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Enriched Classics offer readers accessible editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and commentary. Each book includes educational tools alongside the text, enabling students and readers alike to gain a deeper and more developed understanding of the writer and their work.

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.

The first sentence of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice is among the most quoted in literature, and sets up the humorous and ultimately timeless tale of proper English society, unspoken intentions, and true love acquired. Pride and Prejudice is a classic that adeptly traces the intricacies of social status, manners, and relationship rituals in nineteenth-century England, through which all the love between Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy eventually blossoms.

Enriched Classics enhance your engagement by introducing and explaining the historical and cultural significance of the work, the author’s personal history, and what impact this book had on subsequent scholarship. Each book includes discussion questions that help clarify and reinforce major themes and reading recommendations for further research.

Read with confidence.

Topics: England, Regency Era, Romantic, Witty, Domestic, Love, Marriage, Family, Made into a Movie, Love Story, Feminism, Social Class, Comedy of Manners, Female Protagonist, Third Person Narration, 19th Century, Female Author, and British Author

Published: Pocket Books on
ISBN: 9781416503040
List price: $4.95
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Jane Austen once wrote that Anne Elliott, the heroine of her final novel, Persuasion, was "too good for me," and I cannot help but echo her sentiments. A woman of great good sense, utterly lacking in snobbery or pretension (despite her father's "elevated" status as a baronet), Anne seems to possess an almost flawless self-control, that, when paired with her self-sacrificing attention to the needs of others, and patient endurance of the many slights she receives at the hands of her unworthy family, makes me want to shake her...Her one flaw, which arises from her virtues, and which forms the crux of this astute examination of love lost and then found again, is that she is too easily persuaded. Having been convinced some years before to sacrifice her attachment to the man she loved, Anne finds herself confronted - at the ripe old age of twenty-seven! - with her spurned love, and with the consequences of her choice.I enjoyed Persuasion immensely, and was not at all surprised to discover that it was Austen's final novel, written as she was slipping into the illness which would cause her death. Not as bright as some of her other work, it still has that pointed Austen wit, which, when combined with more mature themes, makes for a deeply satisfying read.more
Great girl meets boy read. I recommend to anyone over my age (12)! It's brilliant and I think it truly shows how amazing Jane Austen really is!more
Austen is funniest when she’s dealing with social snobs, and this novel starts out that way. But the heroine is the daughter of the snob in question, and she is a modest and sensible young lady. Her main fault is that she’s been too easily persuaded to turn her back on the man she really loves. This novel brings her back to him. It’s a perfect antidote after you've read anything depressing.more
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Reviews

always wanted to read more
Jane Austen once wrote that Anne Elliott, the heroine of her final novel, Persuasion, was "too good for me," and I cannot help but echo her sentiments. A woman of great good sense, utterly lacking in snobbery or pretension (despite her father's "elevated" status as a baronet), Anne seems to possess an almost flawless self-control, that, when paired with her self-sacrificing attention to the needs of others, and patient endurance of the many slights she receives at the hands of her unworthy family, makes me want to shake her...Her one flaw, which arises from her virtues, and which forms the crux of this astute examination of love lost and then found again, is that she is too easily persuaded. Having been convinced some years before to sacrifice her attachment to the man she loved, Anne finds herself confronted - at the ripe old age of twenty-seven! - with her spurned love, and with the consequences of her choice.I enjoyed Persuasion immensely, and was not at all surprised to discover that it was Austen's final novel, written as she was slipping into the illness which would cause her death. Not as bright as some of her other work, it still has that pointed Austen wit, which, when combined with more mature themes, makes for a deeply satisfying read.more
Great girl meets boy read. I recommend to anyone over my age (12)! It's brilliant and I think it truly shows how amazing Jane Austen really is!more
Austen is funniest when she’s dealing with social snobs, and this novel starts out that way. But the heroine is the daughter of the snob in question, and she is a modest and sensible young lady. Her main fault is that she’s been too easily persuaded to turn her back on the man she really loves. This novel brings her back to him. It’s a perfect antidote after you've read anything depressing.more
Jane Austen wasn't taught at my high school and I didn't take any English lit classes in college. I was in my mid twenties and the Jane Austen phenomena was gaining momentum. Since then I've been trying and failing to read any Austen book start to finish. That is until this year when I discovered the perfect way to read her books: audio in the car.Pride and Prejudice is now the best known and most popular of Austen's books. When I was a teen, it was Sense and Sensibility (thanks to Clueless). P&P's current popularity is due in large part to the film adaptation Collin Firth was in.The Bennett family is in a bit of a pickle. Mr. Bennett's financial affairs (and the house) are in the red. If he dies, the house goes to his creditor and Mrs. Bennett and their five daughters are out on the street. The only thing to do — marry off the daughters.Jane is the oldest and most beautiful. Tradition states she should be married first to pave the way for her sisters. But there's a snag in the form of Mr. Darcy who makes an ass of himself at the first dance and thoroughly pisses of the second daughter, Elizabeth. She pegs him for being prideful but is blind to her own prejudice.Like a modern day soap opera, the novel contrives to put Darcy and Elizabeth together in as many frustrating and embarrassing ways as possible. Eventually though the reasons behind Darcy's behavior comes out and Elizabeth softens.Listening to the audio gave me a better appreciation for the novel. I can see why it's popular. I had a few problems with the production of the audio. The woman reading the book gave Mrs. Bennett a harpy voice. It literally set my teeth on edge.more
Reading Jane Austen is like drinking a perfectly made cup of tea, late in the afternoon. Her prose is so smooth and comforting and perfectly elegant. I really enjoyed Persuasion, more than I expected to. Austen seemed to really explore the motivations and interactions of her characters. The breathless and romantic ending was delightfully swoony as well. :)more
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