Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATED BY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIP

A collection of quintessentially American poems, the seminal work of one of the most influential writers of the nineteenth century.

THIS ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES:


A concise introduction that gives readers important background information A chronology of the author's life and work A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations Detailed explanatory notes Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience

Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world s finest books to their full potential.

SERIES EDITED BY CYNTHIA BRANTLEY JOHNSON
Published: Simon & Schuster on Aug 1, 2006
ISBN: 9781416540168
List price: $5.95
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Leaves of Grass
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

The book that started it all. I would never have gone back to college if I hadn't read this--carried it with me everywhere for months! Walt Whitman is my "great uncle."read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A lot of the poems didn't speak to me. Particularly the war and patriotism ones. But in amongst those are some absolute gems on the topic of love and looks, work and life. And compost! How can I not approve of a man who writes a poem about compost?read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read this book as a requirement for an Major American Writers class and found it to incredible. I rarely like the books that are assigned in class, but this one is one of the few exceptions.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

The book that started it all. I would never have gone back to college if I hadn't read this--carried it with me everywhere for months! Walt Whitman is my "great uncle."
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A lot of the poems didn't speak to me. Particularly the war and patriotism ones. But in amongst those are some absolute gems on the topic of love and looks, work and life. And compost! How can I not approve of a man who writes a poem about compost?
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read this book as a requirement for an Major American Writers class and found it to incredible. I rarely like the books that are assigned in class, but this one is one of the few exceptions.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
My favorite Whitman piece is "To You, Whoever You Are". This poem is not included in the 1855 edition of Leaves Of Grass. This is the only reason I am not giving it 5 stars. And it's no fault of Walt's. Not even my own, I just felt I needed to own this edition. Surely I will procure the deathbed edition in due time and while some more hours away in the sunshine reading his genius.I love Walt Whitman, period.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
"The American bards shall be marked for generosity and affection...by the absence in them of tricks and by the justification of perfect personal candor." That pretty much sums up Whitman for me.

Except I might add 'urgent' to the list of Whitman-esque adjectives. Sometimes the man got so carried away that he sprayed a poem with exclamation points. But I think he can be forgiven in the case of his moving lament for President Lincoln:

"O CAPTAIN! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;
The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won;
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring:
But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up--for you the flag is flung--for you the bugle trills; 10
For you bouquets and ribbon'd wreaths--for you the shores a-crowding;
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;
Here Captain! dear father!
This arm beneath your head;
It is some dream that on the deck,
You've fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;
The ship is anchor'd safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;
From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won; 20
Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!
But I, with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead."
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
While I appreciate the beautiful language used by Walt Whitman and free verse poetry in general, I am not really a fan. I much prefer the rhyming verse of Tennyson, Longfellow, Browning, etc. In fact, the one poem by Whitman that I really enjoy is O Captain! My Captain!, with conventional meter and rhyme. I am glad that I read this book and familiarized myself with Whitman's style, but it's not really for me.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Load more
scribd