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Wolves of the Calla is the highly anticipated fifth book in Stephen King’s Dark Tower series—a unique bestselling epic fantasy quest inspired many years ago by The Lord of the Rings.

Set in a world of extraordinary circumstances, filled with stunning visual imagery and unforgettable characters, the Dark Tower series is unlike anything you have ever read. Here is the fifth installment.

Topics: Alternate Universe, Supernatural Powers, Parallel Dimensions, Vampires, Wolves, Magic, Journeys, Suspenseful, Adventurous, Dark, Fantastical, American West, Series, Epic, and Speculative Fiction

Published: Scribner on Nov 4, 2003
ISBN: 9780743255103
List price: $9.99
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I'm not going to rate these separately as that doesn't make sense to me. I thought this was a wonderful series. I was horrified when he got hit by the car and I thought he may not be able to finish the story. The plot was incredible and the characters were like close friends of mine by the end. His imagery and imagination are an inspiration to those of us who strive to write for a living. His best work by far, IMHO.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The final three books of the Dark Tower series read more like one book, as the Dark Tower itself looms close. [Wolves of the Calla] finds the ka-tet of Roland, Eddie, Susannah, Jake, and Oy in Calla Bryn Sturgis, a sleepy agricultural village beset by marauders who steal their children. The villagers entreat the gunslingers for help and the band stands against the forces of the Red King. More than any of the other books in the series, [Wolves of the Calla] bridges the worlds of King’s other books, detailing the exploits of Father Callahan, from King’s earlier story about vampires, [Salem’s Lot]. In the final afterword of the final book of the series, King makes clear that he has known, unconsciously at least, that many of his stories refer back to Roland’s world. And catching up with the priest here, after all these years, is a treat. As the story races toward its conclusion, King will bridge several other stories, their seeds neatly planted in this installment. In fact, if you open up to the list of books by King, the ones that cross over into Roland’s world are in bold, and the total is close to half.[Wolves of the Calla] is one of the favorite books of the installment in the series for most readers because the ka-tet finally gets to fight as one, and they are true in their stand. For me, it ranks after [Drawing of the Three], [The Gunslinger], and [Wizard and Glass]. But the reason it ranks so low for me, is that it feels unfinished on its own. The story never really breaks from this point forward, until Roland stands atop the Tower, peering through another door.5 bonesread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This series has me firmly in its grasp. This is one of the most complete-feeling novels in the series, I think, even though you really need to have read the books before it to understand what's going on. I think the fact that the ka-tet isn't travelling for the entire novel gives it a less picaresque feel. The only thing I was kind of disappointed with was the illustrations in this one -- I preferred the style of the pictures in The Drawing of the Three and Song of Susannah to the more pulpy feel here. I don't disagree that in some ways The Dark Tower is a very pulpy series, but I found the illustrations distracting and caught myself thinking things like, "Why does Eddie have long shaggy hair, but Jake and Roland have neatly trimmed hair?" "Why is Susannah naked? I don't remember her being naked in this bit..." You get the idea.read more
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I'm not going to rate these separately as that doesn't make sense to me. I thought this was a wonderful series. I was horrified when he got hit by the car and I thought he may not be able to finish the story. The plot was incredible and the characters were like close friends of mine by the end. His imagery and imagination are an inspiration to those of us who strive to write for a living. His best work by far, IMHO.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The final three books of the Dark Tower series read more like one book, as the Dark Tower itself looms close. [Wolves of the Calla] finds the ka-tet of Roland, Eddie, Susannah, Jake, and Oy in Calla Bryn Sturgis, a sleepy agricultural village beset by marauders who steal their children. The villagers entreat the gunslingers for help and the band stands against the forces of the Red King. More than any of the other books in the series, [Wolves of the Calla] bridges the worlds of King’s other books, detailing the exploits of Father Callahan, from King’s earlier story about vampires, [Salem’s Lot]. In the final afterword of the final book of the series, King makes clear that he has known, unconsciously at least, that many of his stories refer back to Roland’s world. And catching up with the priest here, after all these years, is a treat. As the story races toward its conclusion, King will bridge several other stories, their seeds neatly planted in this installment. In fact, if you open up to the list of books by King, the ones that cross over into Roland’s world are in bold, and the total is close to half.[Wolves of the Calla] is one of the favorite books of the installment in the series for most readers because the ka-tet finally gets to fight as one, and they are true in their stand. For me, it ranks after [Drawing of the Three], [The Gunslinger], and [Wizard and Glass]. But the reason it ranks so low for me, is that it feels unfinished on its own. The story never really breaks from this point forward, until Roland stands atop the Tower, peering through another door.5 bones
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This series has me firmly in its grasp. This is one of the most complete-feeling novels in the series, I think, even though you really need to have read the books before it to understand what's going on. I think the fact that the ka-tet isn't travelling for the entire novel gives it a less picaresque feel. The only thing I was kind of disappointed with was the illustrations in this one -- I preferred the style of the pictures in The Drawing of the Three and Song of Susannah to the more pulpy feel here. I don't disagree that in some ways The Dark Tower is a very pulpy series, but I found the illustrations distracting and caught myself thinking things like, "Why does Eddie have long shaggy hair, but Jake and Roland have neatly trimmed hair?" "Why is Susannah naked? I don't remember her being naked in this bit..." You get the idea.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm having a problem with this series of books in that they feel like they're leaving way too much left to say and there isn't enough room left to say it in. It's hard to review any one book in particular in the Dark Tower series beyond the first two because every book after The Drawing of the Three feels like one book interrupted by circumstance and time. I couldn't imagine what it was like to read The Wastelands and have to wait for the end to the cliffhanger, and I can't believe King waited until Wizard in the Glass to tell the back-story on Roland, only to leave it half finished.One of the draws for reading the series to begin with was the allure of tying a bunch of King novels together through these books, and at the end of the day it does, though to what lengths I'm not sure are worth it. In this volume we get re introduced to Father Callahan from Salem's Lot who has found his way into the ever-changing world of Roland Deschain. At first I was floored by this and couldn't wait to get some further info on the Salem's Lot world, but at the end of the day all we get is a lot more info on a small character that really doesn't reflect much on the SL book. This really isn't all that much of a bad thing except that I'm not so sure this aside in the Dark Tower series does much to help the plot to the Tower. As far as the book on it's own outside of the tower series is concerned, I think this is the one recent volume that stands pretty well on it's own where the story has a pretty good beginning, middle and end, much like the Drawing of the Three and doesn't feel as rushed at either The Wastelands or Song of Susannah. I think that the characters all get just enough to do and all get to change enough to keep them dynamic and fun to read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Dark Tower series was nothing I would have expected from Stephen King. I have read many of his books and never have they had such a long running graphically intense story. This series is really good and keeps you reading till the very end; the end on the other hand left the story on a less desirable note. Overall I would recommend this book to many individuals and not just the fans of Stephen King! I would like to see more along this type of writing from Stephen King!
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It was nice to get the story going again after the weak Book 4. There was a lot of back-story here involving a character that I wasn't expecting to see: Father Callahan from Salem's Lot. On the whole, it was a pretty good book. If you were looking for action with big gunslinger scenes--well, you have a long time to wait until anything happens there. The whole Stephen King universe is getting sucked into the Dark Tower books--I hope that this doesn't get too crazy. I have to hand it to Stephen King--he knows how to write to make you want to come back with an ending that makes you run out and get book 6.
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