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Enriched Classics offer readers accessible editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and commentary. Each book includes educational tools alongside the text, enabling students and readers alike to gain a deeper and more developed understanding of the writer and their work.

Upton Sinclair’s unflinching chronicle of crushing poverty and oppression set in Chicago in the early 1900s. A landmark work of social commentary, Sinclair’s work diligently exposes the inhumane and brutal sides of capitalism.

Enriched Classics enhance your engagement by introducing and explaining the historical and cultural significance of the work, the author’s personal history, and what impact this book had on subsequent scholarship. Each book includes discussion questions that help clarify and reinforce major themes and reading recommendations for further research.

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Published: Pocket Books on May 1, 2004
ISBN: 9781416503026
List price: $5.95
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This is a great book, published in 1906, especially from the historian's perspective. It was a book that after it was written, completely changed the Chicago stockyards. It was written about a Luthanian family who worked there during the beginning of the 20th century. Not many authors can be credited with writing a book that changed laws (The Pure Food and Drug Act (1906) is a direct result of the publication of this book). You have to appreciate a book that had such a monumental impact on many people's lives. The stockyards in Chicago were so bad... and this book brought it to light, not just in Chicago but nationally as well. Last year (2006) it was it's 100th year anniversary. It's a GREAT book and I highly recommend it.read more
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The Jungle tells the story of Jurgis Rudkus, a Lithuanian immigrant who has come to the United States with his extended family to find work. When he finds himself in Chicago, he and his family get work in the Chicago Stockyards. They immediately begin to struggle to make ends meet. Faced with unfair labor practices, unsafe working conditions, and questionable treatment from con men, Jurgis works harder and harder to support the family. But hard work is not enough to overcome the conditions that Jurgis and his family face.I found myself on the edge of my seat as I read this book. The descriptions of the conditions faced by Jurgis and his family were appalling. Each time I thought that they had finally caught a break, another tragedy befell the family. Sinclair provides insight into the meat packing industry, labor practices, Chicago politics and socialism as Jurgis searches for a way to overcome the system. The story was most effective when this historical background was woven with the story of Jurgis and his family. However, near the end of the book, Sinclair began to rely more on straight description, as Jurgis observed the workings of the Socialist party. Despite a rather abrupt ending, Sinclair's style was very effective in bringing to light the conditions of the times.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Jurgis and his family of Lithuanian immigrants struggle to stay afloat in the gritty urban reality of late 19th century Chicago. Jurgis witnesses first hand the horrors of the Chicago meat packing industry and ultimately gets pulled into the Socialist movement."The Jungle" is an effective teaching tool for helping students understand the political and social climate of America at the turn of the century. Not only is the book a good reference point historically, it also helps the reader make sense of abstract concepts such as "worker's rights", "labor unions," and "social movements."read more
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Reviews

This is a great book, published in 1906, especially from the historian's perspective. It was a book that after it was written, completely changed the Chicago stockyards. It was written about a Luthanian family who worked there during the beginning of the 20th century. Not many authors can be credited with writing a book that changed laws (The Pure Food and Drug Act (1906) is a direct result of the publication of this book). You have to appreciate a book that had such a monumental impact on many people's lives. The stockyards in Chicago were so bad... and this book brought it to light, not just in Chicago but nationally as well. Last year (2006) it was it's 100th year anniversary. It's a GREAT book and I highly recommend it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Jungle tells the story of Jurgis Rudkus, a Lithuanian immigrant who has come to the United States with his extended family to find work. When he finds himself in Chicago, he and his family get work in the Chicago Stockyards. They immediately begin to struggle to make ends meet. Faced with unfair labor practices, unsafe working conditions, and questionable treatment from con men, Jurgis works harder and harder to support the family. But hard work is not enough to overcome the conditions that Jurgis and his family face.I found myself on the edge of my seat as I read this book. The descriptions of the conditions faced by Jurgis and his family were appalling. Each time I thought that they had finally caught a break, another tragedy befell the family. Sinclair provides insight into the meat packing industry, labor practices, Chicago politics and socialism as Jurgis searches for a way to overcome the system. The story was most effective when this historical background was woven with the story of Jurgis and his family. However, near the end of the book, Sinclair began to rely more on straight description, as Jurgis observed the workings of the Socialist party. Despite a rather abrupt ending, Sinclair's style was very effective in bringing to light the conditions of the times.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Jurgis and his family of Lithuanian immigrants struggle to stay afloat in the gritty urban reality of late 19th century Chicago. Jurgis witnesses first hand the horrors of the Chicago meat packing industry and ultimately gets pulled into the Socialist movement."The Jungle" is an effective teaching tool for helping students understand the political and social climate of America at the turn of the century. Not only is the book a good reference point historically, it also helps the reader make sense of abstract concepts such as "worker's rights", "labor unions," and "social movements."
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a book that I love. I read it when I was living in the woods of Wisconsin after being abused on a job by a miserly old small town employer bully.The story is described in the introduction of the copy with this cover as being rather thin and superfluous to its intent to expose the plight of the workers as a group. The characters are meant to be composites and are merely used to illustrate social conditions. This kind of analysis deadens the emotional impact of the struggling protagonist and his families plight.It is always noted that this book spawned reforms in the meatpacking industry not over the cost of human suffering but just the unwholesome product that was exposed in the revolting manner in which the food was being produced.
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Sinclair tries to enlist our sympathy and support for the socialist cause. But mostly what we bring away from this book is the horrifying conditions in the meatpacking industry, and the heart-rending plight of the immigrant worker. As he once said, he aimed for our hearts and got our stomachs instead.
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I was assigned this book for a history class, got about a third or perhaps half through it before realizing that, if I were to go any further, I would run the risk of wanting leap off a cliff. This is, hands down, the most deliberately and coldly depressing novel I have ever come across. I would strongly suggest the Spark Notes on this one, or simply taking a bad grade if you are assigned it. Yes, it's that bad.
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