• book

From the Publisher

Keep forgetting where you put your keys? Wish you could get through the crossword faster? Experiencing too many "intellectual pauses"? Then this is the book for you.

Brain Candy is an authoritative, comprehensive, and above all, cutting-edge look at what you can take to rev up your brain—enhance memory, think faster, sharpen creativity, focus better. The only authors yet to tackle this subject who are experts in both brain function and drug action, Theodore Lidsky and Jay Schneider explain in plain English what the effects of these substances are on the body. For aging baby boomers—and for anyone else who wants a quicker wit—Brain Candy has all the answers.

Topics: Drugs, Mindfulness, Informative, and Guides

Published: Touchstone on
ISBN: 9780743218436
List price: $6.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Brain Candy by Theodore Lidsky and Jay Schneider
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Nautilus
4 min read
Science

What Sea Slugs Taught Us About Our Brain: The simple nerve cells of sea creatures helped scientists fathom human memory.

When Leonid Moroz, a gregarious Russian-born neuroscientist and geneticist at the University of Florida, began studying ctenophores nearly a decade ago, he had a fairly simple goal in mind. He wanted to determine exactly where the blobby marine creatures—which are more commonly known as comb jellies because of the comb-like projections they use to swim—belonged on the tree of life. After spending several years sequencing ctenophores, Moroz and his team discovered that the animals were missing many of the genes found in the nervous system of other animals thought to be closely related, such as
Entrepreneur
2 min read
Psychology

Finding the Right Hire for Your Company

Q: How do you make sure new hires will mesh well with your other employees and with your company's culture? A: Gregg S. Lipman's hiring motto has always been: "Prima donnas need not apply." That should tell you all you need to know about the spirit of collaboration at CBX, the New York City-based brand agency where Lipman is managing partner. Like all good entrepreneurs, Lipman has learned from his mistakes. He once tried to hire what he calls "disrupters and agitators"--folks whose personalities, work habits and sundry intangible qualities would clash with the existing work force. He figured
New York Magazine
1 min read
Science

Bumbling is Good for the Brain

JIHAN THOMPSON NEURONAL CONNECTIONS ARE created in the brain when you attempt something new. Plenty of research indicates this, including a 2010 study in The Journal of Neuroscience that found that even after just two sessions of practicing a new task, the brain creates more gray matter. A 2015-published study by an MIT team that examined neuromuscular junctions in fruit flies suggested that, effectively, the simple act of forcing yourself to get your head around something novel can produce new connections between neurons or strengthen existing ones. That goes for trying stuff you’re bad at,