Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
The stunning, classic coming-of-age novel written by one of America's foremost Southern writers

A legendary author on par with William Faulkner and Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Wolfe published Look Homeward, Angel, his first novel, about a young man's burning desire to leave his small town and tumultuous family in search of a better life, in 1929. It gave the world proof of his genius and launched a powerful legacy.

The novel follows the trajectory of Eugene Gant, a brilliant and restless young man whose wanderlust and passion shape his adolescent years in rural North Carolina. Wolfe said that Look Homeward, Angel is "a book made out of my life," and his largely autobiographical story about the quest for a greater intellectual life has resonated with and influenced generations of readers, including some of today's most important novelists. Rich with lyrical prose and vivid characterizations, this twentieth-century American classic will capture the hearts and imaginations of every reader.
Published: Scribner on Jul 1, 1997
ISBN: 9781416542438
List price: $14.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Look Homeward, Angel
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

astounding read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a nearly impossible book to review. It is at once a classic, an experimental masterpiece, a resounding mess, and a beautiful failure. When I talk about which books inspired me to become a writer I often cite LET US NOW PRAISE FAMOUS MEN by James Agee. LOOK HOMEWARD ANGEL would, I suspect, have had the same sort of effect on me had I read it when I was a teenager, which is the age at which I read FAMOUS MEN. At such an age, and with the wild, passionate temperament of youth, I thrilled to the elevated (faintly purple) prose, the long passages of meandering, if somewhat superfluous beauty, the self-consciousness, the insistence by the author to include EVERYTHING. But re-reading FAMOUS MEN, and now reading ANGEL as a middle-aged woman I am impatient with the self-indulgence, which in Agee I put down to too much whiskey, but for which I have no such excuse in Wolfe. I find myself skipping passages, which is never a good sign. There is no denying Wolfe's stunning capacity for character depth. The question is, does the story require quite this much depth? If passages were trimmed, if details were pared down to only the very best, would anything have been lost? I suspect not. Faulkner and Kerouac both cited Wolfe as an influence, and I can see that -- the high poetics, the stream-of-consciousness, the young man's unbridled, undisciplined approach to art is obvious. And there is certainly a value in that. I just wish Wolfe had made more choices, instead of flinging everything at the page and then keeping everything. There's something to be said for Oscar Wilde, who "spent the morning putting in a comma, and spent the afternoon taking it out again."I would definitely recommend ANGEL to my fourteen-year-old self. It would have, I think, enhanced my writer's education, and I will recommend it to anyone under the age of 25 who either wants to be a writer or who loves literature. But for those of us who have lived a while, and who have less patience for pyrotechnics, ANGEL is a bit of a slog, albeit a mightily poetic one.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Wolfe's first and greatest novel. A heartfelt and well done telling of his unusually intense youth in the mountains of North Carolina. Great American prose writing.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

astounding
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a nearly impossible book to review. It is at once a classic, an experimental masterpiece, a resounding mess, and a beautiful failure. When I talk about which books inspired me to become a writer I often cite LET US NOW PRAISE FAMOUS MEN by James Agee. LOOK HOMEWARD ANGEL would, I suspect, have had the same sort of effect on me had I read it when I was a teenager, which is the age at which I read FAMOUS MEN. At such an age, and with the wild, passionate temperament of youth, I thrilled to the elevated (faintly purple) prose, the long passages of meandering, if somewhat superfluous beauty, the self-consciousness, the insistence by the author to include EVERYTHING. But re-reading FAMOUS MEN, and now reading ANGEL as a middle-aged woman I am impatient with the self-indulgence, which in Agee I put down to too much whiskey, but for which I have no such excuse in Wolfe. I find myself skipping passages, which is never a good sign. There is no denying Wolfe's stunning capacity for character depth. The question is, does the story require quite this much depth? If passages were trimmed, if details were pared down to only the very best, would anything have been lost? I suspect not. Faulkner and Kerouac both cited Wolfe as an influence, and I can see that -- the high poetics, the stream-of-consciousness, the young man's unbridled, undisciplined approach to art is obvious. And there is certainly a value in that. I just wish Wolfe had made more choices, instead of flinging everything at the page and then keeping everything. There's something to be said for Oscar Wilde, who "spent the morning putting in a comma, and spent the afternoon taking it out again."I would definitely recommend ANGEL to my fourteen-year-old self. It would have, I think, enhanced my writer's education, and I will recommend it to anyone under the age of 25 who either wants to be a writer or who loves literature. But for those of us who have lived a while, and who have less patience for pyrotechnics, ANGEL is a bit of a slog, albeit a mightily poetic one.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Wolfe's first and greatest novel. A heartfelt and well done telling of his unusually intense youth in the mountains of North Carolina. Great American prose writing.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Everyone has a big fat book in their life. This is mine.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
In my 20s, this book had a big impact on me. Eugene's restless yearning to move on, to get out and see the rest of the world became my own story. I visited Asheville several times to see the boarding house and his grave. There were lots of young people at the Wolfe Historic Site, just like me -- wandering around trying to make a connection with Wolfe's rapsodic prose.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I am usually in favor of more stark prose, but this ornate story captured my imagination. The actual plot dragged quite a bit...the protaganist, Eugene Gant, isn't even born until quite a ways into the book. But each little section of the book can almost be taken as a story in itself.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Load more
scribd