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ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATED BY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIP

A collection of quintessentially American poems, the seminal work of one of the most influential writers of the nineteenth century.

THIS ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES:


A concise introduction that gives readers important background information A chronology of the author's life and work A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations Detailed explanatory notes Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience

Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world s finest books to their full potential.

SERIES EDITED BY CYNTHIA BRANTLEY JOHNSON
Published: Simon & Schuster on
ISBN: 9781416540168
List price: $5.95
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This delightful Illustrated Leaves of Grass, with introduction by William Carlos Williams (also a poet) and edited by Howard Chapnick, provides clarity and adds dimension to 14 complete poems and 6 excerpts of his longer works. The photos, lay side-by-side with the text, made Whitman’s words pop and dance. His message is so clear, strong, and timeless when presented in this format. Considering Leaves of Grass was written between 1855 to 1892 and these photos are from 1960 to 1970, it certainly has withstood the test of time. I can even visualize what a version with current events may look.In the introduction by Williams, he wrote, “Whitman came from a rhetorical and long-winded age.” I laughed and didn’t feel so bad that I had said Whitman word-puked in my recent Leaves of Grass review. He also wrote, “Never to my knowledge had the subjects of Whitman’s Leaves of Grass been so presented! The poem came alive for me as if for the first time.” Well said. I uploaded a few pictures in my gallery to share.More Quotes:On Equality from “Song of Myself”:“I am the poet of the womanthe same as the man;And I say it is as great to be a woman as to be a man;And I say there is nothinggreater than the motherof men.”On Celebration of the Body and the Relationship between Men and Women, from “I Sing the Body Electric”:“I sing the Body electric;The armies of those I love engirth me,and I engirth them;They will not let me off till I go with them,respond to them,And discorrupt them, and charge them fullwith the charge of the Soul.Was it doubted that those who corrupt their own bodies conceal themselves?And if those who defile the livingare as bad as they who defile the dead?And if the body does not do as muchas the Soul?And if the body were not the Soul,what is the Soul?The love of the Body of man or womanbalks account – the body itself balks account;That of the male is perfect, and thatof the female is perfect.”On Aging, from “To Old Age”:“I see in you the estuary thatenlarges and spreads itself grandlyas it pours in the great Sea.” ----- I love this lineOn Adventure and the Journey of Life, from “Song of the Open Road”: “Afoot and light-hearted, I take to the open road,Healthy, free, the world before me,The long brown path before me, leading wherever I choose.Henceforth I whimper no more, postpone no more, need nothingHenceforth I ask not good-fortune – I myself am good-fortune;Strong and content, I travel the open road.”And“Now I re-examine philosophies and religions,They may prove well in lecture-rooms, yet not prove at all under the spaciousclouds, and along the landscape and flowing currents.”And“Mon enfant! I give you my hand!I give you my love, more precious than money,I give you myself, before preaching or law;Will you give me yourself? will you come travel with me?Shall we stick by each other as long as we live?”On President Lincoln’s Assassination – one of his most moving pieces:"O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won;The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring:But O heart! heart! heart! O the bleeding drops of red, Where on the deck my Captain lies, Fallen cold and dead.O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;Rise up--for you the flag is flung--for you the bugle trills; 10For you bouquets and ribbon'd wreaths--for you the shores a-crowding;For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;Here Captain! dear father! This arm beneath your head; It is some dream that on the deck, You've fallen cold and dead.My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;The ship is anchor'd safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won; 20Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells! But I, with mournful tread, Walk the deck my Captain lies, Fallen cold and dead."On Whitman’s Acceptance of Death:“I bequeath myself to the dirt to grow from the grass I love,If you want me again look for me under your boot soles.You will hardly know who I am or what I am,But I shall be good health to you nevertheless,And filter and fibre your blood.Failing to fetch me at first keep encouraged,Missing me one place search another,I stop somewhere waiting for you.”more
A lot of the poems didn't speak to me. Particularly the war and patriotism ones. But in amongst those are some absolute gems on the topic of love and looks, work and life. And compost! How can I not approve of a man who writes a poem about compost?more
Read this book as a requirement for an Major American Writers class and found it to incredible. I rarely like the books that are assigned in class, but this one is one of the few exceptions.more
Song of Myself

1
I celebrate myself, and sing myself,
And what I assume you shall assume,
For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.
I loafe and invite my soul,
I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass.
My tongue, every atom of my blood, form'd from this soil, this air,
Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same,
I, now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin,
Hoping to cease not till death.
Creeds and schools in abeyance,
Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,
I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,
Nature without check with original energy.

more
It is easy, and periodically fashionable to take Whitman for granted. Yes he is shamelessly self-involved and often goofy. He is also -- and here's the point, brothers and sisters -- continually amazing, and very good company. As with Bruckner Symphonies and the poems of Homer, there will always be the vexing question of which text is best. This particular edition is that, but its occasional inadequacies are more than covered by the wonderful illustrations by Lewis C. Daniel, an artist who dserved better than the obscurity into whic he has fallen.more
While I appreciate the beautiful language used by Walt Whitman and free verse poetry in general, I am not really a fan. I much prefer the rhyming verse of Tennyson, Longfellow, Browning, etc. In fact, the one poem by Whitman that I really enjoy is O Captain! My Captain!, with conventional meter and rhyme. I am glad that I read this book and familiarized myself with Whitman's style, but it's not really for me.more
Honestly my favorite collection of poems. The open road is my favorite. Walt Whitman discusses the connectedness of nature, democracy, and subtler, prettier things.more
Walt Whitman is a genius of a poet. He takes what seems like existential ramblings, and turns them into beautiful and self-reflective pieces of art. This is not just poetry, it’s literally a thesis on life, a philosophical treasure, a song that celebrates being alive, a picture depicting the cycles of life, an ode to the SOUL – simple thoughts, taken to extraordinary levels by an extraordinary man.Although to some, the poems may be too open-ended, long, tedious or verbose to appear enjoyable - but, when you lay bare the meaning behind Whitman's words, you cannot help but feel empowered, aware, introspective, a believer in life, the lover of a human body, and a worshiper of the human soul. What more can you ask from a poet, and his poetry? Read it, live it, and love it!more
The book that started it all. I would never have gone back to college if I hadn't read this--carried it with me everywhere for months! Walt Whitman is my "great uncle."more
If there was a single book I could have on a deserted island it would be "Leaves of Grass". It is beautiful, inspired writing. It's been analyzed by many so I'll spare you any grand statements or a lot of detail, but for a taste of the themes Whitman puts across:- All men are brothers. The book celebrates the common man, and embraces the man that society has cast out or looked down upon.- Delight and oneness with nature. Delight in the small things in nature.- Spirituality achieved not by subjugating the senses or pleasures but by embracing them, and living life to the fullest.- The belief in the innate power, spirituality, and goodness of man. All of this is done in a very natural, unpretentious way ... I believe Whitman was truly inspired when he initially wrote this book, and was not regurgitating someone else's philosophy or metaphysics. There are so many wonderful passages and quotes, maybe someday I'll include some here but for now I'll just say I highly, highly recommend this book. Read it outside, under a tree.more
My favorite Whitman piece is "To You, Whoever You Are". This poem is not included in the 1855 edition of Leaves Of Grass. This is the only reason I am not giving it 5 stars. And it's no fault of Walt's. Not even my own, I just felt I needed to own this edition. Surely I will procure the deathbed edition in due time and while some more hours away in the sunshine reading his genius.I love Walt Whitman, period.more
a literary find. read with different understanding each decade of my life so far. still have my original copy - a gift at age 16 of a 1921 edition... can't even see the title on the cover anymore. all my reading has been measured against this volume. everyone should read it - at least once.more
For some reason, Walt Whitman and Brahms are tied up in my mind as the same person...kinda like God and Santa Claus were when I was a kid. Regardless, Whitman (like Brahms) is obviously a genius!more
Read all 16 reviews

Reviews

This delightful Illustrated Leaves of Grass, with introduction by William Carlos Williams (also a poet) and edited by Howard Chapnick, provides clarity and adds dimension to 14 complete poems and 6 excerpts of his longer works. The photos, lay side-by-side with the text, made Whitman’s words pop and dance. His message is so clear, strong, and timeless when presented in this format. Considering Leaves of Grass was written between 1855 to 1892 and these photos are from 1960 to 1970, it certainly has withstood the test of time. I can even visualize what a version with current events may look.In the introduction by Williams, he wrote, “Whitman came from a rhetorical and long-winded age.” I laughed and didn’t feel so bad that I had said Whitman word-puked in my recent Leaves of Grass review. He also wrote, “Never to my knowledge had the subjects of Whitman’s Leaves of Grass been so presented! The poem came alive for me as if for the first time.” Well said. I uploaded a few pictures in my gallery to share.More Quotes:On Equality from “Song of Myself”:“I am the poet of the womanthe same as the man;And I say it is as great to be a woman as to be a man;And I say there is nothinggreater than the motherof men.”On Celebration of the Body and the Relationship between Men and Women, from “I Sing the Body Electric”:“I sing the Body electric;The armies of those I love engirth me,and I engirth them;They will not let me off till I go with them,respond to them,And discorrupt them, and charge them fullwith the charge of the Soul.Was it doubted that those who corrupt their own bodies conceal themselves?And if those who defile the livingare as bad as they who defile the dead?And if the body does not do as muchas the Soul?And if the body were not the Soul,what is the Soul?The love of the Body of man or womanbalks account – the body itself balks account;That of the male is perfect, and thatof the female is perfect.”On Aging, from “To Old Age”:“I see in you the estuary thatenlarges and spreads itself grandlyas it pours in the great Sea.” ----- I love this lineOn Adventure and the Journey of Life, from “Song of the Open Road”: “Afoot and light-hearted, I take to the open road,Healthy, free, the world before me,The long brown path before me, leading wherever I choose.Henceforth I whimper no more, postpone no more, need nothingHenceforth I ask not good-fortune – I myself am good-fortune;Strong and content, I travel the open road.”And“Now I re-examine philosophies and religions,They may prove well in lecture-rooms, yet not prove at all under the spaciousclouds, and along the landscape and flowing currents.”And“Mon enfant! I give you my hand!I give you my love, more precious than money,I give you myself, before preaching or law;Will you give me yourself? will you come travel with me?Shall we stick by each other as long as we live?”On President Lincoln’s Assassination – one of his most moving pieces:"O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won;The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring:But O heart! heart! heart! O the bleeding drops of red, Where on the deck my Captain lies, Fallen cold and dead.O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;Rise up--for you the flag is flung--for you the bugle trills; 10For you bouquets and ribbon'd wreaths--for you the shores a-crowding;For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;Here Captain! dear father! This arm beneath your head; It is some dream that on the deck, You've fallen cold and dead.My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;The ship is anchor'd safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won; 20Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells! But I, with mournful tread, Walk the deck my Captain lies, Fallen cold and dead."On Whitman’s Acceptance of Death:“I bequeath myself to the dirt to grow from the grass I love,If you want me again look for me under your boot soles.You will hardly know who I am or what I am,But I shall be good health to you nevertheless,And filter and fibre your blood.Failing to fetch me at first keep encouraged,Missing me one place search another,I stop somewhere waiting for you.”more
A lot of the poems didn't speak to me. Particularly the war and patriotism ones. But in amongst those are some absolute gems on the topic of love and looks, work and life. And compost! How can I not approve of a man who writes a poem about compost?more
Read this book as a requirement for an Major American Writers class and found it to incredible. I rarely like the books that are assigned in class, but this one is one of the few exceptions.more
Song of Myself

1
I celebrate myself, and sing myself,
And what I assume you shall assume,
For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.
I loafe and invite my soul,
I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass.
My tongue, every atom of my blood, form'd from this soil, this air,
Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same,
I, now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin,
Hoping to cease not till death.
Creeds and schools in abeyance,
Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,
I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,
Nature without check with original energy.

more
It is easy, and periodically fashionable to take Whitman for granted. Yes he is shamelessly self-involved and often goofy. He is also -- and here's the point, brothers and sisters -- continually amazing, and very good company. As with Bruckner Symphonies and the poems of Homer, there will always be the vexing question of which text is best. This particular edition is that, but its occasional inadequacies are more than covered by the wonderful illustrations by Lewis C. Daniel, an artist who dserved better than the obscurity into whic he has fallen.more
While I appreciate the beautiful language used by Walt Whitman and free verse poetry in general, I am not really a fan. I much prefer the rhyming verse of Tennyson, Longfellow, Browning, etc. In fact, the one poem by Whitman that I really enjoy is O Captain! My Captain!, with conventional meter and rhyme. I am glad that I read this book and familiarized myself with Whitman's style, but it's not really for me.more
Honestly my favorite collection of poems. The open road is my favorite. Walt Whitman discusses the connectedness of nature, democracy, and subtler, prettier things.more
Walt Whitman is a genius of a poet. He takes what seems like existential ramblings, and turns them into beautiful and self-reflective pieces of art. This is not just poetry, it’s literally a thesis on life, a philosophical treasure, a song that celebrates being alive, a picture depicting the cycles of life, an ode to the SOUL – simple thoughts, taken to extraordinary levels by an extraordinary man.Although to some, the poems may be too open-ended, long, tedious or verbose to appear enjoyable - but, when you lay bare the meaning behind Whitman's words, you cannot help but feel empowered, aware, introspective, a believer in life, the lover of a human body, and a worshiper of the human soul. What more can you ask from a poet, and his poetry? Read it, live it, and love it!more
The book that started it all. I would never have gone back to college if I hadn't read this--carried it with me everywhere for months! Walt Whitman is my "great uncle."more
If there was a single book I could have on a deserted island it would be "Leaves of Grass". It is beautiful, inspired writing. It's been analyzed by many so I'll spare you any grand statements or a lot of detail, but for a taste of the themes Whitman puts across:- All men are brothers. The book celebrates the common man, and embraces the man that society has cast out or looked down upon.- Delight and oneness with nature. Delight in the small things in nature.- Spirituality achieved not by subjugating the senses or pleasures but by embracing them, and living life to the fullest.- The belief in the innate power, spirituality, and goodness of man. All of this is done in a very natural, unpretentious way ... I believe Whitman was truly inspired when he initially wrote this book, and was not regurgitating someone else's philosophy or metaphysics. There are so many wonderful passages and quotes, maybe someday I'll include some here but for now I'll just say I highly, highly recommend this book. Read it outside, under a tree.more
My favorite Whitman piece is "To You, Whoever You Are". This poem is not included in the 1855 edition of Leaves Of Grass. This is the only reason I am not giving it 5 stars. And it's no fault of Walt's. Not even my own, I just felt I needed to own this edition. Surely I will procure the deathbed edition in due time and while some more hours away in the sunshine reading his genius.I love Walt Whitman, period.more
a literary find. read with different understanding each decade of my life so far. still have my original copy - a gift at age 16 of a 1921 edition... can't even see the title on the cover anymore. all my reading has been measured against this volume. everyone should read it - at least once.more
For some reason, Walt Whitman and Brahms are tied up in my mind as the same person...kinda like God and Santa Claus were when I was a kid. Regardless, Whitman (like Brahms) is obviously a genius!more
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