less amazing, but I can take only so much tragedy and vehement heartbreak at a time. But, at least, I got to the end, and I felt a little...startled. It seems that Upton Sinclair wrote this entire tragedy just to convert readers to Socialism. And after reading the Afterward, I discovered that my impulse was correct: that was indeed Upton Sinclair's goal.I feel a little cheated, honestly. There's no denying that the fifty million speeches about Socialism at the end of The Jungle are inspiring and moved me to take a stand and do something to change my life, but then it just keeps going and you can tell Upton Sinclair is even more excited about Socialism than about all the tragedy of Chicago and the Rudkus family.The Jungle has definitely made me think, and it has definitely made me feel. But I can't say I agree with Upton Sinclair on all his political views, and I kind of wish he hadn't used his writing to sneak up on me and throw his ideas in my face.more
Well... this is definitely a book that arouses emotion and thought.When first starting The Jungle, I was impressed and moved by Upton Sinclair's writing. I felt like I'd been reading for forever and nothing had happened, but I still found it interesting because of the way it was written. But I'd talked to people who had read the book, so I knew tragedy couldn't be far away.Tragedy after tragedy strikes the characters until it seems like things just cannot get any worse. In fact, things get a little better, but then worse again. Better! Worse. Better! Worse. It gets tiring, to say the least.Upton Sinclair's writing never gets any less amazing, but I can take only so much tragedy and vehement heartbreak at a time. But, at least, I got to the end, and I felt a little...startled. It seems that Upton Sinclair wrote this entire tragedy just to convert readers to Socialism. And after reading the Afterward, I discovered that my impulse was correct: that was indeed Upton Sinclair's goal.I feel a little cheated, honestly. There's no denying that the fifty million speeches about Socialism at the end of The Jungle are inspiring and moved me to take a stand and do something to change my life, but then it just keeps going and you can tell Upton Sinclair is even more excited about Socialism than about all the tragedy of Chicago and the Rudkus family.The Jungle has definitely made me think, and it has definitely made me feel. But I can't say I agree with Upton Sinclair on all his political views, and I kind of wish he hadn't used his writing to sneak up on me and throw his ideas in my face.more
It was well written and has a hidden point, however it was the most boring and highly depressing book i have ever read. i'm glad that i read it, but i will not be reading it again or recommending it to others.more
It was well written and has a hidden point, however it was the most boring and highly depressing book i have ever read. i'm glad that i read it, but i will not be reading it again or recommending it to others.more
It was well written and has a hidden point, however it was the most boring and highly depressing book i have ever read. i'm glad that i read it, but i will not be reading it again or recommending it to others.more
I very much enjoyed this novel. Jurgus Rudkus is introduced as a large, strong, proud man. His struggles, tragedies, and downfalls show him transform from someone strong, powerful, and almost invincible to someone completely and totally broken down.The novel ends in a deus ex machina fashion, and seems to have very little connection with what has preceded it. But nevertheless, this one is worth reading.more
I very much enjoyed this novel. Jurgus Rudkus is introduced as a large, strong, proud man. His struggles, tragedies, and downfalls show him transform from someone strong, powerful, and almost invincible to someone completely and totally broken down.The novel ends in a deus ex machina fashion, and seems to have very little connection with what has preceded it. But nevertheless, this one is worth reading.more
I very much enjoyed this novel. Jurgus Rudkus is introduced as a large, strong, proud man. His struggles, tragedies, and downfalls show him transform from someone strong, powerful, and almost invincible to someone completely and totally broken down.The novel ends in a deus ex machina fashion, and seems to have very little connection with what has preceded it. But nevertheless, this one is worth reading.more
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair is a book that I wish I'd read years ago. The lessons contained within are heartbreaking, unimaginable and essential. The writing was precise, descriptive and affecting. While I didn't exactly enjoy this incredibly depressing book, it was one of the most powerful books I've read.I know that many reviews complain about Sinclair's Socialist lean, as he does make it very apparent in the last 50 pages that he believes Socialism is the way to avoid the problems depicted in this book, namely the abuse of worker's by the bosses, poverty in general, the link between poverty and crime and the stigma against immigrants.To me, the protagonist's progression to Socialism made sense, was certainly backed up and was important to the overall text. I'm not sure how so many people seem to separate it from the text and say things like, “Oh, I loved it...except for that last Socialist bit in the end.” Perhaps they are the same sort of people who 'love' The Diary of Anne Frank. You know, except for that whole depressing holocaust part.more
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair is a book that I wish I'd read years ago. The lessons contained within are heartbreaking, unimaginable and essential. The writing was precise, descriptive and affecting. While I didn't exactly enjoy this incredibly depressing book, it was one of the most powerful books I've read.I know that many reviews complain about Sinclair's Socialist lean, as he does make it very apparent in the last 50 pages that he believes Socialism is the way to avoid the problems depicted in this book, namely the abuse of worker's by the bosses, poverty in general, the link between poverty and crime and the stigma against immigrants.To me, the protagonist's progression to Socialism made sense, was certainly backed up and was important to the overall text. I'm not sure how so many people seem to separate it from the text and say things like, “Oh, I loved it...except for that last Socialist bit in the end.” Perhaps they are the same sort of people who 'love' The Diary of Anne Frank. You know, except for that whole depressing holocaust part.more
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair is a book that I wish I'd read years ago. The lessons contained within are heartbreaking, unimaginable and essential. The writing was precise, descriptive and affecting. While I didn't exactly enjoy this incredibly depressing book, it was one of the most powerful books I've read.I know that many reviews complain about Sinclair's Socialist lean, as he does make it very apparent in the last 50 pages that he believes Socialism is the way to avoid the problems depicted in this book, namely the abuse of worker's by the bosses, poverty in general, the link between poverty and crime and the stigma against immigrants.To me, the protagonist's progression to Socialism made sense, was certainly backed up and was important to the overall text. I'm not sure how so many people seem to separate it from the text and say things like, “Oh, I loved it...except for that last Socialist bit in the end.” Perhaps they are the same sort of people who 'love' The Diary of Anne Frank. You know, except for that whole depressing holocaust part.more
The first three quarters of the book held my attention, and dragged me into the world of hard work, exhaustion, and hopelessness that the protagonist faced. The last quarter of the book seemed to drag on forever. I kept nodding off while reading, and was genuinely disappointed that the spirit of the book and the whole theme seemed to change just for the last few chapters. Although disappointed with the ending, the majority of the book was descriptive, thought-provoking and an overall good read.more
Load more
scribd